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Thread: and give us our daily bread, part 3

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    and give us our daily bread, part 3

    A few recipes:

    It is called Lavash in the Caucasus, Nan in Aserbeidjan, Brot in Germany, bread in English speaking countries. The Italians call it pane, the Indians Chapatties.In Turkey it is Pita and in Russia, the name is Khleb.
    One thing can be for sure. Whatever the shape or size, bread is one of the finest foods. In fact, it would not be an exaggeration to say that we can not do without it. How much do we eat in a year? Together with meat, potatoes and vegetables, we consume more than 100 kgr of bread a year on average.

    Russian Black Bread:

    Bread flour 2 1/2 cups 12 oz 360 gr
    Rye flour 1 cup 4 3/4 oz 145 gr
    Water or buttermilk 1 1/2 cup 375 ml
    Salt 1 ts 7 gr
    Margarine 2 Ts 55 gr
    Cornsyrup or Molasses 2 Ts 60 gr
    Brown sugar 1 Ts 15 gr
    Caraway seeds 1 Ts 10 gr
    Fennel seeds 1/4 ts 3 gr
    Dry yeast 2 ts 10 gr

    Place all the ingredients in the mixer and with the dough hook make the dough according to the instructions on your machine.
    Cover dough and let rise for about 1 hour or until double in size.
    Punch dough down again, make loaf form and let rise again.
    Put dough in a prepared bread-/caketin and bake at 240°C (475°F) for 10 minutes. Than turn back the heat to about 180 °C (350°F) and bake for 40-50 minutes.
    Make a test with a wooden Shashlik stick. If inserted and it comes back out clean, the bread is done. Turn off the heat and let the bread cool in the tin.
    Variations:
    For a slightly different taste, add 3 Ts coffee or cocoa powder. The exact amount varies with the brand and darkness of the product used.
    For a more tart taste, add 1Ts of cider vinegar.
    If you have a bread-making machine, work according to the manufacturer's instructions. Use whole-wheat, regular crust sett-
    ing.

    Australian Bush Bread (Damper):

    Self-rising flour 4 cups 550 gr
    Salt 1 Ts 20 gr
    Butter 1 oz 30 gr
    Milk 1 cup 250 ml
    Water 1/2 cup 125 ml

    Sift flour and salt into large mixing bowl.
    Place butter in the bowl. Rub in with your hands. (Wash them first!).
    Make a well in flour and pour in milk and water.
    Mix with a knife until the dough leaves the sides of the bowl.
    Place on a greased scone tray and pat out to about 20 cm in diameter.
    Cut a cross on top and place in hot oven, 200°C (400°F).
    Bake for 20 minutes, then lower heat to moderate180°C (360°F).
    Bake for a further 10-15 minutes or until the damper sounds hollow when rapped with your knuckles.

    Injera-Ethiopian Pancake bread:

    Injera, the traditional bread of Ethiopia, is a sourdough 'pancake' made with tef. (A native grain unique to Ethiopia). You can get approximately the same thing using wheat flour and baking powder.
    Whole wheat flour 1/2 cup 65 gr
    White flour 1/3 cup 45 gr
    Brown sugar 1 Ts 15 gr
    Salt 1/2 ts 5 gr
    Baking powder 1/2 ts 2 1/2 gr
    Egg, beaten 2 pcs
    Buttermilk 2 cups 250 ml
    Oil 1 Ts 15 ml

    Sift together the flours, sugar, salt, and baking powder.
    Combine eggs, buttermilk and oil. Add this mixture all at once to flour mixture. Stir until smooth.
    Pour 2 tablespoons of batter into a hot, non-stick frying pan so that the batter covers the bottom. Lift and quickly rotate the
    pan to even out the batter. Return skillet to medium heat. Cook about one minute or until lightly browned on the bottom. Invert bread onto paper towels. Serve warm. Make approximately 16 to 20 patties.

    A second, even quicker recipe:

    Self-rising flour 4 cups 550gr
    Whole wheat flour 1 cup 130 gr
    Baking powder 1 ts 2 1/2 gr
    Soda water 2 cups 500 ml

    Combine flours and baking powder in a bowl. Add club soda plus about 4 cups water. Mix into a smooth, fairly thin batter. Heat a large, non-stick skillet. When a drop of water bounces on the pan's surface, dip enough batter from the bowl to cover the bottom of the skillet, and pour it in quickly, all at once. Turn the pan so that the entire bottom is evenly coated, then put it back on the heat. When the moisture has evaporated and small holes appear on the surface, remove the Injera. It should be cooked only on one side, and not too browned. If your first one is a little pasty and undercooked, you may need to cook a little longer or to make the next one thinner.
    Stack the Injera one on top of the other as you cook, covering with a clean cloth to prevent their drying out.

    Roggenbrot (Rye Bread)

    Yeast, active dry 2 pkt 14 gr
    Milk, lukewarm 1 1/2 cups 375 ml
    Salt 1 t s 5 gr
    Butter 2 Ts 30 gr
    Bread flour, unsifted 2 1/2 cups 350 gr
    Rye flour, unsifted 3 1/4 cups 450 gr
    Warm water 1/2 cup 125 ml
    Sugar 2 T s 30 gr
    Molasses 1/2 cup 115 gr
    Caraway seeds 1 Ts 10gr

    Dissolve yeast in warm water. In a large bowl combine milk, sugar, and salt.
    Use a mixer to beat in molasses, butter, yeast mixture and1 cup of rye flour. Use a wooden spoon to mix in the remaining rye flour. Add white flour by stirring until the dough is stiff enough to knead.
    Knead 5 to 10 minutes, adding flour as needed. If the dough sticks to your hands or the board add more flour.
    Cover dough and let rise 1 -1 1/2 hours or until double. Punch down dough and divide to form 2 round or oval loaves.
    Let loaves rise on a greased baking sheet until double, about 1 1/2 hours.
    Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Bake for 30 to 35 minutes.

    How to make real bread?

    While it is a lot of effort and it takes quite some time to make the sour dough starter, after you have tasted this bread, you never will want to have any other, believe me! You can keep the bread for up to a week in a breadbox, it will never get moldy or dry out.
    This is actually still a recipe from the village in Austria were I grew up as a boy. As with many traditional recipes, nothing was measured, feeling did it. The weather was bad, add a little bit more sourdough starter. The flour was not so dry (in fall) use less water. Unfortunately for a recipe, one can not write 'a glass full of this' and a 'handful of that'.
    I had to try this recipe several times, with the help of an Austrian master baker who still remembered how it was done in HIS younger days!

    Sour dough Starter:

    1st step, 00h: want to add seeds:
    350 gr hot water
    Rye flour 50 gr 350 gr seeds
    Water 50 ml let soak in nearly boiling
    Mix ingredients, cover water over night
    with a clean cloth and let
    stand on a warm place for 4 hours.

    2nd step:

    Rye flour 280 gr
    Water 280 ml
    Add mix from 'first step' cover
    again with a cloth and let stand
    for two hours.

    3rd step:

    Rye flour 1400 gr
    Water 1200ml
    Add mix from 'second step,
    Before adding to step four keep10% for next day (if you plan to make bread again) at a later stage, you also can freeze this sour dough.)
    Let stand again for 10 hours.

    4th step:

    Starter dough ('sour dough') 3000 gr 6.6 lb.
    Rye flour 1000 gr 2.2 lb.
    Dark wheat flour 1000 gr 2.2 lb.
    Flour, all purpose 800 gr 5 3/4 cups
    Water or buttermilk 1600 ml 6 1/2 cups
    Salt 80 gr 4 Ts
    Yeast fresh or 100 gr
    Yeast, dry, granulated 28 gr/4 pkt

    Make dough with all ingredients, proofing not needed anymore as such. Just let rise for a few minutes to give your loaves a nice shape.
    Bake at start hot 240 °C for about 10 minutes, turn back heat, to about 50-60 min baking time
    This recipe will yield approximately 8 kgr bread.
    Since it is rather time consuming to make the sour dough starter it is recommended that you bake more bread at once and freeze what you can not use up in a week.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Benedikt For This Useful Post:

    TheInterocitor (21-10-2021)

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    Complete cut and paste fail.

    Lavash and khleb are nothing alike.

    Couldnt read the rest of this trash.

    You would think a supposed chef would know better.

    I guess a chef isnt a baker tho.... So maybe thats it...

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by americaninmoscow View Post
    Lavash and khleb are nothing alike.
    True, but they both can be classified as "bread."
    "Defund the Social Sciences." - Fantastika, 2020

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to TheInterocitor For This Useful Post:

    Benedikt (21-10-2021)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    One thing can be for sure. Whatever the shape or size, bread is one of the finest foods.
    The mile-long list of additives and artificial ingredients on the typical American loaf of bread makes it into a toxic stew. Ingredients to make it look nice and white, ingredients to make it smell nice. ingredients to prevent it from growing mold, additives to make to taste nice, the texture nice, make it soft, etc.

    What does your body do with all this toxic crap? It can't be digested, so it is stored in the fatty tissues. ONe more reason why Americans can not reason very well and are becoming increasingly obese.

    I usually got Russian bread when I was in Russia, but once I found some American loaves. Very sweet and tasty, and later I had a headache.
    "Defund the Social Sciences." - Fantastika, 2020

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to TheInterocitor For This Useful Post:

    Benedikt (21-10-2021)

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    Quote Originally Posted by americaninmoscow View Post
    Complete cut and paste fail.

    Lavash and khleb are nothing alike.

    Couldnt read the rest of this trash.

    You would think a supposed chef would know better.

    I guess a chef isnt a baker tho.... So maybe thats it...
    just because YOU cant read does not mean it is trash, maybe it is your computer which is trash? i work with a mac and open office. maybe your trash Windows cant read it? and while i am a Chef indeed, but also have learned, from a master baker, how to bake, and from a Pastry chef how to make cakes and the likes. And, from an old master butcher, i also have leaned how to make REAL sausages and -Leberkäse-.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    just because YOU cant read does not mean it is trash, maybe it is your computer which is trash? i work with a mac and open office. maybe your trash Windows cant read it? and while i am a Chef indeed, but also have learned, from a master baker, how to bake, and from a Pastry chef how to make cakes and the likes. And, from an old master butcher, i also have leaned how to make REAL sausages and -Leberkäse-.
    Blah blah blah.

    Lavash and khleb are not the same.

    Full stop.

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheInterocitor View Post
    True, but they both can be classified as "bread."
    Wonderbread is classified as bread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by americaninmoscow View Post
    Lavash and khleb are not the same.
    This is a true statement, but Bennie is not "wrong."

    Just go the dictionary definitions:

    Bread: Food made of flour, water, and yeast or another leavening agent, mixed together and baked.

    La·vash /ləˈväSH/ noun
    a crisp Middle Eastern flatbread.

    Лава́ш (азерб. lavaş, арм. լավաշ, груз. ლავაში, перс. لواش‎ — lavâš, тат. lәvәş, тур. lavaş) — пресный белый хлеб в виде тонкой лепёшки из пшеничной муки, распространённый преимущественно у народов Кавказа, в Иране, Афганистане[2] и в других регионах Передней Азии.

    Lavash {n} [dünnes ungesäuertes Fladenbrot]

    All types of Lavash are Bread, but not all types of Bread are Lavash. For example, "Wonder Bread" (which we used to wad up into spitballs to throw at classmates during lunch hour), is not Lavash.

    A: Set of all types of Bread
    B: Set of all types of Lavash

    If every member of set A is also a member of set B, then A is a subset of B, we write A ⊆ B. We can say A is contained in B.

    We can also say A ⊇ B, A is a superset of B, A includes B, or A contains B.
    If B is not a subset of A, we write B ⊈ A.
    If B is a subset of A (B ⊆ A), but B is not equal to A, then we say B is a proper subset of A, written as B ⊂ A or B ⊊ A.

    Image26.jpg
    "Defund the Social Sciences." - Fantastika, 2020

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheInterocitor View Post
    This is a true statement, but Bennie is not "wrong."

    Just go the dictionary definitions:

    Bread: Food made of flour, water, and yeast or another leavening agent, mixed together and baked.

    La·vash /ləˈväSH/ noun
    a crisp Middle Eastern flatbread.

    Лава́ш (азерб. lavaş, арм. լավաշ, груз. ლავაში, перс. لواش‎ — lavâš, тат. lәvәş, тур. lavaş) — пресный белый хлеб в виде тонкой лепёшки из пшеничной муки, распространённый преимущественно у народов Кавказа, в Иране, Афганистане[2] и в других регионах Передней Азии.

    Lavash {n} [dünnes ungesäuertes Fladenbrot]

    All types of Lavash are Bread, but not all types of Bread are Lavash. For example, "Wonder Bread" (which we used to wad up into spitballs to throw at classmates during lunch hour), is not Lavash.

    A: Set of all types of Bread
    B: Set of all types of Lavash

    If every member of set A is also a member of set B, then A is a subset of B, we write A ⊆ B. We can say A is contained in B.

    We can also say A ⊇ B, A is a superset of B, A includes B, or A contains B.
    If B is not a subset of A, we write B ⊈ A.
    If B is a subset of A (B ⊆ A), but B is not equal to A, then we say B is a proper subset of A, written as B ⊂ A or B ⊊ A.

    Image26.jpg
    Sorry mate.

    Lavash and bread are similar but not the same.

    One is leaven and the other not.

    If u dont believe, try to serve lavash with soup and watch heads explode.

    I mean, its like saying a flour tortilla is bread.

    Yes, they play the same role, but you cant eat bread tacos.

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    Quote Originally Posted by americaninmoscow View Post
    Sorry mate.

    Lavash and bread are similar but not the same.

    One is leaven and the other not.

    If u dont believe, try to serve lavash with soup and watch heads explode.

    I mean, its like saying a flour tortilla is bread.

    Yes, they play the same role, but you cant eat bread tacos.
    Furthermore,

    The exact same leftover dough can be rolled thin and baked.

    We call these crackers.

    No one would confuse crackers for bread, although they are similar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by americaninmoscow View Post
    Furthermore,

    The exact same leftover dough can be rolled thin and baked.

    We call these crackers.

    No one would confuse crackers for bread, although they are similar.
    crackers are made with - soda -. bread, and that includes also lavash, are made with yeast. go home and learn first.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    crackers are made with - soda -. bread, and that includes also lavash, are made with yeast. go home and learn first.
    Crackers can be made from leftover bread dough. You roll the dough thin and then apply whatever seasonings/flavourings you want. If you just learned this on expat. Ru, then congratulations on your victory.

    And please continue to post more insightful cut and paste articles written by american hipsters trying to use exotic foreign words in an attempt to sound wordly while developing a portfolio so they can one day be hired by buzzfeed

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    Quote Originally Posted by americaninmoscow View Post
    Crackers can be made from leftover bread dough. You roll the dough thin and then apply whatever seasonings/flavourings you want. If you just learned this on expat. Ru, then congratulations on your victory.

    And please continue to post more insightful cut and paste articles written by american hipsters trying to use exotic foreign words in an attempt to sound wordly while developing a portfolio so they can one day be hired by buzzfeed
    i have written these articles more than 20 years ago. when i was writing for Chefs Newspapers and magazines.when the word -hipster - was not even invented.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

  17. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    i have written these articles more than 20 years ago. when i was writing for Chefs Newspapers and magazines.when the word -hipster - was not even invented.
    Hipster was a thing in the early- mid 90s.

    Thats more than 20 years ago.

    https://seinfeld.fandom.com/wiki/The_Glasses

    I guess a chef isnt a historian, either.

    Here is the scene where elaine accuses kramer of being a hipster doofus.

    https://youtu.be/tOp_77i58Ks

    And here is the wiki-

    The term hipster in its present usage first appeared in the 1990s and became particularly prominent in the late 2000s and early 2010s,[

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    Lavash IS Bread https://www.armgeo.am/en/armenian-lavash/
    just because other countries have different forms, sizes or shapes, we think only out western style bread can be called bread. what contains water flour, salt and yeast, or any other - leavening product, i make bread also with Kefir, sour cream,soda, it is all called bread. one can make even bread with Pizza dough. even that the ORIGINAL ( thin crust) Pizza dough contains no yeast.https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...recipe-1921714
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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