by the way the REAL story about that Austrian favorite, the Vienna Schnitzel, a most amazing thing, still to come..
Did you know?
Doughnuts, or 'Faschingskrapfen, as the fried dough product is called in Germany supposedly were invented around 1615.
They were originally eaten only during 'Fasching', the period from the 6th of January until Shrove Tuesday.

Did you know?
Fat differs from oil in that at room temperature fat should be solid, while oils are usually liquid

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Fruit Mice Tarts were originally made in the shape of a cradle symbolising the birth of Christ. The top of the tart was slit and an effigy of the baby Christ was inserted into the tarts.

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Ginger is thought to have originated many thousand years ago in Asia.Although it grows best in tropical climates, traders and merchants have spread it around the globe. Ginger has been used in medicine since at least 5000 years. It is also used widely in pastries, drinks, for fillings and puddings.

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As so many other pastries, the Crusaders who discovered the delicacy on their travels to the Holy Land brought Gingerbread to Europe.

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Glycerin, a clear, sweet, syrupy liquid is a byproduct of soap production. It is extracted from animal fats and oils.

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Grapes are the world's most widely grown fruits. They are also the oldest, fossils, dating back to the Bronze Age have been found. Moreover, as we all know grapes were certainly used in making wine from early biblical times.

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Grissini, these thin breadsticks were called 'petit batons de Turin', originated indeed from that Italian city. Traditionally they were made to the length of the baker's lower arm.

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Gum Arabic, used in confectionery as a glaze, is obtained from the sap of the acacia trees, which are found in Africa, India and Australia.It is water-soluble, requiring twice its own weight in warm water. On dissolving, it becomes a clear liquid, which is being used to glaze cookies, buns and sweets.

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Hazelnuts, the fruit of the hazel bush are also known as filberts or cobnuts.
The nuts, growing wild, were already enjoyed by the Chinese since at least 3000 BC before being cultivated. Traders and merchants brought the nuts on their travel to the Mediterranean and later to Europe.

Did you know?
The traveler Marco Polo brought the Vienna Schnitzel, the crumbed and deep-fried piece of veal or pork, popular all over the world, originally from China to Venice. From there it started to spread out further north...(Never tell this an Austrian Chef!)

Did you know?
Spaghetti, the essence of Italian cooking hails from far further away. It was the traveler Marco Polo who brought pasta in one form or the other, from China back to Venice. Of course, the Chef at your favorite Italian restaurant will nothing want to know about this.

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Honey, the original sweetener, has been in use since thousands of years. The Romans mixed it with snow and so the first sorbets were made. When the sorbets thawed and maybe accidentally started to ferment, the first alcoholic drink, mead was discovered.

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Hot cross buns have a cross made with a paste of flour and water, marked on top before being baked. Most explanations relate to the religious significance of the Easter period. The Anglo Saxons baked the sweet buns in honor of their spring goddess Eostre. Others believe it simply marks the four quarters of the moon.

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Hush Puppies, is a name given to American cornmeal cakes. It is said they were given this name because they were thrown to puppies after they begun to howl when smelling the cornmeal cakes being cooked.

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Marco Polo brought back from his travels to China a recipe for a snow based dessert made with goats milk, fruit, honey and ice. This was the first crude recipe for today's ice cream.

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When Catherine de Medici moved to France in 1533 to marry King Henry II, her court Chef took with him the recipe how to make ice cream. Bernardo Buonatalenti made this possible by the discovery in the early 1500s on the freezing effect of salt and ice. However, it still could be served only in winter, as there were no freezing facilities other than snow or ice.

Did you know?
'Kipferln', also known as Viennese horns are a tradition in Germany and are said to symbolise the goat's horn, long a symbol of fertility in German folklore. Actually, they were invented in Austria since as far back as the early 13th century.

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Lamington is a truly Australian pastry. Named in honor of Lord Lamington, Governor of Queensland from 1895-1901.The Lord's Chef dipped a square of butttercake into a chocolate icing glaze and rolled it in desiccated coconut.
Lamingtons are traditionally served for morning or afternoon teas, split in half and filled with jam or cream.

Did you know?
Lemon, a fruit of the citrus family is the second most popular fruit in cooking. The first is the orange. Lemons originated in India and Malaysia many centuries ago.
Besides its myriad's of other uses one is nearly forgotten now: Combined with a little salt, lemon cleans copper miraculously within seconds.

Did you know?
The lemon brought by traders first to the Middle East in the 14th Century from India and Malaysia reached the Mediterranean next. On its arrival in Greece, Alexander the Great 'suggested' that he had discovered the sour fruit...

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In his voyage across the Atlantic, Christopher Columbus took the lemons to Haiti, from there they spread out quickly into mainland America.
Most parts of the lemon can be used, with the exemption of the white pith under the skin. It becomes unpleasant bitter when cooked.

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For Leopard Skin Bread, no poor cat has her fur pulled over her ears. Before baking, the loaves are being brushed with a mixture of liquid yeast and rice flour. During baking the skin becomes crisp and blotchy and resembles the skin of a leopard.

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Lightning cake is an orange-flavoured butttercake with nuts. An American favorite, it got its name because it rises as quickly as lightning. This is due to the fairly big amount of baking powder used in the recipe.

Did you know?
Macadamia nuts, a native of Australia were also known as Queensland nut, after the state it was first discovered. Dr.John Macadam found them in the Queensland rainforests in 1875.

Did you know?
Maize, also known as corn, is one of the most versatile members of the cereal family.
Fernando Cortes, the Conquistador, who brought it with him from his travels to the Americas, first introduced it to Europe.

Did you know?
Maple Syrup is the sweet sap collected in spring from one of over 200 varieties of maple trees.
The story goes, while out hunting and Indian shot an arrow into a tree. When pulling it out he found that it was covered in rich syrup. Trees are being tapped only for 6 to 8 weeks during spring. The syrup is than boiled and reduced to give it the sweet flavour and aroma.