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Thread: Agafya Lykova moved into her new home. Thanks to a well known -sponsor-

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    Agafya Lykova moved into her new home. Thanks to a well known -sponsor-

    https://siberiantimes.com/other/othe...yan-mountains/

    nothing in the - main media -. suppose who cares about a lonely woman in the forests of Siberia? or the oligarch Oleg Deripaska who paid for all that. At least Agafaya will be able to live out her remaining days in some sort of comfort. let's just hope that none of the many people who worked there brought -the bug - with them.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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    Amazing woman.

    I see there's a wood stove in the cabin, for heat.

    Luba says she is not allowed to chop down small tree in forest for firewood for her cabin near Krasnofimsk, you are supposed to only gather the branches that have fallen off.
    "Defund the Social Sciences." - Fantastika, 2020

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheInterocitor View Post
    Amazing woman.

    I see there's a wood stove in the cabin, for heat.

    Luba says she is not allowed to chop down small tree in forest for firewood for her cabin near Krasnofimsk, you are supposed to only gather the branches that have fallen off.
    You can't burn fresh cut trees anyway, the wood must be dried for a few months.
    If you trust the government you obviously failed history class. " George Carlin"

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheInterocitor View Post
    Amazing woman.

    I see there's a wood stove in the cabin, for heat.

    Luba says she is not allowed to chop down small tree in forest for firewood for her cabin near Krasnofimsk, you are supposed to only gather the branches that have fallen off.
    i am sure, as the rangers are keeping contact with her, they will also always make sure that she has a good store of firewood. dried and cut into small pieces that will fit in her stove.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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    Those people in Texas wish they had wood stove, when the whole state froze. Happened to my sister in Arkansas, they live alone, way out in the country. The power failed, the snow was 1/2 a meter, so they could not go anywhere, the temperature was minus for a week. Now they have a wood stove, but have never used it! I had wood stove in basement of my old house, I stopped using it, I was afraid I would catch the house on fire.
    "Defund the Social Sciences." - Fantastika, 2020

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Wally View Post
    You can't burn fresh cut trees anyway, the wood must be dried for a few months.
    Not quite true - you can burn some types of wood when wet and freshly cut, but the heat / energy you will get from it will not be its maximum and the sap will burn fiercely.

    Ideally, firewood requires anywhere from 6 - 24 months to dry. It is best to cut, split and store wood in late winter and early spring for use during the following year.

    This is because it allows the wood to dry over the summer months, and season in time for when it is needed during the next period of colder weather.
    Если враг в пределах досягаемости, то и вы тоже!


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    Quote Originally Posted by TolkoRaz View Post
    Not quite true - you can burn some types of wood when wet and freshly cut, but the heat / energy you will get from it will not be its maximum and the sap will burn fiercely.

    Ideally, firewood requires anywhere from 6 - 24 months to dry. It is best to cut, split and store wood in late winter and early spring for use during the following year.

    This is because it allows the wood to dry over the summer months, and season in time for when it is needed during the next period of colder weather.
    Yes, pine can burn because of the sap, we used to just light the pine sap on fire on living trees to keep a flame alive.
    If you trust the government you obviously failed history class. " George Carlin"

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheInterocitor View Post
    Those people in Texas wish they had wood stove, when the whole state froze. Happened to my sister in Arkansas, they live alone, way out in the country. The power failed, the snow was 1/2 a meter, so they could not go anywhere, the temperature was minus for a week. Now they have a wood stove, but have never used it! I had wood stove in basement of my old house, I stopped using it, I was afraid I would catch the house on fire.
    wood burning stoves need in deed a correct setup and that will include the chimney. and that should be done under or with the supervision and help of a professional. if one has a house and a -furnace - in the cellar, most of them are these days - multi use -. one can heat with gas, oil, pellets, even carton and paper or wood. after such an experience and if one has the space or palce, definitely a worthwhile investment.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    wood burning stoves need in deed a correct setup and that will include the chimney. and that should be done under or with the supervision and help of a professional. if one has a house and a -furnace - in the cellar, most of them are these days - multi use -. one can heat with gas, oil, pellets, even carton and paper or wood. after such an experience and if one has the space or palce, definitely a worthwhile investment.
    Yes the chimney needs to be the correct height in relation to the roof of the house, if not you will fill your home with smoke.
    If you trust the government you obviously failed history class. " George Carlin"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Wally View Post
    Yes the chimney needs to be the correct height in relation to the roof of the house, if not you will fill your home with smoke.
    in our house in Austria, fair enough it is also cold there and every house had a wood burning stove in the kitchen, the chimney went right down to the basement. only bricks and mortar, no fanzy tubes or pipes. there was also a little - door - right at the bottom. when the chimney sweep came, 2x a year, he opened it and could clean out al lthat assorted gunk that might collect over 6 month.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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    I called the chimney sweep in Virginia, he cleaned out the chimney, but when I made a fire it seemed that sometimes a little knot of wood would "explode" out of stove and fall on the carpet. But the carpet would not burn, they started making them fireproof many years ago. But my problem was falling asleep with a cigarette in one hand. I would be smoking, drinking and reading a horror novel, then just suddenly fall asleep. The cigarette fall on the carpet and I woke up a couple hours later. The carpet did not burn but there was a big scorched hole in it and the house was full of noxious smoke. I coughed and coughed and coughed. I did not breathe properly for a couple of days. It happened before, twice, in Tampa, falling asleep after 9-10 beers with cigarette in hand, reading another horror novel. There was big hole in sofa, where the cigarette had seared it, but not caught fire. The house was full of the smoke from the melting chemicals in the sofa. So I covered the hole in the sofa with a board and blanket, then a couple of weeks later I fell asleep on the other side of the sofa, with similar ill after-effects. After the landlord discovered his sofa, he gave me 3 days to get out. I decided to always keep one hand on the book, and the other hand with the cigarette always over the ashtray when not puffing away or holding the beer bottle. The only good benefit out of all this idiocy was that because I read so many horror novels, I was easily able to write my own horror novel.

    I have to be careful of fire. An old girlfriend, who claimed she was a witch, put a curse of fire of me when we broke up. Later, my roommate decided to bring his motorcycle inside, near the back door, to work on it. He turned it upside down and did not notice the gasoline leaking out of the gas tank, and lit a cigarette. You know the rest... Then when I moved back to my home town, the house next door caught fire. Couple years later, we lived in a duplex and the black guy on the other side was having his regular Saturday night cocaine and marihoona party and they started cooking up some food on the stove, which was next to the wall separating the halves of the duplex. That grease fire went the wall fast. We were walking home from the bar and my roommate and I saw the fire trucks clanging by, wondering where the firs was, OH it's our house. Do firemen get their jollies by breaking things and smashing windows (every single window)? Then I had a house in Virginia burn down when the tenant's kid put a t-shirt over the space heater. Then I had a house in Springfield, Missouri, three stories, the top floor caught fire. It was struck by lightning, the fire department told me. Not sure if I believe them, Springfield is a corrupt city, and the kid renting the top floor was a pothead.

    A lot of times, I tried to make French fries, with a pot of peanut oil (f-ing вкусно!) or corn oil, and forget to turn the stove off after the fries were done. The stove with the pot of hot oil simmering on it...you know what happens, Whoosh! there's suddenly a column of flame shooting up to the ceiling. Put a lid on it, throwing water on it will just spread it. Later, the landlord is wondering why the ceiling is scorched. Living by myself, 3-4 times I forget to turn off the stove, and the pot top pops off, and there's a ring of fire around the pot. Now I always check the stove burner is off, 3-4 times I check. But I usually just get the fries at a restaurant, never make my own anymore.

    Now I keep a fire extinguisher next to my stove. And another one in the hallway. And a six-shooter in the bedroom. My own mini- Fire and Police Department.

    I took the fire extinguisher to the fire department, they said it's okay. You're supposed to re-charge them every couple of years.
    "Defund the Social Sciences." - Fantastika, 2020

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    a fire extinguisher NEXT to the stove is wrong. when a fire starts there you are to come already WITH an extinguisher in your hands and try to do something...
    AND IT IS INDEED, I NA HOUSE FIRE, OR EVEN IN AN AIRPLANE, PEOPLE DIE MORE FROM THE TOXIC FUMES, MIGHT THAT BE A CARPET, THE TONS OF PLASTIC WE ARE USING AROUND OUR HOUSE, THEN FROM A REAL FIRE ITSELF.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    in our house in Austria, fair enough it is also cold there and every house had a wood burning stove in the kitchen, the chimney went right down to the basement. only bricks and mortar, no fanzy tubes or pipes. there was also a little - door - right at the bottom. when the chimney sweep came, 2x a year, he opened it and could clean out al lthat assorted gunk that might collect over 6 month.
    I used to build fire places, we put a hard clay tube in the chimney not a metal pipe and then brick around that.
    If you trust the government you obviously failed history class. " George Carlin"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Wally View Post
    I used to build fire places, we put a hard clay tube in the chimney not a metal pipe and then brick around that.
    even clay tubes, i assume at that time he did mean the tubes that were used for -water-? were not allowed back than. the chimney sweep and also the firelaw said, clay can become -brittle over time, pieces can break out,fall down and clog the chimney. there were special bricks, chamotte(?),no idea what the name was that time,. when you build a chimney the chimney was -square on the outside. but round on the inside. bad thought of course now, maybe that is the reason, when a house burns down, the chimney is still standing?
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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