littleangels        English Nanny
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Residence Options in Russia - The Ultimate Guide

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 1

    Residence Options in Russia - The Ultimate Guide

    There is a lot of information out there, but most of it is not very accurate regarding residency options in Russia. I spent 5 years in Russia, studied Russian law, and navigated many of the options available myself personally. In an effort to make things more transparent, I have started a site Expatriant.com.

    You can find detailed information on living and working in Russia on the site. Recently, we put together a guide on residence options in Russia. I tried to outline all of the legal options for staying in Russia long-term. Of course there are options that are not 100% legal that we do not mention in the article. Additionally, there is extensive information about how to find a job in Russia. You can check out our Russia country guide.

    As the project is new, I would definitely appreciate any comments on the site or information. If you notice we are missing something, or there is information you would like to see, please let us know.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    here,since many years
    Posts
    20,454
    Thanked: 4504
    I am not speaking English as well as HRM.

    But i know this is a typo (?) or not correct. ++++++++ If you speak English as well her Majesty the Queen +++++++ and there are quite a few +++ punctuation mistakes +++ as well.

    Not once have I seen any link to any download for any document.Or for instance how to get out to Sacharovo. It is fair enough to assume that you want to make money and your site is aimed at totally - newcomers - who do not even know that Moscow has a Metro? Or what are the procedures or what to do AFTER you have received the TRP or PRP... Which is very important. Fines CAN be heavy. Or if the Inspector at the local OBM has a bad day, he can refuse the most important stamp and you can go back how where you come from. Good luck though with your site.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Benedikt For This Useful Post:

    FatAndy (03-01-2020), rusmeister (03-01-2020)

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Moscow
    Posts
    248
    Thanked: 92
    Information you posted isn’t up to date, you need to recheck the laws.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DiscoverLearn For This Useful Post:

    Benedikt (04-01-2020), FatAndy (03-01-2020)

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    7
    Thanked: 1
    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoverLearn View Post
    Information you posted isn’t up to date, you need to recheck the laws.
    Could you please be more specific about which parts are out of date?

    I posted here with the hope that I could get constructive criticism.

    Thanks!

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Moscow
    Posts
    375
    Thanked: 184
    Quote Originally Posted by matthewshannon9 View Post
    Could you please be more specific about which parts are out of date?

    I posted here with the hope that I could get constructive criticism.

    Thanks!
    1. A foreigner can RECEIVE a permanent residence permit after 1 year in Russia on a temporary residence permit. But you can APPLY for it sooner. It used to be after having a TRP for 6 months. I think that has been changed to 8 months, now that PRPs are processed faster.

    2. You list the following as a benefit of having a PRP: Right to own residential real estate and register there. But in fact you can own residential real estate AND register there even if you are in Russia on any kind of visa, including a tourist visa. Neither a TRP nor PRP is required.

  8. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to xp@ For This Useful Post:

    Benedikt (04-01-2020), BigBear (05-01-2020), FatAndy (03-01-2020), Hans.KK (04-01-2020)

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    644
    Thanked: 479
    In your section about applying for a temporary residence permit you say the applicant's passport needs to be shown. Further down the page you say "*All documents which are not in Russian, must be translated to Russian and apostilled." When I submitted my US passport to apply for the temporary residence permit, my US passport was not apostilled. It was translated into Russian and notarized. You need to check on this point. Otherwise, someone might apostille their passport unnecessarily.

    Your website claims to be detailed. However, the requirements of the Russian migration officials can vary from individual to individual. Some inspectors wanted each and every page of my passport translated and notarized when I applied for the TRP. Others wanted only the page with my picture and passport data (date of birth, etc) when I applied for the TRP. I ended up doing both versions.

    So...good luck in all this. But be cautious and show that whenever someone applies, to check the latest regulations and be aware of the way the inspectors work in this regard.

    I only checked the TRP page, nothing else. I would suggest you review the residency info very, very carefully.

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to xt-tsi For This Useful Post:

    Benedikt (05-01-2020), FatAndy (05-01-2020)

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    here,since many years
    Posts
    20,454
    Thanked: 4504
    [QUOTE=xt-tsi;1490576]In your section about applying for a temporary residence permit you say the applicant's passport needs to be shown. Further down the page you say "*All documents which are not in Russian, must be translated to Russian and apostilled." When I submitted my US passport to apply for the temporary residence permit, my US passport was not apostilled. It was translated into Russian and notarized. You need to check on this point. Otherwise, someone might apostille their passport unnecessarily.


    while the law says - one thing for all and everything-, reality is indeed different. when i did the translation of my ( Austrian) passport the NOTARY asked for the apostille. I had done it already, on advise of my consulate in Austria. the apostille will show that the passport was a real one and not a -fake -.says one. when i did my reregistration at the local OBM, the -old - inspector wanted to see a copy of ALL pages, including the empty ones, of my passport. When I came back a year alter to do the same procedure again, they had a NEW anketta-, he wanted only the passport copy where wording or stamps were on it, no empty pages.
    ( and maybe not related to here, the TAX people where not happy with my new passport, since it had -nothing - in yet. So i had to make a copy of my old, expired, passport. with all the visa, and stamps. And most important, the boarding cards and entry form that one gets at the airport from the immigration control. that little white paper that shows when you came in last... in the old passport i had some RED stamps, very bad to read on a cheap copier. the taxman refused 2x the copies,- can not read the stamps - until i did them myself. first the scan, then a copy on my MAC...)
    as you say indeed, the law is one thing, the individual - inspectors- another. and if one thinks it is only like that in Russia,forget it. the bean counters and stamp-pad protectors are the same all over the world)
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

  12. #8
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Dinskaya, Krasnodarskiy Kray, Russia
    Posts
    114
    Thanked: 77
    Quote Originally Posted by xp@ View Post
    1. A foreigner can RECEIVE a permanent residence permit after 1 year in Russia on a temporary residence permit. But you can APPLY for it sooner. It used to be after having a TRP for 6 months. I think that has been changed to 8 months, now that PRPs are processed faster.

    2. You list the following as a benefit of having a PRP: Right to own residential real estate and register there. But in fact you can own residential real estate AND register there even if you are in Russia on any kind of visa, including a tourist visa. Neither a TRP nor PRP is required.
    1. I confirm that you can apply for a PRP early. My application was made last year and accepted after 6 months on my TRP.
    2. You do not even have to live in Russia to own real estate. I purchased our house a couple of years before arriving, while I was still resident in Belgium. The fact that you own the property does not, however, grant you any benefit (as far as I can tell) when it comes to applying for either TRP or PRP. It does make it easier, of course, to register yourself once you do receive the residency permit.

  13. #9
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Dinskaya, Krasnodarskiy Kray, Russia
    Posts
    114
    Thanked: 77
    The points raised by xt-tsi an Benedikt about having the passport translation apostilled are interesting and highlight the sometimes arbitrary nature of officialdom here. As far as I know, a passport is one of the few documents that does not require an apostille to prove its genuine nature. However, I think that if the translation is made outside of Russia (for example, in your home country) then the translation (and its various stamps, etc.) has to be apostilled.

    In other words, it is usually better to have all translations made by a translator here in Russia and then notarized by a Russian notary.

  14. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to BigBear For This Useful Post:

    Benedikt (05-01-2020), FatAndy (05-01-2020), Hans.KK (05-01-2020)

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    644
    Thanked: 479
    Bigbear, your point is correct. As a result, a "definitive" articles and guidelines about obtaining residency in Russia are by definition partially incorrect. This is the risk of being definitive. Instead, it has to be a guideline and the author needs to add statements that amount to "trust but verify".

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to xt-tsi For This Useful Post:

    FatAndy (05-01-2020), Hans.KK (05-01-2020)

  17. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    here,since many years
    Posts
    20,454
    Thanked: 4504
    [QUOTE=BigBear;1490579]The points raised by xt-tsi an Benedikt about having the passport translation apostilled are interesting and highlight the sometimes arbitrary nature of officialdom here. As far as I know, a passport is one of the few documents that does not require an apostille to prove its genuine nature. However, I think that if the translation is made outside of Russia (for example, in your home country) then the translation (and its various stamps, etc.) has to be apostilled.

    Austrian Passports are not printed at the Consulate in Moscow anymore. They are being printed in Austria. Not by the Ministry of the Interior, but the - State of Austria Printer - ( Österreichische Staatsdruckerei) therefore the -Notarius- looked at the Apostille, so HE was assured the passport was real, before he put his name and stamp to the translation here in Moscow.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •