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Thread: ( house) roof. how many kgr, snow for instance, it should hold per sqm?

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    ( house) roof. how many kgr, snow for instance, it should hold per sqm?

    who has experience with building? or knows the russian building code. on a private house what are the norms for a roof? how many kgr of snow it should be able to hold. over a period of time? 200, 300 or 400 kgr per sqm?
    are there any norms where rainwater must go? can it go into the cities canalisation?
    does one need permission to put up a (big) - container to collect rainwater to water the garden in -dry- times?
    building is own(ed), not rented or the likes
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    who has experience with building? or knows the russian building code. on a private house what are the norms for a roof? how many kgr of snow it should be able to hold. over a period of time? 200, 300 or 400 kgr per sqm?
    are there any norms where rainwater must go? can it go into the cities canalisation?
    does one need permission to put up a (big) - container to collect rainwater to water the garden in -dry- times?
    building is own(ed), not rented or the likes
    Is this a standalone house or apartment building? Is it considered near a river or creek or body of water of any kind?

    Is it in a city or what kind of locale?

    I know there are norms for snow, but don't know how strictly enforced. Water requirements depend on how close to bodies of water and the like.

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    I did see you wrote house and assume you mean standalone dwelling. Will see what I have for info.

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    Benedikt (08-10-2019)

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    https://vseokrovle.com/rsschjot/35-r...-nagruski.html

    In simple terms, for Moscow oblast, the calculated weight is to be 180 kg / sq m, which is roughly a meter deep of semi-wet snow (very wet snow would be 300 kg/sq m. This calculation is meant to be such that the roof will not have to physically have snow removed at all (for construction standards purposes, may be different rules requiring removal for safety if e.g. snow likely to fall on passersby)

    If the roof is steep (over 30 degrees), this is reduced by multiplying by 0.7 giving 126 kg / sq m.

    I don't know answer for your water question. I think from what I recall is that if it goes into the ground or a container, it's generally okay (subject to some limits likely for size of roof / amount released into ground), and some technical stuff about how likley water is to damage the foundation. When you say 'big' container for water, these would be pretty big barrels, like oil barrel size, but if you mean especially big, no idea. (Note - if plastic barrels for gardens available in most shops, I doubt these are subject to any regulation at all)

    In other words, the idea is to limit the amount of water going into sewer or septic system that would then go straight into nearby water sources (rivers and the like). There may be extra limits applicable to eg water into ground where water sources are very close or sensitive or the state of the soil or whatever.

    In big cities water from roof may be allowed into sewer system, don't know details, rules probably mostly for multi-family dwellings.

    But roughly: should be okay with water from roof going to ground or a container/rainbarrel for a standalone single family house. (I don't know status here - in many other countries they strongly encourage _any_ rainwater collection system to stop/slow rainwater going into sewer system, i.e. may give away rainbarrels and the like. I haven't heard of that here.)

    But this only FWIW, have to check with specialists. Municipalities may have more strict rules, or stricter application of rules - may be mostly ignored in lots of places for water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Armoured View Post
    Is this a standalone house or apartment building? Is it considered near a river or creek or body of water of any kind?

    Is it in a city or what kind of locale?

    I know there are norms for snow, but don't know how strictly enforced. Water requirements depend on how close to bodies of water and the like.
    it is an - alone - standing house. building fully with cellar. 4 rooms one with tiles and concrete floor. the place is dry. also no - flooding - during spring snow melt or long rain.that room has the heating unit (gas), hot water boiler and other technical utilities. other 3 rooms just hard natural soul, good for storing - pogrip-... there is no river or other flowing water nearby. it will be all municipal canalisation. ( all connected already, except the rainwater from the roof.)
    roof is fairly steeply sloped, covered mit metal - imitation tile- sheets.
    - water containers- for catching rainwater. https://wikidwelling.fandom.com/wiki...relPlastic.JPG something like this, big square tanks. seen in most building supply stores around here.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benedikt View Post
    it is an - alone - standing house. building fully with cellar. 4 rooms one with tiles and concrete floor. the place is dry. also no - flooding - during spring snow melt or long rain.that room has the heating unit (gas), hot water boiler and other technical utilities. other 3 rooms just hard natural soul, good for storing - pogrip-... there is no river or other flowing water nearby. it will be all municipal canalisation. ( all connected already, except the rainwater from the roof.)
    roof is fairly steeply sloped, covered mit metal - imitation tile- sheets.
    - water containers- for catching rainwater. https://wikidwelling.fandom.com/wiki...relPlastic.JPG something like this, big square tanks. seen in most building supply stores around here.
    Just out of interest, is that water container in the ground or above-ground? What happens to water when it's full?

    Note for below I don't exactly know the rules but overall think you should be good:
    -generally authorities do not want rainwater from roofs etc going directly into municipal sewer system - and where there is separate storm sewers (i.e. drains on roads) they also want it to be slowed down by eg going to groundwater (because if storm sewers get overloaded may wash into regular sewer system - depends on locality though). Rainbarrel in that sense is a good thing, absorbs at least some of the water to be let into ground when the ground isn't saturated and at a speed it can absorb).
    -Rainbarrels also good in that water drawn from rainbarrels used to water garden means water not drawn from water treatment system.
    -Only downside of going to ground is if it overloads drainage arrangements under/around the foundation and to keep cellar dry. Rainbarrel helps with this too, as do drainpipes from roof etc that go further out. (I often see places with drainpipes from roof that go to ground right by side of building; ideally they should go out, say, a meter or so, outside the line where foundation drainage was laid. Usually not critical but just a good idea).
    -You can ask to check/see the drainage plans around foundation, but not easy to check how it was done in reality.
    -Cellar: a few years of no flooding, or even many years, doesn't mean there won't be in future; at some point if area floods or water table rises super-high, you can still get water in cellar. Not that there is a whole lot you can do about that in advance, except recognise it's possible.

    Also depends how the soil is, whether it's a type that drains well/holds water. If there's a garden/yard, also helps if the soil isn't bare, i.e. mulch of leaves/woodchips/compost whatever, or plants growing thickly, absorbs and buffers some rainfall, keeps water from running out too fast. But that's general and not specific to this place.

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    Benedikt (09-10-2019)

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    I don't know if they do it here but we always put tar on the outside of the foundation that would be underground. For the inside you can find a water stop coating that you paint on the walls and floor.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Wally View Post
    I don't know if they do it here but we always put tar on the outside of the foundation that would be underground. For the inside you can find a water stop coating that you paint on the walls and floor.
    There are lots of ways, although a much bigger deal where basements/cellars are common and local conditions like high water tables occur (e.g. in spring melt). I seem to see french drains put down or similar around these types of foundations here, I think I've seen that it's in the building code, but not sure. I'd think treatment of the foundation walls also required but don't know. Where I'm from weeping tiles along foundation walls to a lower drain is the usual way.

    That said, don't have the background to comment on specifics of this place, and we don't know the details anyway. Suppose you could have a builder look at the plans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Armoured View Post
    There are lots of ways, although a much bigger deal where basements/cellars are common and local conditions like high water tables occur (e.g. in spring melt). I seem to see french drains put down or similar around these types of foundations here, I think I've seen that it's in the building code, but not sure. I'd think treatment of the foundation walls also required but don't know. Where I'm from weeping tiles along foundation walls to a lower drain is the usual way.

    That said, don't have the background to comment on specifics of this place, and we don't know the details anyway. Suppose you could have a builder look at the plans.
    before any decision will be made, a -builder that we trust - , an electrician and some other people will have a look at the building and surroundings. and we will then act on their advice...
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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