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Thread: choosing to build a house on plot of land, Ruza, west of Moscow.

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Moscow Oblast Gorki-10
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    The hover-beast cutting height is adjustable by inserting one or more special disc spacers above the rotary cutter. Surprisingly easy. Yes, I definitely recommend a high cut to begin with and probably as the last cut for winter.

    There is a sister company, Husqvarna, owned by electrolux, same as Flymo. They have a twin battery mower. Some critics say that is not even enough, and one complained he bought two additional charger and a charger, setting him back an extra $600. Their mowers are expensive, yet some of them are exactly the same as the flymo wheeled range using same honda engine where they would be much cheaper in UK.

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Moscow Oblast Gorki-10
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    Fencing posts? are they erected in Russia using concrete? My wife says that's not the Russian way due to climate, they use brick, stones etc compact in the ground. Saw videos using sigafencing post foam, But that would be too expensive if bought from Amazon.



    Screenshot from 2019-08-15 20-04-22.jpg

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Moscow
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    Quote Originally Posted by Armoured View Post
    The other things you can do are plant cover crops - grechka (buckwheat), mustards, clovers, whatever - that root down and loosen up the soil and feed microbes. These are all supercheap at the usual garden spots and a lot cheaper than 'grass seeds' (ie the stuff you buy to make a proper lawn). It's really useful to do this when trying to get rid of the stinging nettles because something needs to grow there instead of the nettles, otherwise you'll just get other weeds growing in place.

    One interesting approach is to buy tillage or forage radishes - basically these are similar to Daikon. You sow them around this time of year and they die in the fall (or you cut them before the frost). They grow enormous deep radish roots - and when they die in the fall the huge radish roots rot in the soil and break up the harder soil for you leaving these pockets that other plants love. The seeds are harder to find and I can't remember what they're called in Russian but they're not expensive. (I recall I bought a bunch of seed stuff that was cheap in bulk online - they'd be even cheaper if you bought them in kolkhoz quantities)
    After several years of moderate planting and sort-of maintaining parts of a lawn, was looking around today.

    Best bang for buck: clover seeds. Mix green and red if you can. Cheap in bulk and integrates well with a traditional lawn but provides variety and not quite so picky about being mowed frequently. Get a mix and toss around in different places, looks good, good for soil too (sucks in nitrogen). Best thing about clover: it will get established in good areas and come back year after year and require no work whatsoever, apart from the mowing you were going to do anyway. Bees and local insects like it. It also tends to grow well around other plants/gardens without disturbing them - doesn't insist on being the only damn plant like grass.

    Close to that: white mustard seeds. Very cheap even not in bulk (a couple bucks for a couple kilograms), will seem to seed in almost any soil (biggest dependence is at least some sun), so e.g. bad soil, rotting wood chips, piles of leaves that haven't fully broken down, etc. Let it grow as little or as much as you like, has pleasant enough flowers, if it gets mowed down before flowering, no big deal. Also considered a 'green manure' (one reason it's cheap). I don't think mustard comes back each season unless it goes through full flowering/seed cycle (so you can avoid it if you want).

    Boht of the above will at least make an attempt to grow under trees, although some combination of competing for resrouces (water/sun) will keep them from growing well.

    Next, various 'green manure' (sideraty?) mixes which might include buckwheat oats clover mustard some vetches and who knows what. Overall cheap enough to help displace stuff you don't like.

    Least favourite: actual grass seed. Overpriced and some of it grows well, some of it doesnt. My best results have been from casting some about from time to time, along with other stuff like clover, but clover does better.

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