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Thread: Property Inspectors? & Buying a House in General

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Armoured View Post
    I believe the technology in this place is manufactured beams - it's not just wood beams, but also (usually) not insulated separately. (It can be done after, if really needed, but not what's planned).

    These 'brus' are basically solid manufactured wood, i.e. made from other wood, dried, glued, cut, pressed, etc. They are much denser than just wood beams. Additional insulation supposedly not required, I think it's a finnish tech but not sure.

    The main feature of these things is thickness - 15-20cms of this stuff. Fit together better than solid wood because manufactured, should not settle / warp like real wood. So main thing is if the beams are manufactured properly - key part of which is drying. I wouldn't know how to check the quality.

    If thick enough, doesn't necessarily need additional insulation - obviously also if all air gaps dealt with (which there should be few of).

    I'm not trying to sell it, just noting the technology is different. Friends have it and like it, but I don't know more than that about real world use.

    The video above is mostly wood frame - good if well done, can be done badly.

    Yeah, it looks a 'brus' house, but not a very thick one, I have a 'brus' house, it's thicker than the one linked, no insulation needed, but if 15cm, I would seriously consider putting rockwool on the outside and cladding.
    I have seen other 'brus' houses with really shitty workmanship, huge gaps, massive heat loss, such houses need more cladding, one house was built so bad with heat loss, monthly electric bill in winter was 40k + ru, a month( no gas in my village)

    The Canadian style(I think that's what it's called) here is popular(cheap), a kinda plastic cladding.

    something like this,
    http://www.vinylcladding.co.nz/
    Nick, there are lots of types, are you after a wooden house?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Wally View Post
    Every house I ever built we put tar paper on the outside and wood shingles over that. Keep the wooden walls from getting wet. As far as Rockwool insulation we used a staple gun and stapled it, that's what the extra folded paper on the edges is for.
    When I put rockwool on the outside of a summer hut to winterize it, I made wooden frames then placed the rockwool into the frame.
    There is also something called XPS rigid foam, easier to use than rockwool


    something like this


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    Quote Originally Posted by Judge View Post
    Yeah, it looks a 'brus' house, but not a very thick one, I have a 'brus' house, it's thicker than the one linked, no insulation needed, but if 15cm,
    What's your thickness? 20X20cm?

    I would seriously consider putting rockwool on the outside and cladding.
    On outside? Well, I'd prefer those panels you put elsewhere if on the exterior. But sure there's a way to make that work too.

    I have seen other 'brus' houses with really shitty workmanship, huge gaps, massive heat loss, such houses need more cladding, one house was built so bad with heat loss, monthly electric bill in winter was 40k + ru, a month( no gas in my village)
    Yep. Bad workmanship trumps tech.

    There is also something called XPS rigid foam, easier to use than rockwool
    Similar approach from the other side: use a type of rigid foam blocks/panels and stick them inside woodframe gaps instead of rockwool, cut to size for each gap. Then foam around the edges to get better airseal. Tighter fit, no air passage through the material, won't sag or compress or become useless if it gets damp.

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    What's your thickness? 20X20cm?
    185mmX 200MM, went this way instead of round log cos didn't want to wait a year for the logs to settle down.

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    http://eng.crocus-expo.ru/exhibition/plan.php
    anyone want to build, repair or do somethign around -your own- house, check out the calendar here and go and have a look and check there. it definitely is worthwhile ( maybe there others around town as well, i take Krokus Expo, because it is just across the MKAD from Strogino. And walking distance from home...)
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

  9. #21
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    Regarding 'brus' , it's really important where it comes from, which factory and their reputation of good wood.

    Nick, if you plan to build a wooden house from scratch, I recommend to go with a decent company with a track rrecord and let them do all works, not just wood works but foundation, roof, electric wiring and plumbing.
    Also, if you get an independent project manager who just works for you and overseas the build, this is an extra cost but worth it, if you know a thing or two about building then you could skip having a project manager.

    Going through a company that does all turn key fot you is costly, they add extra costs to such things as wiring, pipes and what not, these thing's can be bought cheaper by you, but it's time consuming, they will have a list of what's needed, a trip or two to Leroy Merlin, save money.

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  11. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judge View Post
    Regarding 'brus' , it's really important where it comes from, which factory and their reputation of good wood.
    I echo that. When we were planning to build, it became clear quickly that there are a lot of companies making brus. It's not a particularly complicated technology but (as a result?) there's wide variance in quality, it can be made in almost backyard factories. The quality of the inputs and processes matters a lot.

    That said, not clear whether nick wants to build or buy something already made. Both have their advantages and disadvantages and risks, there's no free lunch. My own experience, one advantage of a place that was built some years before and been lived in is you can see what issues (at least to some degree). Building your own is a great option, too, but can require a lot of time and effort to control the process. We ended up choosing not to build because we happened to find something on the market that worked, and there was an unrelated legal issue for the land plot we wanted to build on; I don't think there's any way to say whether that was the 'best' choice, just that it worked.

    Back to original question, unfortunately there's no institution I know of that's comparable to good property inspectors in some markets. You can approximate by finding someone with the right background (building/construction) to take a look at it.

    One thing to keep in mind is: unless your budget is unlimited, there's no perfect house or property, you can only try to be informed about what trade-offs, risks, inconveniences. And try not to be paralyzed looking for the 'best' - definitely an area where the perfect is the enemy of the good. Some imperfections or issues can be fixed or improved without too much trouble or expense, some are money (and time) pits.

    (Actually even people with pretty unlimited budgets also complain)

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