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Thread: It took nearly 7 months, but I got my TRP and registration

  1. #1
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    It took nearly 7 months, but I got my TRP and registration

    In retrospect it was fairly easy, but that was due to the fact that I have a Russian speaking wife who did all the hard work

    Lessons learned:
    1) Read the posts here on the forum, they help demystify the process
    2) If the migration office offers a service to fill in the forms for you, use it. It's not too expensive and seems to help further down the line. However, do check and double check that all dates are correct and also that all spellings and transliterations are also correct and consistent. Certainly in Krasnodar where I made my application, they were much more used to filling in applications from residents of the former republics, including Ukraine, rather than Europe.
    3) If you have more than one nationality, and mention it on the application form, make sure you have all documents relevant to that country as well. I have dual nationality, British and Belgian. I was making the application as a Belgian and had all my Belgian documents apostilled, translated and notarised. I then lost nearly 3 weeks having to get the same set of documents from the UK.
    Interestingly, they only seemed to be interested in places where I had citizenship, not where I had previously lived. I did NOT offer this suggestion to the staff processing my documents and suggest you also refrain.
    4) Be patient and be prepared to have to make a visa run. When I arrived in Russia in February this year, I was travelling on a 3 month private visit visa. I was therefore a bit upset when I was told that the process would take 5 to 6 months to complete, since it meant that I had to leave the country again and live in "exile" for at least 3 months until my request was approved.
    5) The migration office sent me a letter to my home in Russia to advise me that the request had been approved and that I could go to my local police station to get all the stamps, etc. That letter took over 2 weeks to be delivered! Despite being told I could follow progress on the website (https://pda.guvm.mvd.ru/services/trp) nothing ever showed up.
    My local police station advised it was easier to go directly to the offices in Krasnodar. But only on Tuesday mornings, between 9 and 10. So that's what I did. I handed in my passport and was told to return 3 hours later. During that time, they had cancelled my private visit visa and issued a new one, valid for 3 years expiring on the anniversary of the approval of my TRP as well as the TRP stamps..
    6) Once the TRP is issued (that is stamped in your passport) you have to register within 7 days. Registration itself was relatively painless and only required one trip back home (fortunately only a 10 minute walk) to fetch the copy of my fingerprints that I had received when I submitted my TRP request. It seems that computer systems that can be accessed by all services are not yet in use here.

    The TRP is valid for three years, but I have to renew my registration each year.

    In total and not counting the time it took to get the documents ready, it has taken from mid-March when my TRP request was submitted and accepted to today to get all the stamps in my passport.

    Next steps are, in 6 months time, to make my request for permanent residency and then once that is sorted, citizenship. I thought that I would be able to make a request directly for citizenship without going through the PRP process using the so-called simplified procedure. However, no-one here in the Krasnodar region seems to have heard of of it, which is not really a good sign and, in any case, I have read conflicting articles about whether the request can be made with only TRP completed or whether PRP is also required.

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to BigBear For This Useful Post:

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  3. #2
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    Thanks, comrade, for sharing the experience.
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  4. #3
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    good for you! and good luck to do the PRP now. looks like quite different from what I did here in Moscow. But as I said before, each - organisation- seems to have their own laws. never mind what Moscow says...
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

  5. #4
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    Great! Congratulations! It's nice to hear such a recent success story. I'm set to receive TRP at the end of November (currently doing my second visa run since I started the process &#128514. I read that a law was being considered that would automatically give the exit visa with TRP like you got. Does anybody know if that's actually standard now? That would be very nice. It seems like you were lucky to get the visa so fast. As far as I know, by law, they have up to 20 days to do it.

  6. #5
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    Congratulations BigBear! I took the same path you are on, got the permanent residency and after that, citizenship. I'm glad I did.

    When I got my temporary residency, I looked into the "accelerated" path to citizenship. At the time, it was set up to simplify the process of getting citizenship for people of Russian descent who are citizens of another country. I googled ускоренное российское гражданство just now and as far as I can tell, this is still true today. I don't have Russian parents so I had to do it the normal way, by getting the TRP, then the PRP and finally, citizenship.

    Once you apply for citizenship, feel free to pick my brains. It's not a complex process, involving mostly documents you've already obtained. You will need a apostilled birth certificate. I did find that the migration officials went through my application for citizenship with a fine tooth comb, rejecting things that had been accepted when I applied for residency. The citizenship application seemed to cause the inspectors to achieve heroic levels of scrutiny. An early application of mine was rejected because I used "отчество" for "middle name" in a Russian translation instead of "второе имя". In a later application I was told not to use "второе имя" because only patronymics are used in Russia. In the end "второе имя" was accepted in the translation because in Russia, the law does allow use of a middle name by Russian citizens in case someone doesn't know his or her father. I also wrote down the name and phone number of the inspector who gave me the first opinion and gave it to the inspector who provided the second one. The matter went to a supervisor and that did the trick. This discussion about middle names caused a delay lasting several months. That, however, is behind me now. With citizenship, you can say good-bye to the migration officials once and for all.

    You will be fine though, being patient.
    Last edited by xt-tsi; 13-10-2018 at 09:04.

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by xt-tsi View Post
    The citizenship application seemed to cause the inspectors to achieve heroic levels of scrutiny. An early application of mine was rejected because I used "отчество" for "middle name" in a Russian translation instead of "второе имя". In a later application I was told not to use "второе имя" because only patronymics are used in Russia. In the end "второе имя" was accepted in the translation because in Russia, the law does allow use of a middle name by Russian citizens in case someone doesn't know his or her father.
    Thanks for the heads-up xt-si; I remember reading your posts about that.

    I have two forenames but nearly all my documents from Russia have combined them such that my имя here has become Джон Жак, which is a bit annoying as I have never been called by my middle name throughout my life. And just to rub it in, Sberbank then transliterates this into one word “Johnzhak” on my bank cards!

    It’s not something that is unique to Russia. I had similar issues when I lived in the United Arab Emirates. But at least they managed to call me John

  9. #7
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    Yes, spelling can go haywire, in Russia as well where the bureaucrats prefer their own spelling.

    When my great grandparents immigrated to the US from Slovakia, their last name was changed from Potochnik to Ptosnak for reasons known only to some unknown bureaucrat. It's not as if Ptosnak is a simplified version of the original. My grandfather changed our last name to a non-Slavic version and our Ptosnak relatives in New Jersey have had nothing to do with our side of the family ever since.

    The first English version of the spelling used for my name in my Russian passport was different from my US passport. I asked to get it changed and the migration officials agreed. They were very obliging. Now my name is identical on all my passports. I thought it made sense - to avoid confusion at the airport when checking in and going through security.

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  11. #8
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    BigBear
    Джон Жак = Ваня Яша

    Don't take this too close to your heart, as we say. Bureaucracy
    Another Russian proverb - you can name me a pot, but don't put into an oven.

    xs-tsi
    Yes, the transliteration by bureaucrats varies. My 1st Russian intl passport (yet on USSR blank) I received from OVIR at Berezhkovskaya nab., in 1998, there I was Andrei.
    Then in 5 years I received another Russian intl passport at FMS at Profsoyuznaya ul., also paper one, but already with Twinhead Eagle. There I was Andrey.

    Then at FMS at Fruktovaya ul. in 5 years I've received 5-yr biometric chipped passport with Andrei again.

    When exhausted, in 2013 I've received 10-yr biometric chipped passport with Andrei at the same place, but in 2015 they've closed FMS passport office at Fruktovaya and relocated to Мои документы at Odesskaya.

    Waiting for 2023

    You said, Potochnik? Wasn't Herman Potochnik, from Austria-Hungary, missile engineer-designer of 192x, your relative?
    Last edited by FatAndy; 13-10-2018 at 18:31.
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  13. #9
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    I don't know if Herman Potochnik was my relative, probably not. We ost track of our Slovakian relatives.

    Anyway, my Slovakian grandfather married a woman from Ireland and my grandparents on my mother's side were 100% Swedish. Not much Slovakian left.

  14. #10
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    Does FMS take original notarized apostilled passport and marrige certificate translations or just copies? If they take originals how many of them did you get from notary/translators? I would like to get these documents translated one time and make enough of them to notarize if we need to give them to FMS or other officials. This will save time and money on translation.
    Last edited by seaworld; 31-10-2018 at 19:55.

  15. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by seaworld View Post
    Does FMS take original notarized apostilled passport and marrige certificate translations or just copies? If they take originals how many of them did you get from notary/translators? I would like to get these documents translated one time and make enough of them to notarize if we need to give them to FMS or other officials.
    they only take copies.( i do copies always at home on my Mac) but want to see the original as well. the only thing- documents they take originals are letters from the bank, med certificates or police clearance. these three things are anyway valid only for 3 month or so. so not much use to have them at home afterwards. though also from these documents i make copies, just in case. one never knows...
    Where I live, the Inspector looked at my original passport, the notarized version and returned both to me. and kept the copy. same with the marriage certificate. But since I got married in Russia, it was anyway all in local lingo, no apostille needed.
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

  16. #12
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    Thanks Benedikt. It's a relive. I assume clinics where he will get his tests done also take only copies and see originals. What about russian language test? I am sure he cannot pass that. Any suggestions?

  17. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by seaworld View Post
    Thanks Benedikt. It's a relive. I assume clinics where he will get his tests done also take only copies and see originals. What about russian language test? I am sure he cannot pass that. Any suggestions?
    Ha! Ha, ha ha!

    All you have to do is learn to sing the Russian National anthem. You don't even need to learn Russian.
    If you trust the government you obviously failed history class. " George Carlin"

  18. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Wally View Post
    Ha! Ha, ha ha!

    All you have to do is learn to sing the Russian National anthem. You don't even need to learn Russian.
    It means no way? Hmm. I guess Russian lesson after work tonight.

  19. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by seaworld View Post
    Thanks Benedikt. It's a relive. I assume clinics where he will get his tests done also take only copies and see originals. What about Russian language test? I am sure he cannot pass that. Any suggestions?


    correct. also, clinics take only photocopies. Your friend should go to Sakharov and do the test there. They are not done to make a person fail on purpose or just for fun. but a certain minimum amount of Russian language he will need to know. there are sites on the internet, I beleive the links are also to be found here. where you can see what is wanted,needed and what they will ask. No one ecpects your friend to read Pushkin and receite it. But a minimum on conversation, some history of Russia, the government and no,no one is asking that he must be able to sing the Russian anthem.Though it would be nice to remember at least the first verse. (первый стих).Honestly I do not know how it is with tests done at the university or a private accredited school or the likes ( for me the question never came up, first because i know the language more or less fluent, second because of my age (limit) i did not need it anymore.) But whatever you or your friend will do, do everything legal, it for sure will help later. because these -helpers- might be here today and gone tomorrow. here is a link and three modules that can be downloaded and learned for the PRP.https://www.accountor.ru/en/news/201...-test-examples
    There is no greater treasure then pleasure....

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