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Thread: US ‘kidnaps’ Russian MP’s son to ‘exchange him for Snowden’

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    US ‘kidnaps’ Russian MP’s son to ‘exchange him for Snowden’

    http://rt.com/news/171188-russian-ha...apped-america/


    US ‘kidnaps’ Russian MP’s son to ‘exchange him for Snowden’
    Published time: July 08, 2014 10:39
    Edited time: July 08, 2014 15:40



    A Russian MP claims the US kidnapped his son from the Maldives on bogus cyber-fraud charges and may be preparing to offer him as bait in a swap deal for Edward Snowden.

    Roman Seleznyov, 30, was arrested at Male international airport as he was about to board a flight to Moscow. He was forced by US secret service agents to board a private plane to Guam and was later arrested. The Russian ministry slammed his detention as “a de-facto kidnapping.”

    Moscow considers the kidnapping "a new hostile move by Washington,” and accused the US of ignoring proper procedure in dealing with foreign nationals suspected of crimes.

    “The same happened to Viktor Bout and Konstantin Yaroshenko, who were forced to go to the US from third countries and convicted on dubious charges.”

    Foreign Ministry outraged by #Russian citizen's detention by #US secret service in #Maldives - http://t.co/PnStTwIjWD

    — MFA Russia (@mfa_russia) July 8, 2014

    In an interview to RT Russian MP Valery Seleznyov, Roman’s father pointed to the illegality of the US kidnap.

    “For all I know they may be demanding a ransom tomorrow. Or try to exchange him for [NSA whistleblower Edward] Snowden or somebody. One can only wonder.”

    He cannot contact his son and claims American authorities are denying Roman his rights.

    “They took him to Guam because American law is not fully applicable there,” the lawmaker explained.

    The MP said that his son has scant computer skills and could not be involved in any sort of hacking.

    Valery Sleznyov (RIA Novosti / Vladimir Fedorenko)

    The US Department of Justice and US Secret Service announced Monday that Roman Seleznyov was indicted on charges including identity theft, bank fraud, illegally accessing information on protected computers and trafficking in unauthorized access devices.

    He is charged with stealing and selling US citizens’ credit card data between 2009 and 2011 and may face up to 30 years in prison if found guilty.

    Seleznyov appeared in court on Monday, and will be held in custody until his next hearing in two weeks.

    “This important arrest sends a clear message: despite the increasingly borderless nature of transitional organized crime, the long arm of justice – and this Department – will continue to disrupt and dismantle sophisticated criminal organizations,” Jeh Johnson, Secretary of Homeland Security, said in a statement.

    The Secret Service called Seleznyov “one of the world's most prolific traffickers of stolen financial information.”

    The Russian’s “scheme involved multiple network intrusions and data thefts for illicit financial gain," said the director of the Secret Service, Julia Pierson. "The adverse impact this individual and other transnational organized criminal groups have on our nation's financial infrastructure is significant and should not be underestimated.”

    It is not the first time Mr Seleznyov has been in the news - he was injured in a 2011 bomb blast in Marrakech, Morocco.

    The US has a record of taking drastic steps when it wants people held in custody. The methods may vary from the widely-criticized practice of “extraordinary rendition,” or the blatant kidnappings of terror suspects during the Bush era, to putting pressure on foreign governments to allow American agents a free hand on their soil.

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    A slightly different version of the story

    08
    Jul 14
    Feds Charge Carding Kingpin in Retail Hacks

    http://krebsonsecurity.com/2014/07/f...ks/#more-26782


    The U.S. Justice Department on Monday announced the arrest of a Russian hacker accused of running a network of online crime shops that sold credit and debit card data stolen in breaches at restaurants and retailers throughout the United States.

    The government alleges that the hacker known in the underground as “nCux” and “Bulba” was Roman Seleznev, a 30-year-old Russian citizen who was recently arrested by the U.S. Secret Service.

    Seleznev was initially identified by the government in 2012, when it named him as part of a conspiracy involving more than three dozen popular merchants on carder[dot]su, a bustling fraud forum where Bulba and other members openly marketed various cybercrime-oriented services.

    According to Seleznev’s own indictment, which was filed in 2011 but made public this week, he was allegedly part of a group that hacked into restaurants between 2009 and 2011 and planted malicious software to steal card data from store point-of-sale devices.

    The indictment further alleges that Seleznev and unnamed accomplices used his online monikers to sell stolen credit and debit cards at bulba[dot]cc and track2[dot]name. Customers of these services paid for their cards with virtual currencies, including WebMoney and Bitcoin. As explained in the screen shot below, the track2[dot]name site stopped accepting new members in 2011, and new applicants were directed to bulba[dot]cc, which claimed to be an authorized reseller.

    Recently, however, track2[dot]name began accepting new members who agreed to pay up-front deposits. The deposits ranged from one bitcoin (about $624 USD) for a basic account, to 20 bitcoins (roughly $12,484 USD) for a “corporate” account that is eligible for generous volume discounts and lengthy replacement times for purchased cards that turn out later to be canceled by issuing banks.

    Bulk buyers also were a big part of the typical clientele that shopped at bulba[dot]cc. In 2013, the carder[dot]su crime forum was compromised, and a copy of it was obtained by law enforcement and by several security researchers (including this author). Prosecutors alleged that Seleznev also was responsible for maintaining the “Bulba” user account on that forum, and judging from the hundreds of private messages that Bulba responded to from interested buyers, more than a few of them were looking to buy huge quantities of stolen cards.

    *screenshots here in original article*


    Random mixes of 100 cards from American Express, Visa, MasterCard and Discover fetched $1,300 ($13 per card), while “megamix” collections of 1,000 randomly chosen cards sold for $8,000 ($8 per card). Buyers typically have groups of “runners” at their disposal, each of whom fan out to various big box retailers and use the fabricated cards to purchase high-dollar gift cards, electronics and other items that can be re-sold quickly for cash.

    A statement by Washington State U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan notes that Seleznev’s first court appearance was in Guam, an unincorporated territory of the United States in the western Pacific Ocean. A spokesman for the Secret Service declined to say where Seleznev was arrested, but it’s a good bet that he was apprehended while traveling somewhere outside of his home country.

    Russian hackers targeting American businesses are generally safe from arrest and prosecution provided they don’t target their own countrymen or travel internationally, and the Russian government has not recently been known to assist foreign law enforcement agencies in arresting its own citizens.

    Update, July 8, 8:41 a.m. ET: This Reuters story cites Russian media saying that Seleznev was arrested in the Maldives, and that he may be the son of a member of the Russian parliament.

    This statement, from the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, confirms that Seleznev was arrested (the Russian government says “kidnapped”) in the Maldives as he was headed back to Moscow. The ministry said that the Maldives, “contrary to the existing rules of international law, have allowed an intelligence agency of another state to kidnap a Russian citizen and take him out of the country. We demand that the Government of the Maldives to provide the necessary clarifications. Given these circumstances, we again strongly encourage our countrymen to pay attention to the warnings posted on the Web site of the Russian Foreign Ministry, regarding the risks which are associated with foreign travel, if there is a suspicion that U.S. law enforcement agencies can tie them to any claim.”

    Original story:

    Seleznev and others named as part of the carder.su conspiracy are being charged under the federal Racketeering Influenced Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, a law which allows prosecutors to hold every member of a criminal organization individually responsible for the actions of the group as a whole.

    Many named in the multi-count carder.su indictment have already been arrested, pleaded guilty or found guilty by a jury, such as David Ray Camez, a 22-year-old who didn’t have much in the way of assets or riches (PDF) to forfeit after his conviction, unless you count PVC card embossers, hot-stamping machines, dozens of phones and computers.

    Another member of the conspiracy, Cameron “Kilobit” Harrison of Georgia, pleaded guilty to federal racketeering charges in April 2014. Kilobit is the same carder.su member asking Bulba in the above screenshot about the price of purchasing stolen cards in packs of 1,00.

    For more on how these carding shops work, check out my story from last month, “Peek Inside a Professional Card Shop.”

    A copy of the indictment against Seleznev is available here (PDF).

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    Isn't like 60% of the Russian economy based on pirating, bootlegging, and selling other people's things?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MilkandGin View Post
    Isn't like 60% of the Russian economy based on pirating, bootlegging, and selling other people's things?
    Do you envy, comrade?
    All the world's Kremlin,
    And all the men and women merely agents

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    I can see why this hits a nerve, if Russians involved in dubious practices can't even go to the Maldives anymore for fear of getting arrested, that hurts more than economic sanctions possibly could! At least there's always Cuba, not quite as upscale though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JanC View Post
    I can see why this hits a nerve, if Russians involved in dubious practices can't even go to the Maldives anymore for fear of getting arrested, that hurts more than economic sanctions possibly could! At least there's always Cuba, not quite as upscale though.
    Who says involved in dubious practices? I wouldn't trust the USA on anything.

    The USA is a total disgrace on law and order in case you didn't know. For examples, the CIA will take men off the street for no reason and sodomise them.
    This guy had done nothing wrong at all, just had the same name as someone on one of the USA wanted lists. They grabbed(kidnapped) him off the street, sodomised him and took him to a remote illegal jail for 5 months. he had wife and 6 kids, the wife thought she had been abandoned and left germany. link below.

    http://www.theguardian.com/law/2012/...terror-suspect

    The above is just one of many many examples of the USA way of living.

    Another link, police at work in USA:
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7fY_uZ8bec"](FULL) Cop Punching Woman in Head on LA Freeway - YouTube[/ame]

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    Quote Originally Posted by JanC View Post
    I can see why this hits a nerve, if Russians involved in dubious practices can't even go to the Maldives anymore for fear of getting arrested, that hurts more than economic sanctions possibly could!
    What sanctions? Our foreign ministry has issued the special warning several months ago about such "threats". If someone hacked American banks and didn't read the warning - they're angry Buratinos to themselves.
    All the world's Kremlin,
    And all the men and women merely agents

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    Quote Originally Posted by rumple_stilskin View Post
    Who says involved in dubious practices? I wouldn't trust the USA on anything.
    I wouldn't either, but I don't think straight up Russians have much to fear at this point. Apparently this guy had been marked years ago, not last week.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JanC View Post
    I wouldn't either, but I don't think straight up Russians have much to fear at this point. Apparently this guy had been marked years ago, not last week.
    What is a 'straight up russian'?

    The USA abuses the due process of the legal system to harras political opponents worldwide, but then criticises others for doing it - what hipocracy.

    Having fellow citizens targeted by the USA is something to fear. Who wants the USA to interfere in Russian society at all?

    Who knows, maybe he had broken some laws but the USA won't give him justice for sure.

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