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Thread: Question for fellow teachers about the situation in Moscow

  1. #1
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    Question for fellow teachers about the situation in Moscow

    1) I have noticed that there is a shortage of teachers here. Is it just me?
    2) Unfortunitely the families looking for teachers all want you to come to their home close to Metro Altuf’evo, Mitino, Tiply Stan, etc… and have a lesson from 5pm - 630pm, no earlier, no later. I have decided to give lessons out of my apartment near Metro Kievskaya (5 Minutes by foot from metro) in an effort to eliminate transit times between students. I can give up to three lessons an evening as opposed to just one. Unfortunately, these families still want the teacher to come to them, and monopolize our whole evening. I mean what? Should we charge them 5 or 6000 Rubles per lesson and explain if we come to you, you are our only student and we need to pay rent. Else you can come to me???
    3) Also, who thought of this "ACADEMIC" hour non-sense? Does this only exist in Russia.

    What are your thoughts?

  2. #2
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    1) It's not just you, there is a seemingly endless supply of people wanting to learn English.
    2) Sure it would be nice to work from home, but people mostly have to travel to their jobs, and lots of travelling is the lot of a private teacher, I think. If you think about it from the student's point of view, it makes sense that they would prefer their teacher to come to them. They've done a day's work/schooling, now they're going to be working hard for another 1.5 hours, and paying for the privilege. If they can avoid it, why would they want to add an hour's travelling onto their day?
    3) In Russian schools, lessons are 45 minutes long, hence the "academic hour". This is how people are brought up here, so it makes sense to them. If it confuses you, stop saying "an hour" and start talking about "45 minutes" or "60 minutes" instead.

  3. #3
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    I have to admit that I enjoy going round to people's offices and homes - it gives me a bit more information about where real Russians live and work. I also enjoy seeing different areas of Moscow. I've found that in places where I had to do this kind of travelling, I tend to understand the culture better.

    For example, in Moscow, I've learned to look behind gates and in courtyards for shops and offices; I don't look for business signs any more; I've witnessed some elaborate security procedures; and I've been to the homes of the wealthy and middle class (I haven't actually had a poor student yet).

    However, you're right in that although you can theoretically teach several hours a day, in practice your students want you in the early morning, in the evening and at the weekend!

  4. #4
    rubyrussia is offline Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
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    Hey Ian,

    I'd say you should get used to offering a product or service that is convenient to your potential students and not the other way around. In Moscow, people tend to be more often short on time rather than money. I guess if you're in some provincial town you could have the opposite situation on your hands.

    Also, I've never heard of someone charging 5,000 or 6,000 for a lesson. What qualifications do you have to teach English?

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