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Thread: Day trip to Vladimir?

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    Day trip to Vladimir?

    I'm a tight-budgeting student in Moscow and I'm wondering how realistic it is to make a day-trip to Vladimir. I know there's an early morning elektrichka that runs on weekends but is there return transport that leaves late enough to give me a few solid hours in the town?

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    Quote Originally Posted by hannahbanana View Post
    I'm a tight-budgeting student in Moscow and I'm wondering how realistic it is to make a day-trip to Vladimir. I know there's an early morning elektrichka that runs on weekends but is there return transport that leaves late enough to give me a few solid hours in the town?
    Why not to try the same elektrichka? Check the time-table

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    Samodika is right,the time-table will tell you the return times back to Moscow.
    For sure there will evening trains back to Moscow from Vladimir...
    Have a good time in Vladimir..

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    You are not limited only to the elektrichka

    The main Trans-Siberian line now runs through Vladimir and there are lots of direct trains in both directions.

    If budget is your concern, there are very frequent buses from Shelkovsky Bus Station (metro Shelkovskaya). Coming back on the bus is a bit of a drag, because the main destination served by the buses is Ivanovo.... sometimes they can be full already by the time they come through Vladimir, so be ready to do a bit of bobbing and weaving to get on

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    I was also going to suggest the bus or minivan, but it's not really worth saving a few rubles..You could end up standing,stuck in traffic or even better , riding in a minivan that stinks of petrol..
    Best go by train, take some drinks and snacks,and if you smoke you can join the other people between the wagons..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparafucile View Post
    Coming back on the bus is a bit of a drag, because the main destination served by the buses is Ivanovo
    Is it true what I heard about this town (Ivanovo), it's inhabited mostly by women? Russians call it "town of brides"? Yes? Correct? Why is it like this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Virtuoso View Post
    Is it true what I heard about this town (Ivanovo), it's inhabited mostly by women? Russians call it "town of brides"? Yes? Correct? Why is it like this?
    Centre of the textile industry, isn't it? Also known as the 'Russian Manchester'. And since textile mills are a more 'feminine' kind of factory (compared to coalmines or steelworks at least) they tend to employ a lot women, hence ...

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    Andy said it all.. I'd just add, I know a Russian guy married to a women from Ivanovo,I asked him about this"town of brides" .. He said ''it's true, many single women there looking for good men''.. He's not allowed to go back to visit her family cos when they go out to places to eat, 75% of the of the customers in the restaurants are all women,and they just stare at men...

    Here's an article I remember reading a few years ago about Ivanovo..It's about a Brit who found a wife there and now lives happily ever after..

    IVANOVO -- When Nick Wilsdon met his Russian wife, Anna, on the Internet, friends teased him about his mail-order bride. Turns out, he was a mail-order husband.

    Three years after first exchanging e-mails with Anna on an online dating site, the web designer from England's south coast moved to Ivanovo, Russia's "City of Brides." He and Anna are now expecting their first child.

    The Ivanovo region has the highest ratio of women to men in the country, a legacy of the Soviet textile mills that imported female workers from across the country. The city, which once helped marriage bureaus recruit young women for foreign spouses, is now enticing residents to stay and to raise families.

    That's fuelling a baby boom as Russia struggles to stem a population decline.

    "When I get in the lift of our building, I'm surrounded by so many kids it makes me think of rabbits," Wilsdon, 32, said in the 12th-floor apartment he shares with Anna, 29, in Ivanovo.

    Since the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia's population has dwindled 4.1 percent to 142.2 million. Unless fertility rates improve, the population may plunge to 128 million by 2025, the Washington-based World Bank said in November.

    By contrast, births in the Ivanovo region jumped 7.8 percent last year, four times the pace of 2006, according to national statistics.

    The number of second children in families rose by a record 24 percent, a figure more than double the Russian average.

    With the death rate declining and the outflow of people reversed, city officials expect that the population will stop shrinking this year for the first time since the Soviet era.

    Ivanovo managed to achieve the demographic turnaround by making the most of its biggest asset: women. According to government statistics, 56 percent of the city's 432,000 people are women.

    To encourage them to stay and raise children, the city has doubled the number of subsidized home loans for families, added 1,000 kindergarten spaces in two years, and built a new maternity hospital, Deputy Mayor Igor Svetushkov said.

    "We're not calling ourselves the 'City of Women,'" Svetushkov said.

    She said a bride is a "partner for life, a symbol of the family. We'd like to tell people to come here to find their happiness.''

    Other regions have had less success in boosting their birth rates.

    In Ulyanovsk, to the south of Moscow, the local government gave mothers and fathers special vacations to spend with their families -- and perhaps even expand them. Couples that have children on June 12, Russia Day, qualify to win cars and appliances in a prize drawing.


    Dmitry Beliakov / Bloomberg
    Nick and Anna Wilsdon, who met via the Internet, are expecting their first child, something very common in Ivanovo.


    The local benefits are in addition to a payment the federal government introduced about a year ago to cover education and housing costs for women who have a second child. The award is currently about 280,000 rubles ($11,900).

    Even so, the number of births in the Ulyanovsk region in 2006 is only 0.3 percent higher than in 2000. In the Ivanovo region, births are up 14 percent in the same period, according to the latest data available at the State Statistics Service.

    "It's important that the federal government takes a raft of measures to stimulate population growth, but it takes time for them to come into effect,'' said Tatyana Gurko, an expert in families at the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow. "You can't expect results immediately."

    At Ivanovo's registry office, which is located on a narrow street in the old town center, the violinist barely has time to add resin to his bow from the last performance before each couple and their guests enter to the sound of Mendelssohn's ubiquitous wedding march.

    During the summer, when the office squeezes in as many as 50 weddings a day, each couple get no more than 15 minutes for the ceremony, said Yelena Rebenkova, the registry's spokeswoman.

    Yury Krutikov, 27, a Ukrainian national, said he met his Ivanovo bride two years ago after she had divorced her previous husband, who was also from the city. He and his wife, Olga, 41, are planning to set up a club for families.

    "Her voice hypnotized me, it was like a voice from another life," Krutikov said, adding that the couple now plan to have three children. "I really want to have two girls, so that Olga can pass on all that she knows and feels to them."

    Olga Nikiforova, a 22-year-old marketing graduate and Ivanovo native, said newcomers are welcome.

    She spent several years traveling to nightclubs in other cities and dating foreign men before marrying Nikolai, a 30-year-old designer from Kostroma. She is now pregnant with her first child.

    "Because there are more women than men, Ivanovo men are used to female attention and make no effort," Nikiforova said, patting her swollen belly. "My friend Sveta, she runs after her man like a lap dog."

    Ivanovo's women are also staying home because Russia's economic boom has made the city a better place to live over the past nine years.

    Six auto dealers, including Toyota Motors, opened outlets in Ivanovo during the past 12 months. Retailers including IKEA and McDonald's have inquired about leasing space, according to the municipal government.

    "Russia's not a poor country anymore," Wilsdon said. "People that come out thinking that they'll just get a girl here who is going to be indebted to them because they pay for their plane ride to England are going to have a bit of a shock."

    Read more: http://www.themoscowtimes.com/news/a...#ixzz1o8XzxNTn
    The Moscow Times

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    Quote Originally Posted by Virtuoso View Post
    Is it true what I heard about this town (Ivanovo), it's inhabited mostly by women? Russians call it "town of brides"? Yes? Correct? Why is it like this?
    It originally picked up this soubriquet for much sadder regions. The local regiment suffered some of the heaviest losses of WW2, and very few came back at all. It was more a Town of Widows. The term "Town Of Brides" was a way of putting a brave face on this.

    It took two generations before this imbalance was corrected. Neverthless the associations with textile-weaving and clothes-making are also true, fleshing-out the 'Town Of Brides' reputation.

    I've not been in Ivanovo very extensively, but it seemed to be a perfectly normal kind of place - without any especial attractions, but with liveable infrastructure etc.

    What we haven't really mentioned is that for many people the real reason for doing to Vladimir is in fact to visit neighbouring Suzdal... the medieval monastery town (really more of a village, in fact). By contrast to Vladimir it is far smaller and sleepier... you still get a few ducks and geese wandering around the backstreets. Suzdal has more tourist sights than Vladimir (there are really only two historic churchs in Vladimir, and not much else except the Golden Gates), but only if you are interested in churches. There is also an Open-Air Museum of ancient Russian architecture (not only churches). Suzdal is 40 minutes ride by taxi from Vladimir - you can find taxis waiting on the square between the Train & Bus stations. If you are pushed for time, most of the taxi drivers can offer you a full-day price to drive you to Suzdal and take you round all the main sights there (they are a bit spread-out, so it could be worth it). There are several newish small private hotels in Suzdal if you want to make a weekend of it. There's also a Mead Tavern offering tastings of the Real Stuff

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    Fantastic. Thanks for such a story about Ivanovo, I did not know these details. Thank you.

    As for the City of Vladimir, this is Russia's old capital too, so there are three capitals in Russia - Moscow, Petersburg and Vladimir. I read in some articles today.

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    Posts/discussion about Veliky Novgorod were moved to the separate thread: http://www.expat.ru/forum/showthread.php?t=396875
    Thanks for understanding

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    Quote Originally Posted by FatAndy View Post
    Posts/discussion about Veliky Novgorod were moved to the separate thread: http://www.expat.ru/forum/showthread.php?t=396875
    Thanks for understanding
    Thank you

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    Good to see the Ivanovo Picture

    [quote=Judge;965388]Andy said it all.. I'd just add, I know a Russian guy married to a women from Ivanovo,I asked him about this"town of brides" .. He said ''it's true, many single women there looking for good men''.. He's not allowed to go back to visit her family cos when they go out to places to eat, 75% of the of the customers in the restaurants are all women,and they just stare at men...

    Here's an article I remember reading a few years ago about Ivanovo..It's about a Brit who found a wife there and now lives happily ever after..

    IVANOVO -- When Nick Wilsdon met his Russian wife, Anna, on the Internet, friends teased him about his mail-order bride. Turns out, he was a mail-order husband.

    Three years after first exchanging e-mails with Anna on an online dating site, the web designer from England's south coast moved to Ivanovo, Russia's "City of Brides." He and Anna are now expecting their first child.

    The Ivanovo region has the highest ratio of women to men in the country, a legacy of the Soviet textile mills that imported female workers from across the country. The city, which once helped marriage bureaus recruit young women for foreign spouses, is now enticing residents to stay and to raise families.

    That's fuelling a baby boom as Russia struggles to stem a population decline.

    "When I get in the lift of our building, I'm surrounded by so many kids it makes me think of rabbits," Wilsdon, 32, said in the 12th-floor apartment he shares with Anna, 29, in Ivanovo.

    Since the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia's population has dwindled 4.1 percent to 142.2 million. Unless fertility rates improve, the population may plunge to 128 million by 2025, the Washington-based World Bank said in November.

    By contrast, births in the Ivanovo region jumped 7.8 percent last year, four times the pace of 2006, according to national statistics.

    The number of second children in families rose by a record 24 percent, a figure more than double the Russian average.

    With the death rate declining and the outflow of people reversed, city officials expect that the population will stop shrinking this year for the first time since the Soviet era.

    Ivanovo managed to achieve the demographic turnaround by making the most of its biggest asset: women. According to government statistics, 56 percent of the city's 432,000 people are women.

    To encourage them to stay and raise children, the city has doubled the number of subsidized home loans for families, added 1,000 kindergarten spaces in two years, and built a new maternity hospital, Deputy Mayor Igor Svetushkov said.

    "We're not calling ourselves the 'City of Women,'" Svetushkov said.

    She said a bride is a "partner for life, a symbol of the family. We'd like to tell people to come here to find their happiness.''

    Other regions have had less success in boosting their birth rates.

    In Ulyanovsk, to the south of Moscow, the local government gave mothers and fathers special vacations to spend with their families -- and perhaps even expand them. Couples that have children on June 12, Russia Day, qualify to win cars and appliances in a prize drawing.


    Dmitry Beliakov / Bloomberg
    Nick and Anna Wilsdon, who met via the Internet, are expecting their first child, something very common in Ivanovo.


    The local benefits are in addition to a payment the federal government introduced about a year ago to cover education and housing costs for women who have a second child. The award is currently about 280,000 rubles ($11,900).

    Even so, the number of births in the Ulyanovsk region in 2006 is only 0.3 percent higher than in 2000. In the Ivanovo region, births are up 14 percent in the same period, according to the latest data available at the State Statistics Service.

    "It's important that the federal government takes a raft of measures to stimulate population growth, but it takes time for them to come into effect,'' said Tatyana Gurko, an expert in families at the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow. "You can't expect results immediately."

    At Ivanovo's registry office, which is located on a narrow street in the old town center, the violinist barely has time to add resin to his bow from the last performance before each couple and their guests enter to the sound of Mendelssohn's ubiquitous wedding march.

    During the summer, when the office squeezes in as many as 50 weddings a day, each couple get no more than 15 minutes for the ceremony, said Yelena Rebenkova, the registry's spokeswoman.

    Yury Krutikov, 27, a Ukrainian national, said he met his Ivanovo bride two years ago after she had divorced her previous husband, who was also from the city. He and his wife, Olga, 41, are planning to set up a club for families.

    "Her voice hypnotized me, it was like a voice from another life," Krutikov said, adding that the couple now plan to have three children. "I really want to have two girls, so that Olga can pass on all that she knows and feels to them."

    Olga Nikiforova, a 22-year-old marketing graduate and Ivanovo native, said newcomers are welcome.

    She spent several years traveling to nightclubs in other cities and dating foreign men before marrying Nikolai, a 30-year-old designer from Kostroma. She is now pregnant with her first child.

    "Because there are more women than men, Ivanovo men are used to female attention and make no effort," Nikiforova said, patting her swollen belly. "My friend Sveta, she runs after her man like a lap dog."

    Ivanovo's women are also staying home because Russia's economic boom has made the city a better place to live over the past nine years.

    Six auto dealers, including Toyota Motors, opened outlets in Ivanovo during the past 12 months. Retailers including IKEA and McDonald's have inquired about leasing space, according to the municipal government.

    "Russia's not a poor country anymore," Wilsdon said. "People that come out thinking that they'll just get a girl here who is going to be indebted to them because they pay for their plane ride to England are going to have a bit of a shock."

    Dear it is really nice to read about Ivanovo, i m in dubai right now and want to come to russia to learn russian language. i am also interested in textile field as i am already dealing textile stuff.

    can u tell me, is that good to learn russian in Ivanovo.

    2nd it is possible if i can earn some money in ivanovo, after 6 months when i ve some russian language knowledge by utilizing my textile skills and i can invest some money also for this purpose.

    your reply will be highly obliged

    Textiles

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    Vladimir & Suzdal

    Quote Originally Posted by hannahbanana View Post
    I'm a tight-budgeting student in Moscow and I'm wondering how realistic it is to make a day-trip to Vladimir. I know there's an early morning elektrichka that runs on weekends but is there return transport that leaves late enough to give me a few solid hours in the town?
    [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir"]Vladimir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
    [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzdal"]Suzdal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]


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