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Thread: SPOUSE VISA UK While Brit is in Russia

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    SPOUSE VISA UK While Brit is in Russia

    Has any Brit who has a Russian wife and children ever thought of starting life again in the UK. That is applying for a spouse visa as while the whole family is living in Moscow. I think this could be extremely difficult if you are not wealthy. Starting a new life in the UK from scratch is ex[ensive. But is anyone plannimg this for the future, perhaps in two years?

    I have made some enquiries about this and have some knowledge officially. but I don't have al the answers that's why I would like to hear from others.
    Last edited by Bels; 26-08-2007 at 23:33. Reason: an asddition

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    Really two sets of issues

    Your post really covers two sets of issues: the bureaucracy involved in getting spouse visas and settlement permits; and the cost of re-establishing yourself in the UK.

    The visa process is very straightforward. You do not need an attorney and so long as your marriage is on the up-and-up, the settlement visa will be issued without any problems. It also doesn't take long and you can, and should, do everything from Moscow.

    Your children may already be entitled to UK citizenship. The Embassy can advise. If they are, the application process is virtually pain-free and straight forward.

    As for re-establishing yourself in the UK, that can be expensive. It depends on your occupation and qualifications; whether you have good employment prospects; how long you have been away; and whether you have any capital to spend on a flat/house. You'll also need to find schools for your children, but can apply to your local authority for information on this.

    If you don't own property in the UK, you may well want to rent for a year or so. You should have money to cover the deposit and rent etc.

    The job market in the UK is very good at the moment, so depending on your background and experience, this should not be a major problem.

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    Yes I am fully aware of the spouse visa application. It seems straightforward and efficient. Although the cost of the application is now 800. Plus there will be costs involved in my wife getting all her papers together. We could do with that money to get established in the UK.

    Also most jobs only appear to be interested in you if you are already in the country and the area. The only way I can see myself getting back to the UK with my family is if I can get together about 15,000 plus the spouse visa costs. I also can't see any other way but for me to spend about a month in the UK away from family as I sort out some kind of base so that my wife will be applicable to fill in the spouse visa form. It's like emigrating to another country for the first time, yet it's my country.

    Still all going well I may well be ready in about two years time. We are both working very hard to achieve our target.

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    Absolutely correct regarding interviews

    You are right--most prospective employers will expect you to attend interviews in the UK and will not pay for you to travel there. Conversely, they often will pay for travel within the UK. You can post your CV on Monster and then if you get any calls (and I got MANY), you can decide whether it is worth a visit.

    I should also mention that it is possible to apply to have your spouse's visa status changed once you are in the UK. This is officially frowned upon but can be done. My personal experience is that the Home Office is easier on you if you are a professional, have a good job and income, and can come up with a plausible excuse for not applying overseas. However, this costs just as much as applying from overseas.

    One final comment: should you also happen to hold citizenship in another EU country, you can apply under the EU rules and it is free. Note that this ONLY works if you are a citizen of an EU country other than the UK. Go figure.

  5. #5
    Mvlzac Guest

    the only options.....

    Depends how soon you wanna go back, if it is asap, then you need to ask for help to someone who may give you a place in which you start looking for options there.
    If you have time, you have these options:

    a) you can design a short term project in which you must save all the money that you can; for at least giving you a living as a backpacker during two months ( I dont think that in two months you can not find a decent job even people that are illegally in your country can do it).

    b) you can communicate with someone there by any electronic media, someone that you knew, you know, had worked together and kept a healthy relationship any media and start planning opening a business, it is not so expensive and at least you may have roof for all your life, this option makes you keep your job and step safe once you decide moving. He or She will be your partner and of course will do all the paperwork there, but also you need to collaborate as your professional capabilities may.

    c) Spam your resume to 2 million companies in GB, at least one will answer you, but then you need to do at least 50% of the things mentioned in (a).


    d) think and expect that just because, you will live there as you live here, the same socio-economic level, job and your wife and kids will not see the difference in their routines.

    Of course, this is considering that at least your wife and kids will have board and room for at least 5 months here, but in Russia is not a problem, there is always one relative or babushka who takes that responsibility

    Big changes require big sacrifices....


    e) There will be a very stressed English-Russian family living in UK, nobody wants that.

    f) You keep all you have here but you always will think (what if)


    Have a nice life...

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    The UK's not that expensive

    I'm between jobs, so I've sold my house and renting a nice 4 bed house in the North West of England, half an hour from Manchester Airport for 750 a month plus 150 council tax. Living costs, say 125 a week (for 2) + a cheap car at 2k and running expenses of 100 a month. So 1500 a month? - not too high a sum to finance for say 6 months while you look for a job.

    My gf is applying to come here (to the UK) under the Highly Skilled Migrant Programme:
    > an English test at 85 (IELTS)
    > a degree validation/translation at 75 (NARIC)
    > and the fee to the Immigration Department of 400.

    That appears to be it and she gets a 2 year unlimited work visa with an option to extend to 3. After 3 years she can apply for permanent residence, and after 5 for British citizenship.

    If we were married of course, I could avoid all this palaver by bringing her in on a spouse visa, which would be much simpler.

    Of course I might yet make all this moot by getting a job in Moscow!

    Cheers
    Last edited by Malairt; 24-11-2007 at 01:50. Reason: Incompetent typing

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malairt View Post
    I'm between jobs, so I've sold my house and renting a nice 4 bed house in the North West of England, half an hour from Manchester Airport for 750 a month plus 150 council tax. Living costs, say 125 a week (for 2) + a cheap car at 2k and running expenses of 100 a month. So 1500 a month? - not too high a sum to finance for say 6 months while you look for a job.

    My gf is applying to come here (to the UK) under the Highly Skilled Migrant Programme:
    > an English test at 85 (IELTS)
    > a degree validation/translation at 75 (NARIC)
    > and the fee to the Immigration Department of 400.

    That appears to be it and she gets a 2 year unlimited work visa with an option to extend to 3. After 3 years she can apply for permanent residence, and after 5 for British citizenship.

    If we were married of course, I could avoid all this palaver by bringing her in on a spouse visa, which would be much simpler.

    Of course I might yet make all this moot by getting a job in Moscow!

    Cheers
    Is it that easy? No question about where she is living and being secure. No restrictions in the type of profession she chooses? Nothing about invitation from her employer. Will naric qualify her Russian degree? It costs because they will ask for an additional fee for translation from Russian to English.

    Reading recent newspapers, Britain is alarmed of the results of their consensus, Britain will soon have a 60 million population, with a 280 thousand internal migration. They can't cope with this and are bringing in new laws. They are even talking about restricting EU members.

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    Points of information

    I think you're mixing up various aspects of immigration to the UK - let me try and answer them, bearing in mind I'm not an expert just an individual trying to work with the bureaucracy!

    HSMP: the whole point is to encourage highly skilled people to come to the UK as our economy needs them. We don't want wasters and parasites, but people that will work and pay tax are welcome. HSMP gives you a general work visa; you can work anywhere, for anyone, for any length of time and live anywhere you want.

    A work visa is different. You have to have a job and your employer has to apply on your behalf for a visa. If you lose your job, you lose your visa and have to leave the UK. So it's much less secure, although easier to get, once you have a job of course. And getting a job in the UK when you are based in Russia is much harder than getting one when you're already actually being here.

    NARIC will evaluate her degree on line. We're sending a scanned copy to them tomorrow. 75 and they translate and evaluate where it fits in the UK education system and gives us evidence to present.

    Britain is a surprisingly popular destination for migrants (well it surprises me!) , and there are indeed 60 million people in a small space. However, successive governments have taken the view that economic migrants are in general a good thing. Studies show that migrants are more successful as a class than Brits in moving up the ladder to higher paid employment.

    New laws are continually talked about, and there is general tightening; for example grandchildren of Brits no longer have automatic right of entry. Marriages of a Brit to a foreigner no longer give automatic British citizenship: the couple have to prove that the marriage is genuine. And so on.

    The EU aspect is interesting. All EU subjects have an automatic right of residence in the UK. The only exceptions are Bulgaria and Romania who have to go through a truncated version of the work visa system: but they can still come here. Right of residence is a bedrock of the EU and cannot be amended unilaterally by any EU government.


    A good website is http://www.workingintheuk.gov.uk
    Last edited by Malairt; 25-11-2007 at 22:11.

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    In having similar as you I was already fully aware of most of what you stated.
    And had looked into it on behalf of my girle friend then and now my wife.

    However I didn't realise it was so simple, for example I thought they were selective on the professions that Britain had a shortage for. Such as Doctors, nurses and teachers. And I wasn't aware that they could enter the country to work without one invitation from one particular employer.

    Yes, they can do it on a fiance or spouse visa. But there are a lot more to be covered than what you simply listed. Such as is your fiance going to be properly accomadated. Income will come into it, but not possible income. Proof will be required.

    Yes, Britain is now talking about studying the rule and regulations that Australia has. Apparently they are much more selctive on profession.
    Also other articles I have read, Britain is not happy of how easy it is to emmigrate to certain EU countries and then have automatic right to enter Britain.

    Why is Britain most popular? A lot of immigrants second language is English. They can function best in Britain. Britain is the strongest country economically in the EU. Britain assists migrants a great deal more than other European countries.

    The British does want to lower the volume of inbound migrants into Britain, they are alarmed at the rate of inbound migrants being 280,000 a year. They can't house at this rate for example.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malairt View Post
    I'm between jobs, so I've sold my house and renting a nice 4 bed house in the North West of England, half an hour from Manchester Airport for 750 a month plus 150 council tax. Living costs, say 125 a week (for 2) + a cheap car at 2k and running expenses of 100 a month. So 1500 a month? - not too high a sum to finance for say 6 months while you look for a job.

    My gf is applying to come here (to the UK) under the Highly Skilled Migrant Programme:
    > an English test at 85 (IELTS)
    > a degree validation/translation at 75 (NARIC)
    > and the fee to the Immigration Department of 400.

    That appears to be it and she gets a 2 year unlimited work visa with an option to extend to 3. After 3 years she can apply for permanent residence, and after 5 for British citizenship.

    If we were married of course, I could avoid all this palaver by bringing her in on a spouse visa, which would be much simpler.

    Of course I might yet make all this moot by getting a job in Moscow!

    Cheers
    Prices for rent seem very reasonable in the Manchester area in comparison to the South East of England, especially near London.

    How much local knowledge do you have of this area? Is there much demand for professions in Tourism between Russia and UK for example. Is there much demand for us to establish a small school in English as a second language in this area? I'm certainly going to look into it.

    But for the first two or three years We, as a family are going to develop ourselves in Moscow Western Region, especially that I now have residency as it took us a lot of time and money to get it and I am now in the process of getting an entrepeneurs license. But most certainly I will keep investigatigating our potential of entering Britain. One thing I hope is that Britain may have a recession, and our property prices and developement of business may match Britain when we start to move there.

    A temporary British recession of course It starts to go up again as we enter
    Last edited by Bels; 25-11-2007 at 21:04. Reason: Addition of last paragraph.

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    I've lived in the North West of England for 20 odd years.

    I couldn't say I'm knowledgeable about language schools and opportunities to teach Russian. My local 6th form college (Sir John Deans, Northwich) offers Russian at A level, but I wouldn't say that Russian is popular. Outside of the big urban conurbations, I don't believe there's much demand for TEFL. My ex-wife qualified in it because she thought it would give her an advantage, but she ended up getting a job as a French and Spanish teacher.

    My gf has been looking for work while she is staying with me for a few weeks. Plenty of jobs but nobody's asking for language skills. Regrettably there seems to be zero demand for Russian speakers outside London. A friend has secured a job as PA in London with a company that has business in Russia and they wanted a Russian speaker on staff.
    Last edited by Malairt; 04-12-2007 at 16:57. Reason: adding more relevant info

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malairt View Post
    I've lived in the North West of England for 20 odd years.

    I couldn't say I'm knowledgeable about language schools and opportunities to teach Russian. My local 6th form college (Sir John Deans, Northwich) offers Russian at A level, but I wouldn't say that Russian is popular. Outside of the big urban conurbations, I don't believe there's much demand for TEFL. My ex-wife qualified in it because she thought it would give her an advantage, but she ended up getting a job as a French and Spanish teacher.

    My gf has been looking for work while she is staying with me for a few weeks. Plenty of jobs but nobody's asking for language skills. Regrettably there seems to be zero demand for Russian speakers outside London. A friend has secured a job as PA in London with a company that has business in Russia and they wanted a Russian speaker on staff.
    If you major immigration in your area then there will be demand in TEFL. Do you live in a city or near a city? check your yellow pages.

    A possibility in Russian teaching. try a classified in the most popular local newspaper seeking students. You might be pleasantly surprised and find you don't have much competition for such a possible demand. Check up the jobs available in Britain for bi-lingual Russian English or bi-lingual chinese English for example. Believe me, Top British companies are interested in both these languages for aggressive business deals. Let's not forget ex soviet countries speaking Russia who are joining the EU. The British companies want in there and are prepared to pay high salaries. In fact if you are good at any additional popular languages your prospects are very good in Britain. But, yes London is the best choice, but every city in the UK has prospects.

    The income will probably be much higher than teaching a Language

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    I live sort of half way between Liverpool and Manchester - it's not a major area for immigration. I presume there's demand for TEFL in the cities but the money's not clever and the house prices are horrendous.

    My gf has neither the patience or skill to teach Russian. I think we'll leave that to the professionals.

    We've been looking for bilingual jobs and there aren't many outside of London anyway. Even in London, most jobs seem to be PA's or admin assistants, with pay to match. That's why she's going for the HSMP, so that she can get a job that will use her professional skills.

    I wouldn't overestimate the demand for bilingual skills to carry out aggressive business deals. I used to work for a top British company and what we did was recruit bilingual Russians so that we could localise management as fast as possible. It worked too; the investment was a great success.

    A wee word of caution about ex- Soviet satellites. I spent lot of time in Poland and some in Czech and the attitude towards Russian was quite negative. Only older folks could speak some Russian, and even then it was on a par with my schoolboy French - not impressive. Anybody learning a foreign language now learns English, or perhaps German. Russian is seen as a symbol of foreign domination and not something to be proud of.

    Kazakhstan was the only ex-Soviet place I went to where Russian was widely spoken, in fact more so than Kazakh. Even there, the official policy is to teach in Kazakh, so give it 20 years and Russian will have minority status.

    I'd also question the desire of British companies to pay high salaries for expats to go to Eastern Europe. My company certainly didn't: expats were seen as expensive and of limited effectiveness. Far better to employ locals who were both cheaper and very good at what they did. I think we had around 2,000 people in Poland, with zero expats.

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    spouse visa, ielts language test

    Quote Originally Posted by Bels View Post
    Has any Brit who has a Russian wife and children ever thought of starting life again in the UK. That is applying for a spouse visa as while the whole family is living in Moscow. I think this could be extremely difficult if you are not wealthy. Starting a new life in the UK from scratch is ex[ensive. But is anyone plannimg this for the future, perhaps in two years?

    I have made some enquiries about this and have some knowledge officially. but I don't have al the answers that's why I would like to hear from others.
    hi there, i know this is an old thread, and i think i've seen you on a REAL RUSSIA forum, but i have issues with REAL RUSSIA, and UKBA, HOME OFFICE POLICY, I SENT THIS EMAIL TO MY MP, ABOUT THE IELTS LANGUAGE TEST, I WROTE IT WHEN I WAS ANGRY, BUT IT IS WHAT I BELIVE, AND HERE IT IS:
    Dear MR Betts,
    As you are the MP for my area S20 5AA, I am writing to you about what I think is a flaw in the IELTS English language test for non-EU immigrants,
    My situation is this, I have known my wife for two and a half years now since 06/01/2009, I have visited her 14 times spending 35 weeks in Moscow, and she has visited me twice, I am a welder/metal fabricator, she is a qualified Barrister, she recently applied for a settlement visa, as you know, to obtain this visa you must pass the IELTS English language test,
    my wife took the test and she acheived as score of 5 in speaking, 5 in reading, and 5 in writing,(which is more than i achieved at my school, as i went to a comprehensive school in the 70's / 80's) anyway, she got 1 in listening, and was told that this is not enough, and she failed to get her visa, and lost the 2,000 she paid , (the bigger the font, the more important to issue) anyway again, my point is, to pass the IELTS English listening test, in my opinion, you must have a very good knowledge of English words, and an excellent knowledge of english grammar, I took a sample test in listening and i got 3 points, so, as an ENGLISH man, i should not be allowed to live in my own country , as i need 4 points, as my wife said, " i cannot be with my husband because i did not pass a listening test, even though my marriage certificate (translated notarised and apostled)is a legal document,

    my own opinion is this,,,,,,

    we are a normal married couple, we are in love with each other, and miss each other very much, and if i had 1 million to invest, my wife would get her visa tomorrow, i don't have 1 million, all i have is my commitment to her, and to make her life a good life, i want to invest in my wife, because i believe in her, she is my wife, i believe it's called family values,

    the other alternative is to get a tourist visa, then disappear, like so many do, but we are normal law abiding people,

    Dear MR Betts, all i want is that my Russian Barrister wife can come and live with me, and clean toilets for a living in Meadowhall shopping centre, ( old Russian propaganda, if you go abroad you will only clean toilets)




    sorry about that, we do have a plan , for my wife to go to Sheffield collage, study English for 12 months, then go to university to study English law,

    can you help. Dean Andrew France
    Last edited by 19mmspanner; 12-09-2011 at 01:08. Reason: TO AD STUFF

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    ielts language test

    MY WIFE AND I HAVE A VERY GOOD RELATIONSHIP, WITH VERY GOOD HUMOUR, AND THE ONLY REASON MY WIFE CANNOT LIVE WITH ME IN THE UK, IS BECAUSE SHE DID NOT PASS THE LISTENING TEST, THAT CANNOT BE RIGHT,

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