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Thread: Inline Skaters - Best Stopping Technique?

  1. #1
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    Inline Skaters - Best Stopping Technique?

    Guys, maybe you can help me: I got me some inliners recently, and I'm having a great deal of fun! The only thing that doesn't work very gracefully, yet, is to slow down and stop.

    So far, and with the help of the internet, I tried several techniques with various results. And after I nearly killed the dachshund of an obnoxious old lady in the park (but it was clearly the dog's fault!) I really started to wonder, what your favorite stopping techniques are? So, I'm sure you guys made some valuable experiences since you started. Would you share them with me? Your advice would be greatly celebrated!

    And once I know how to stop properly, maybe a bunch of us could get together for a fun skating afternoon?
    Last edited by franzewich; 09-07-2010 at 01:38.

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    I don't even know a good stopping technique, but I would suppose that the best way to stop immediately is to try and change direction abruptly.

    I also think that putting your feet into a T-Position, meaning that e.g. your left foot stays straight, while your right foot is set 90 degrees to your left foot is a very popular and effective braking technique.

    I mostly use the brake itself on my right skate, but that takes a while until you've come to a stop. Therefore it is very important to look forward and be aware of any dangerous situations that might need you to stop.

    I would definitely be in for a skating afternoon!

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    Thank you, Mattology!

    Quote Originally Posted by mattology View Post
    ... I also think that putting your feet into a T-Position, meaning that e.g. your left foot stays straight, while your right foot is set 90 degrees to your left foot is a very popular and effective braking technique.

    I mostly use the brake itself on my right skate, but that takes a while until you've come to a stop. Therefore it is very important to look forward and be aware of any dangerous situations that might need you to stop.

    I would definitely be in for a skating afternoon!
    Yes, I am working on that, putting one skater in a 90 angle to the direction of travel; actually, I'm using my left leg - maybe I should follow your advice and use my right one!

    I favor that at lower speeds, to come to a complete stop, but this also tends to get me slightly off track. Besides, my body really has to be really warmed up before I can use that too stiff and immobile otherwise. Maybe practice will help!

    I should be in Moscow for a weekend end July - I will PM you for a skating event!

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    the brak pads aern't that useful...and you will quickly go through them if you use them a lot but they are ok for slowing you down but not really stopping....at slow to mid speeds the T stop, as suggested, is best...the first way of performing it isn't so hard but watch your centre of gravity before you do as you will swing around quite violently and can risk falling backwards with your momentum still trying to push you forwards ...so you need to brace and make sure your knees are bent and alsmot go into a crouch....

    another technique which is harder to master is to do like you are about to t stop but to just drag one skate, you wont spin around and stop on a dime but this is the best way to slow down rather than the brake...it is difficult to master though as you will probably put down too much pressure at first and do a t stop when you dont want one....you will need good balance and be capable of skating on one leg to do this.....you should practice your balance by skating then lifting one knee up for 3-5 seconds and going only on one leg, then return to normal skating then do the other leg....once you get confident in your balance on both legs you can skate a LOT faster and perform this slow stopping technique....one of the things i recommend is ice skating lessons...even just a few and you will be able to apply these techniques on the road.

    hope i have been of help.

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    Thank you, Yakspeare!

    Quote Originally Posted by yakspeare View Post
    ... but watch your centre of gravity before you do as you will swing around quite violently and can risk falling backwards with your momentum still trying to push you forwards ...so you need to brace and make sure your knees are bent and alsmot go into a crouch....
    ... and don't worry about that! I am already mastering the technique of flying backwards into the various samples of local botany! Rose bushes are wonderful to remind you of the essence of life - which is sometimes painful, too!

    I do appreciate you comment, though, thanks again!

  6. #6
    FlakeySnowballer Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by franzewich View Post
    Guys, maybe you can help me: I got me some inliners recently, and I'm having a great deal of fun! The only thing that doesn't work very gracefully, yet, is to slow down and stop.

    So far, and with the help of the internet, I tried several techniques with various results. And after I nearly killed the dachshund of an obnoxious old lady in the park (but it was clearly the dog's fault!) I really started to wonder, what your favorite stopping techniques are? So, I'm sure you guys made some valuable experiences since you started. Would you share them with me? Your advice would be greatly celebrated!

    And once I know how to stop properly, maybe a bunch of us could get together for a fun skating afternoon?
    Kant.ru

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    non stop skating!

    Quote Originally Posted by franzewich View Post
    ... and don't worry about that! I am already mastering the technique of flying backwards into the various samples of local botany! Rose bushes are wonderful to remind you of the essence of life - which is sometimes painful, too!

    I do appreciate you comment, though, thanks again!
    i am also practicing to stop on roller skates. i felt down last week and hurt my left elbow. it was my mistake not to wear the complete protection kit. using the T-technique to stop requires a hell of a practice. i use zig-zag turns but big turns by shifting my weight left & right, it slows me down but not immediately.

    gimme a yell when you are around, we can practice together in a small group of newbies!

  8. #8
    FlakeySnowballer Guest
    I am very curious do you use knee caps and elbow caps with a helmet?

  9. #9
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    on the one occasion I tried, I used a technique little known outside of France called 'Le piling into a Peugeot 407', later I tried the grabbing at car handles manoeuvre and to my shame passing baby buggies, by far the most effective method however, was being body checked by the father of the child whose baby buggy I had employed earlier.

    Don't drink and skate is my advice, and I wish you luck, you might have to go quite some distance before you spot a Peugeot 407 in Moscow town, so I won't be too offended if you listen to the advice of others as well.

    Matt
    The poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.

    Gilbert K. Chesterton

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrgospodin View Post
    i am also practicing to stop on roller skates. i felt down last week and hurt my left elbow. it was my mistake not to wear the complete protection kit. using the T-technique to stop requires a hell of a practice. i use zig-zag turns but big turns by shifting my weight left & right, it slows me down but not immediately.

    gimme a yell when you are around, we can practice together in a small group of newbies!
    I really learned to never (never ever!) skate without my wrist protectors! Then comes knee and ellbow protectors. The helmet, I admit, I don't wear when it's extremely hot.

    Allright, why don't you PM me if you are interested in joining in - then I will tell you when I'm around (I'm not 100% sure, yet). Might be fun to learn from each other!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt24 View Post
    on the one occasion I tried, I used a technique little known outside of France called 'Le piling into a Peugeot 407', later I tried the grabbing at car handles manoeuvre and to my shame passing baby buggies, by far the most effective method however, was being body checked by the father of the child whose baby buggy I had employed earlier.

    Don't drink and skate is my advice, and I wish you luck, you might have to go quite some distance before you spot a Peugeot 407 in Moscow town, so I won't be too offended if you listen to the advice of others as well.

    Matt
    The coccyx-bounce-and-slide manoeuvre always works for me, and it's an independent technique, not requiring the intervention of other peoples' Dads.
    Life is not what you make of it. You are what Life makes of you.

  12. #12
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    Great Weather in Warsaw - I Can Keep Practising and Practising ...

    At the moment I'm working on another thechnique, which I found quite useful at every speed:

    Doing the wedge. Since I'm a skier, that technique comes rather easy to me. But I don't know about people who don't ski?

    You kind of bend your knees inward, so that both skaters come to a slight angle to the direction of travel. By adding weight to your knees you can considerably slow down. The good thing is: you still can steer very well by shifting more weight to one leg.

    Trouble is to not touch the skaters, otherwise you come to an abrupt halt.

    Anybody familiar with this method?

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    thanks for reminding.

    Last winter I went to Sochi/Adler with couple of friends and I did skiing for the first time! My friend from USA can ski brilliantly and taught me this technique also known as "snow plow". It really helps to slow down both on skis and roller skates. This technique trembles me when in high speed! I tried taking turns which also slows me down but i can't take smaller/sharp turns which i have seen people doing.

    I took the advise from franzewich to put on the protection kit, thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by franzewich View Post
    At the moment I'm working on another thechnique, which I found quite useful at every speed:

    Doing the wedge. Since I'm a skier, that technique comes rather easy to me. But I don't know about people who don't ski?

    You kind of bend your knees inward, so that both skaters come to a slight angle to the direction of travel. By adding weight to your knees you can considerably slow down. The good thing is: you still can steer very well by shifting more weight to one leg.

    Trouble is to not touch the skaters, otherwise you come to an abrupt halt.

    Anybody familiar with this method?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrgospodin View Post
    Last winter I went to Sochi/Adler with couple of friends and I did skiing for the first time! My friend from USA can ski brilliantly and taught me this technique also known as "snow plow". It really helps to slow down both on skis and roller skates. This technique trembles me when in high speed! I tried taking turns which also slows me down but i can't take smaller/sharp turns which i have seen people doing.

    I took the advise from franzewich to put on the protection kit, thanks.
    Yes, I also know this technique as "snow plough" ("Schneepflug"). Usually for beginners, until you learn the parallel-swing. It still comes in handy when there is no space to swing, e.g. when you are approaching the queue at the ski lift a little too fast.

    I heard that on inline skaters you can also abruptly put both skates in a 90 degree angle to the direction of travel, like stopping on skis. But so far I have been too much of a chicken to try that one!

    Anybody (successfully!) done that?

  15. #15
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    Franzewich,
    there are several ways to stop on rolls:
    http://www.roller.ru/content/cat-139/article-520.html

    Standard brake usage (located at the back of right boot) is most convenient and easy to do if you're beginner.
    http://www.roller.ru/content/tormoz/article-294.html

    Then upon experience you should move to snake-way and T-stop:
    http://www.roller.ru/content/tormoz/article-551.html

    When you're profi, do power slide and parallel stop - same as T-stop but both skates parallel.
    http://www.roller.ru/content/tormoz/article-551.html - same article, points 9 and 10

    http://www.roller.ru/content/school/ - worth to read about general technics

    Everything in Russian of course

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