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Thread: Yakspeare is on The Hot Seat

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrandonL View Post
    Boxers, briefs, tighty whities, or a g-string? which do you perfer to wear?)
    i don't mind wearing boxers around the house but hate wearing them out actually underneath something...so i guess it's the g-string for me :P

    interesting cultural note....what americans call flip flops australians call thongs...which can lead to some confusion "I like a woman who wears thongs" cna have quite a different meaning between the two countries.

  2. #32
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    Have you ever thought you would like to be a person of the other gender? What are the advantages and drawbacks of being a man and a woman, in your opinion?
    festina lente

  3. #33
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    P.S. Of course, I did not mean seriously changing the gender via a medical operation! Just rather speaking about the social roles, stereotypes, psychology, etc.
    festina lente

  4. #34
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    i would totally dig being a woman...all that shopping...going to the spa and getting your body spoilt...actually i am half way there to becoming a woman...i already am quite addicted to chocolate!

  5. #35
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    Hi,
    Just out of curiosity - what do people in Krasnodar consider themselves - Cossacks, Ukrainians, Russians or Kubans(? )? Your previous post on the language intrigued me.
    Is that you in your avatar?
    Have you considered Moscow or St Pete to live?
    Is your accent recognisably Australian?
    Is there a good mix of westerners in Krasnodar?

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Periwinkle View Post
    Hi,
    Just out of curiosity - what do people in Krasnodar consider themselves - Cossacks, Ukrainians, Russians or Kubans(? )? Your previous post on the language intrigued me.
    Is that you in your avatar?
    Have you considered Moscow or St Pete to live?
    Is your accent recognisably Australian?
    Is there a good mix of westerners in Krasnodar?
    Most young locals are russians...the older generations and in particular from the villages calls themselves kubans...they don't think of themselves as ukrainian in the least...but cossack and kuban is basically interchangeable but cossack is more historical.

    yes that is me in the avatar...just don't people i am superman...trying to avoid the press and the papers you see.

    i don't think i could be a teacher in moscow- i think i would cry myself to sleep at night at my prospects of poverty or the insecurity of going freelance. all power to those who can and the idea of travelling all over moscow for lessons etc and the traffic-no thanks....i would consider moscow as a realtor though-it is a place you can certainly lead the high life if you have the money.

    st petes has always intrigued me and i think i could enjoy living there, especially without the sun( i actually don't like the sun and i am happy to run in snow and rain just not on a hot day). the history of the place and being part of it would be truly great- although i hear some bad stories about st petes too.

    my accent is British, actually from Hampshire...quite proper English....i lived there from 8-10 years of age and never lost it...though it has weakened in the last few years i use a british accent for teaching so i have regained it...i have to actually concentrate or speak to an australian to even attempt an aussie accent...overall my accent is quite neutral which is useful for teaching.

    lots of expats here in krasnodar, even an aussie with "aussie pizza " and "Kanga photoshop" etc...there is a free English club here with 300 members where local expats just meet to chat with locals in English...it is a great concept and people from many different language schools attend.

  7. #37
    Jack17 Guest
    " i actually don't like the sun and i am happy to run in snow and rain just not on a hot day"

    An Aussie who doesn't like the sun? That's like a Californian who doesn't like the sun; how is that possible?

  8. #38
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    Good for you Yakspeare.I know what you are talking about in accent. And the longer you would be here, the more you would become neutral in English accent, as you would be teaching Russians.

    However as an experienced private entrepeneur teacher, fully legal with redtape, you would soon learn not to travel around. You would soon learn to have your students near to where you live, and refuse those far from you , or at least overcharge them and put them off. As time is money, and you only get paid for the hours you work. You either visit local rich houses , or you tell them to come to your classroom, convenient for you. It is the only way, as about only 50% of potential students will not be regular and reliable, and you must take that in mind. So all experienced teachers here learn to stick local, and not run around all over the place, and sometimes trsvel to visit potential students who cancel whilst you travel. Hence for zero income. Not on! Do you agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by yakspeare View Post
    Most young locals are russians...the older generations and in particular from the villages calls themselves kubans...they don't think of themselves as ukrainian in the least...but cossack and kuban is basically interchangeable but cossack is more historical.

    yes that is me in the avatar...just don't people i am superman...trying to avoid the press and the papers you see.

    i don't think i could be a teacher in moscow- i think i would cry myself to sleep at night at my prospects of poverty or the insecurity of going freelance. all power to those who can and the idea of travelling all over moscow for lessons etc and the traffic-no thanks....i would consider moscow as a realtor though-it is a place you can certainly lead the high life if you have the money.

    st petes has always intrigued me and i think i could enjoy living there, especially without the sun( i actually don't like the sun and i am happy to run in snow and rain just not on a hot day). the history of the place and being part of it would be truly great- although i hear some bad stories about st petes too.

    my accent is British, actually from Hampshire...quite proper English....i lived there from 8-10 years of age and never lost it...though it has weakened in the last few years i use a british accent for teaching so i have regained it...i have to actually concentrate or speak to an australian to even attempt an aussie accent...overall my accent is quite neutral which is useful for teaching.

    lots of expats here in krasnodar, even an aussie with "aussie pizza " and "Kanga photoshop" etc...there is a free English club here with 300 members where local expats just meet to chat with locals in English...it is a great concept and people from many different language schools attend.

  9. #39
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    good question! much to my changrin my brother inherited the prussian skin and looks positively aboriginal in summer...the rest of are go red under the slightest bit of sunlight and my father resembles a beetroot with sucha florid complexion(the scottish half of us at work)...my greatest fear is going as red as he is and i am already pinkish...i was also born in one of the wettest and coldest areas of australia and until i was 11 i dont think i ever saw a warm summer(living in canbrerra later and in southern england)...my skin used to be bone white so by the time i realised even the virtures of having a tan(high school) it was too late....my skin hates the sun , my father has had a heap of skin cancers removed and i am also 120kg these days(approx 265 pounds) so i can stay outside in the cold all day like a mishka but struggle in the heat....in winter i was running every day in the snow(furtherest was 14km) but now after 3km i struggle and it takes me absolutely forever to cool down...quite unpleasant. i think murmansk would be the ideal place for me....

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bels View Post
    Good for you Yakspeare.I know what you are talking about in accent. And the longer you would be here, the more you would become neutral in English accent, as you would be teaching Russians.

    However as an experienced private entrepeneur teacher, fully legal with redtape, you would soon learn not to travel around. You would soon learn to have your students near to where you live, and refuse those far from you , or at least overcharge them and put them off. As time is money, and you only get paid for the hours you work. You either visit local rich houses , or you tell them to come to your classroom, convenient for you. It is the only way, as about only 50% of potential students will not be regular and reliable, and you must take that in mind. So all experienced teachers here learn to stick local, and not run around all over the place, and sometimes trsvel to visit potential students who cancel whilst you travel. Hence for zero income. Not on! Do you agree.

    well if i ever get TRP then i would go the same route as you Bels, but since that is unlikely i think a move to moscow would preclude teaching...i wouldnt work for the schools and have shared accomodation etc and too risky to go freelance on start up...if things dont work out here i will return to uzbekistan where i will shortly be able to work legally(since i have decided to marry my old girlfriend from there) and i made easy money freelancing but the biggest killer in moscow is rental prices and i wouldnt make a move there unless that was paid for and was suitable for a family. i certainly never travelled around in tashkent and made everyone come to me(excet one lady who i charged a fortune to)...so i agree with your philosophy.

  11. #41
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    YeP! You said it all! The EFL profession is unsuitable for the family working person in Russia. It is only suitable for the young single individuals who want to experience Russia, and can afford to do so. MAMM! I'm in trouble!! And I want to go home now! But I can't afford it! Help me get back. Nope! An employed EFL cannot get a responsible serious professional income in Russia. And can only look upon their income as a small back up whilst enjoying their disco and womanising times in Moscow for example. What we can do about it I don't know, apart from schools rasing their fees and paying their teachers properly. For goodness sake, The British Council managed to look after their teachers, but so far nobody else has managed to match them , both in looking after their teachers properly, and in succesfully teaching English!!!

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