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Thread: Helping the elderly

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    Helping the elderly

    Does anyone else feel... not empathy...but pure pity for the elderly here? They don't have proper nursing homes, and those that exist are only open to select people. Poor babushki and dedushki are left to beg on the street or die alone. In terms of charitable initiatives, Russia is working its way up from children and hasn't gotten very far. The Russian people themselves don't seem to care about anyone but themselves. It's sad and it is part of the reason I left my non-profit job. I felt like I was running into a wall.

    I still don't want to work in a non-profit here, for many not-very-politically-correct-or-nice-reasons but I want to explore ways to help, maybe visit and/or cook for people at one of the nursing homes. For those of us that know Russian, it would be a good way to practice. I feel a little timid about doing a meals-on-wheels type of thing, but I know it is much needed, and could be an option in the future.

    Is anyone else interested? Does anyone do this? Ideas?

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    Elizabeth, thank you. Thank for your post. I'm very interested in that kind of activity...

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    I've always said "I don't want to be here when I'm old."
    I don't see how it's possible to even put a dent in the problem. What you could do is adopt one or two old people. Adopt to whatever level you can, whether that be moving them in your house or just giving them a few hundred rubles per week.
    That is something that you will be able to see a result with. I think anything else like a soup kitchen would be nothing more than a brief gesture unless you want to work fulltime at it.

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    I am not sure that the situation here is significantly different than in many other nations, including the US. In fact in some cases I think the family structure is better preserved here. There is no better mechanism for care than someone that loves their grandparents. There are some elderly out everywhere I go but as a percentage of the population it is still pretty small.
    Certainly the pension scheme needs overhauling (I fear it is what social security will look like when I am ready to draw). But there is medical support available for everyone.
    It is not too difficult to find someone out there that just appreciates someone stopping to show they care. I try to give them a couple bills, ask if they want to go get a kartoska and cola, and just sit with them for a while bobbing my head like I almost understand something they are telling me.

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    hello

    [B]Hello

    i am happy i read this thing.....its very much sad....but i want to ask you if you want give them help i am with you ask me freely ....my english is not good but i try to write more .

    take care

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    That's great that you do try to help them.

    Maybe I am biased, as I am in a period right now where I am pretty convinced Russia is a horrible horrible place, but the situation here is totally different. Old people in the U.S. get fantastic health care. My grandmother isn't even a U.S. citizen and she got treated for lymphoma at age 90 at the mayo clinic. Her and my grandfather have nothing, but they live in a nice little apartment and get enough money from my grandfather's pension to buy books and food. I agree the family support system can be better, but that is only where it is possible. One of my coworkers' mothers died alone because neither he nor his sister had room in their apartments to take her in. She was sort of out of her mind for the last few months, and they had to turn off the water and lock up the oven so she wouldn't burn herself while she was left alone all day, except for when a woman came twice a day to feed her (her children had to pay for this).

    In the US, there are people who are specialists in aging, non-profits whose mission is to help with and work with older people, and donors who fund them. In Russia, they hardly have that for children, which the government has made a priority. I was looking into trying to do a meals on wheels type of thing here, but there is no funding for helping old people from the Russian government, and foreign aid certainly doesn't go towards helping a rotting country's population that should have been dead 5 years ago (meaning those who have lived past the age of 60!). It's not such a wise investment, when foreign aid should be having some reciprocal benefit for the donor.

    I'll look into what can be done, for those of you who have expressed interest in doing something.


    Quote Originally Posted by adamst56 View Post
    I am not sure that the situation here is significantly different than in many other nations, including the US. In fact in some cases I think the family structure is better preserved here. There is no better mechanism for care than someone that loves their grandparents. There are some elderly out everywhere I go but as a percentage of the population it is still pretty small.
    Certainly the pension scheme needs overhauling (I fear it is what social security will look like when I am ready to draw). But there is medical support available for everyone.
    It is not too difficult to find someone out there that just appreciates someone stopping to show they care. I try to give them a couple bills, ask if they want to go get a kartoska and cola, and just sit with them for a while bobbing my head like I almost understand something they are telling me.

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    You have all these people looking for free English lessons, maybe they should help elderly in exchange. Sort of pay it forward.
    Once I am back in Moscow again, I will try to help. I had a teacher of Russian that was 72 years old, and I think of her highly. It was a joy to just to hear her stories.

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    In large cities, Russia reminds of Logan's Run.
    Villages and smaller cities, the elderly are more respected and cared. IMHO

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kraven Morehead View Post
    In large cities, Russia reminds of Logan's Run.
    Villages and smaller cities, the elderly are more respected and cared. IMHO
    I'm sorry... What is Logan's Run ?

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    help the elderly.

    hi,

    i am all in for it! no wheels here to lend, but i can give my time and would love to meet the elderly.

    i am planning to help at a soup kitchen/elderly home, once i get back from the holidays (mid jan).

    if we can form a small group to do something together, that would be wonderful!

    dollyta

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    Quote Originally Posted by Korotky Gennady View Post
    I'm sorry... What is Logan's Run ?
    It's possibly one of the greatest movies ever!

    And I agree Kraven, Moscow is like Logan's like minus the carousel. How do you say 'renew' in Russian??

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    ?

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    Count Me In

    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth View Post
    Does anyone else feel... not empathy...but pure pity for the elderly here? They don't have proper nursing homes, and those that exist are only open to select people. Poor babushki and dedushki are left to beg on the street or die alone. In terms of charitable initiatives, Russia is working its way up from children and hasn't gotten very far. The Russian people themselves don't seem to care about anyone but themselves. It's sad and it is part of the reason I left my non-profit job. I felt like I was running into a wall.

    I still don't want to work in a non-profit here, for many not-very-politically-correct-or-nice-reasons but I want to explore ways to help, maybe visit and/or cook for people at one of the nursing homes. For those of us that know Russian, it would be a good way to practice. I feel a little timid about doing a meals-on-wheels type of thing, but I know it is much needed, and could be an option in the future.

    Is anyone else interested? Does anyone do this? Ideas?
    it's a great idea, elizabeth! when you organize something, let me know and i will volunteer, too.
    ALL I WANT IS TO BE WORSHIPED...IS THAT SO MUCH TO ASK?

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    Info For Volunteering With Elderly!

    Quote Originally Posted by MELODY View Post
    it's a great idea, elizabeth! when you organize something, let me know and i will volunteer, too.
    HEY, LOOK WHAT I JUST FOUND IN PASSPORT MAGAZINE!

    The Moscow Protestant Chaplaincy (MPC) is seeking volunteers for:

    SOUP KITCHEN program (This means you will serve food to poor people who go to the centre, or some location in the city. The people will go through a line like in a cafeteria and you serve them food and they can eat there.)

    ADOPT-A-GRANDPARENT program (This is also meals-on-wheels: you will deliver a food box and visit with an elderly person). Need is especially great on THURSDAYS when the food packages are assembled.
    FOR INFO, CONTACT:
    LYDIA TRONCALE, MCP DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR
    ltroncale@mpcss.ru, or visit website: indexpage

    (if you click on "index page", it takes you right to the website)
    Last edited by MELODY; 18-12-2008 at 16:49. Reason: fix web address
    ALL I WANT IS TO BE WORSHIPED...IS THAT SO MUCH TO ASK?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizabeth View Post
    Does anyone else feel... not empathy...but pure pity for the elderly here? They don't have proper nursing homes, and those that exist are only open to select people. Poor babushki and dedushki are left to beg on the street or die alone. In terms of charitable initiatives, Russia is working its way up from children and hasn't gotten very far. The Russian people themselves don't seem to care about anyone but themselves. It's sad and it is part of the reason I left my non-profit job. I felt like I was running into a wall.

    I still don't want to work in a non-profit here, for many not-very-politically-correct-or-nice-reasons but I want to explore ways to help, maybe visit and/or cook for people at one of the nursing homes. For those of us that know Russian, it would be a good way to practice. I feel a little timid about doing a meals-on-wheels type of thing, but I know it is much needed, and could be an option in the future.

    Is anyone else interested? Does anyone do this? Ideas?

    What exactly is a "meals-on-wheels"? We deliver pizza? Please be a little more specific as many would like to help.
    Last edited by is4fun; 18-12-2008 at 18:18.

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