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View Full Version : Confirmation of my brilliance



Pechorin
04-08-2008, 10:28
"The young are free of any nostalgia for the security of Soviet life a feeling common even among older Russians who have prospered since its demise."

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/03/weekinreview/03smale.html?ref=weekinreview

I know it probably annoys some of you, but I truly am in a class of my own. And I was astonished at the primitive logic and ignorance some of you display in my other thread outlining an undeniably correct thesis, that capitalism and business and markets promote human happiness and well-being, and that socialism was an ugly episode in history which benefited only loony parlor intellectuals and tyrants.
Please, before you respond, read the article (link above) and reflect for a minute or two about how much life really is better here than any other moment in history, and how much people like myself have made that possible.

Len Ganley Stance
04-08-2008, 11:07
I might be tempted to question your claims of confirmation of your brilliance, when you consider that this article appeared in the New York Times. I believe that it would be churlish to do so though as the NYT is one of the most widely read newspapers in the United States and exactly 134 people read it every day.

So instead what I will congratulate you on is the ability to use a keyboard. It must be difficult to do so without having opposable thumbs.

You are a real 'Legend In Your Own Lunchtime'

Willy
04-08-2008, 11:18
I'll put this up one more time for you listen to the words this time.

YouTube- Mose Allison - Your Mind Is On Vacation

DDT
04-08-2008, 12:41
as the NYT is one of the most widely read newspapers in the United States and exactly 134 people read it every day.
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Even a dim bulb knows that NY Times has the third largest circulation in the USA. Coming after USA Today and the Wall Street Journal. What's more he is quoting out of a Left leaning paper so you should have no trouble reading it.

Pechorin
04-08-2008, 13:03
Oh I don't think the NYT is particularly "left-wing," although some of their op-ed writers are true dumb bunnies, especially Herbert and Dowd.

And in case some of you don't get it, when I refer to my own brilliance, I am writing at least half tongue-in-cheek.

That said, I am a genius. Some of you could learn a lot by paying closer attention to my opinions, which are unusually well-informed.

Len Ganley Stance
04-08-2008, 13:08
Even a dim bulb knows that NY Times has the third largest circulation in the USA. Coming after USA Today and the Wall Street Journal.

I thought I pointed that out when I said - the NYT is one of the most widely read newspapers in the United States and exactly 134 people read it every day.

DDT
04-08-2008, 13:27
Actually, the number is 1,623,697 readers

MissAnnElk
04-08-2008, 14:39
I posted this link yesterday.

http://www.expat.ru/forum/current-affairs/95468-todays-new-york-times.html

Len Ganley Stance
04-08-2008, 15:08
I posted this link yesterday.

AnnElk,
I sincerely hope that you are not questioning Pechorin's claims of his brilliance and accusing him of plagiarism?

Flieger
04-08-2008, 15:16
The article seems to support the opposite of your premise (unless your entire post is tongue-in-cheek) citing scores of shuttle-trading Elektrichka riders hocking inferior, Chinese crap (in a word, 'khlam') desperate to make a quick buck because they reside in a country where nearly half the population, "struggles to make ends meet." When the new President's vow to combat poverty and corruption could be considered lip-service at best, what's to gloat about unless you happen to be one of the priveleged few able to register themselves in Moscow and capitalize on higher salaries still far too small to afford even the deposit on a Moscow-based apartment mortgage ? That the younger generation may not be nostalgic about times past doesn't preclude those times from providing most of the Soviet Union with an amply-sized social net consisting of free housing, education, medicine, and largely easily obtained employment.

That there were enormous problems with the earlier system is an understatement to say the least, but I find it difficult to definitively claim one was "better" than the other. I recall a common humorous sentiment in the years immediately following the Soviet Union's collapse: In the old days, everyone had money but the shelves were empty. Now the shelves are full but no one can afford to buy anything.

In short, I'd be far less quick to claim any advantage of one system over the other given the current state of affairs. I'd say each had it's pluses or minuses, and only time will ultimately tell what worked "better".

MissAnnElk
04-08-2008, 15:19
AnnElk,
I sincerely hope that you are not questioning Pechorin's claims of his brilliance and accusing him of plagiarism?

Not at all. Just his powers of observation . . . ;)

Pechorin
04-08-2008, 15:21
oh, I was at the dacha yesterday, and I do not read every single thread on this website.

but point noted.

Pechorin
04-08-2008, 15:27
oh only a fool would refuse to acknowledge that even the kind of capitalism Russia has is a vast improvement over the old Soviet system. and most of the problems with Russian capitalism are the consequence of 70 years of corrupt Soviet rule. Look at Slovenia, or even Poland, if you want to see how markets and free business liberate people and improve their lives.

Sh*t, even the Communists don't want to go back to the old system.

vox16
05-08-2008, 00:30
"The young are free of any nostalgia for the security of Soviet life — a feeling common even among older Russians who have prospered since its demise."

No. They remember that time only as a part of a childhood when that grass was th greenest and that happy times can never return.

pullar
05-08-2008, 16:00
Pechorin,

Your brilliance is matched only by your innate sense of modesty, which is at the same level as Lenin's. Happily there is no institution supporting you which will encourage all children to revere you as the best granddaddy of them all. By the by, do you really think that capitalist Victorian England was better than the Soviet Union for kids and the young? I'm thinking of pregnant women hauling coal underground, infants of five and six being employed ten hours a day in mines and factories, young men dying of scrotal cancer after working as chimney sweeps, girls in agony from phossy jaw ...

TGP
05-08-2008, 16:06
.... and I wonder, why Sal was banned? Was he much worse than this new genius?

Korotky Gennady
05-08-2008, 17:28
By the by, do you really think that capitalist Victorian England was better than the Soviet Union for kids and the young? I'm thinking of pregnant women hauling coal underground, infants of five and six being employed ten hours a day in mines and factories, young men dying of scrotal cancer after working as chimney sweeps, girls in agony from phossy jaw ...
Maybe Pechorin's ancestors were owners of these mines and chemical factories... you know.

Pechorin
05-08-2008, 17:52
well, let's see, in the Holodomor people resorted to eating their dead children. I'd say that tops any of the so-called horrors of Victorian England.

There is no single year in history where the average Soviet citizen, of any age, was better off than the average citizen of the UK. Not one.

Most Russians I know are pretty smart, how and why are you so relentlessly dumb?

pullar
05-08-2008, 19:10
well, let's see, in the Holodomor people resorted to eating their dead children. I'd say that tops any of the so-called horrors of Victorian England.

There is no single year in history where the average Soviet citizen, of any age, was better off than the average citizen of the UK. Not one.



Your use of the phrase 'so-called horrors of Victorian England' marks you out as quite remarkably dense and abominably ignorant of the economic and social history of the time. There is nothing 'so-called' about dying stuck up in a chimney from which no one can rescue you, nor yet dying from starvation in a hedgerow in Tolpuddle. Before condescending to irritate us with your far from scintillating intellect in future, I suggest you read a few pages from a relevant book or two.

ultimotattie
05-08-2008, 19:11
Pechorin:

We could ask you the same question.

Transparent Theatre
05-08-2008, 22:35
Maybe Pechorin's ancestors were owners of these mines and chemical factories... you know.

Doubtful, since Pechorin hails from the United States. Who else would use "brilliance" (a word rarely used in that context in American English) as a trolling wind-up to agitate the Brits he so pathologically dislikes?