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johnsemlak
31-07-2008, 14:58
Just trying to get the exact info on what a Newborn dual citizen Russian baby (US-Russian) needs to travel abroad.

I"ve already got my daughter the US passport, as well as the Russian birth certificate (obviously), which states that her father's American and her mother's Russian (though It does not say that the baby is a Russian citizen).

I had been expecting that to travel abroad, we would put the baby's name in the (Russian) mother's passport. But now we've been told the baby needs her own passport (which I prefer).

First, is it true that RUssian newborns need their own passports to travel abroad? Second, what exactly is required to get the baby's passport? So far we've been told we need a notarized letter from me stating I don't object to my daughter receiving a passport; and a stamp (apostile?) on her birth certificate stating that the baby is a Russian Citizen. Is that correct? Are there any other complications I need to worry about?

Mosray
31-07-2008, 23:43
Just trying to get the exact info on what a Newborn dual citizen Russian baby (US-Russian) needs to travel abroad.

I"ve already got my daughter the US passport, as well as the Russian birth certificate (obviously), which states that her father's American and her mother's Russian (though It does not say that the baby is a Russian citizen).

I had been expecting that to travel abroad, we would put the baby's name in the (Russian) mother's passport. But now we've been told the baby needs her own passport (which I prefer).

First, is it true that RUssian newborns need their own passports to travel abroad? Second, what exactly is required to get the baby's passport? So far we've been told we need a notarized letter from me stating I don't object to my daughter receiving a passport; and a stamp (apostile?) on her birth certificate stating that the baby is a Russian Citizen. Is that correct? Are there any other complications I need to worry about?

Maybe I can shed some light on your questions, having just gone through it myself in the last year.

As regards the Birth Cert you will need the legalisation stamp on it only if you wish your child to be a Russian Citizen (which is best as it will stop complications later).

My son has been nationalised (Russian Citizen) and now has dual Nationality as such. He has both a British Birth Cert and Russian, now has British Passport and soon Russian too.. Russia don't mind the child having dual nationality, they just won't recognise his british citizenship...lol

Now regarding the passport (international) You do not need to to have a passport for you baby, but again having one will make life a lot easier especially when travelling. If your baby is in the mothers passport then the child will only be able to travel when mum travels.

Documents need are numorous, and the type of photograph you require is important too..Just get you wife to go to your local passport stool and they will have all the information at hand.

The question regarding a notorised letter of permission to have an international passport I am not to sure about, as we are just in the process of making our sons Russian I.P, but my wife said as far as she knows you do not need this.. But I will confirm this within the coming week (if that helps)as we will have completed the application.

For what I understand a notorised letter is reqired when one of the parents is travelling with the child alone, the other has to give a notorised permission to travel.

I hope this helps in some small way.. If you have anymore question feel free to ask.. If I do not have the answer at hand I'll get it for you..:thumbsup:

Anastasia79
07-08-2008, 06:15
Hello,
I have just read your message and I am going to be in a similar situation pretty soon. I am from Russia and I am married to an American. We are expecting a baby and he is going to be born here in the States. Could you explain to me how you got a Russian Birth Certificate for your baby?

Penguin_The_Great
10-08-2008, 01:56
It is true that recently they’ve started this new policy that everybody needs a separate passport to travel abroad, even an infant. I understand that people still get away with having their children’s name in a parent’s passport, but it is not recommended.

If you child was born in Russia, you will need her birth certificate that has been stamped with a “Russian citizen” stamp, I believe. You can get it stamped at you local “passportniy stol”. And yes, you will need your notarized agreement.

Anastasia, you are in a different situation. You will have to file for you child’s citizenship through you local Russian consulate/embassy. It’s actually pretty simple, and took me about 10 days. Go to the Russian Embassy in Washington website, they have pretty clear instructions posted. You can also call them. The girl that I talked to there was extremely helpful and nice.

salmoxis
04-09-2008, 09:50
Hi, I can just add a little bit to the previous posts that might help furhter clarify...When our first daughter was born, we first had to go to a notary and get a signed affadavit from me (the foreign parent) that said I did not disagree with the baby becoming a Russian citizen, and then the 'pasportny stol' people stamped the back of her certificate and wrote her name in her mom's passport.

We traveled to America and it was no problem that she didn't have a separate passport (this was Dec 2007), she left Russia as a Russian and entered America with her US passport, and vice versa on the way back. But nine months ago, in terms of how quickly russian law changes, is a very long time...

Pocket
20-09-2008, 23:52
Anastasia79 --
We are the same as you -- American father, Russian (also American citizen) wife. We wanted our son to get his Russian citizenship and it was surprisingly easy. We were quite pleased with the Russian consulate in Houston -- they were fast, efficient and friendly. When I thanked them for their good work, they provided an idea as to why things went so smoothly -- "Your paperwork was perfect. Normally we get forms filled out wrong, bad transalations, and photocopies that can't be read."
Here is how it works:
1. Get the proper forms from the consulate and complete them.
2. You will need a certified birth certificate for your child. It will need a notarized translation into Russian. Then, you will have to send that to the Secretary of State in the state you live in for an apostile.
3. Your Russian passport must be current (That is the proof that you are a citizen of Russia.) My wife's international Russian passport had expired, so she had to get it renewed through the consulate; they will not accept the internal passport as proof of citizenship.
4. Standard passport photo.
5. Notarized, with apostile, letter in Russian (or with official, notarized transalation if in English) from me stating that is was okay for my son to become a Russian citizen.
After submitting all of the above, we received our son's Russian passport in a couple weeks.
The consulate made special comment about how wonderful our translation work was (The paperwork was a thing of beauty.) I don't want to post an advertisement, but if you pm me, I can provide the address of our translator if you want it.
It was great going to Russia this past summer with our 2-year-old -- out on the Russian passports, in on the U.S. passports.

J.D.
21-09-2008, 05:46
As you can see from this thread Russian rules are certainly not consistent over time and often not consistent from agency to agency, or even clerk to clerk. That's why my son always travels on his American passport and is here on a Russian visa even though he has Russian citizenship.

vladimir_seroff
21-09-2008, 07:28
As you can see from this thread Russian rules are certainly not consistent over time and often not consistent from agency to agency, or even clerk to clerk. That's why my son always travels on his American passport and is here on a Russian visa even though he has Russian citizenship.

And where is it different?

Time dimension:

According to the US rules it was OK to sell short only a week ago, now it is not. :-)
Until not so long ago it was not necessary to leave one's fingerprints at the border crossing, when entering the US territory, now it is required.

Virtual bureaucratic space dimension:

In order to be considered a US resident by the IRS, one has to stay in the US more than 183 days, but the Department Of Homeland Security will not consider one a resident unless one has a green card.

Human factor dimension:

At the country clerk's office in Manhattan, the other day, a lady refused a friend of mine to give him a certification of a notary who notarized his signature under the the copy of a New Jersey Certificate of Incorporation having explained it by saying that a copy of a document issued by the State Department of the State of New Jersey should have been issued by the same agency. The next day his secretary went to the same office and got a certification.

Entering the Russian Federation with a foreign passport with a Russian visa, while being a Russian citizen is a violation of the law. Stop doing that, life of crime doesn't pay. :-)

J.D.
21-09-2008, 08:03
I'd rather my son be deported for a visa violation than detained as a Russian subject.

vladimir_seroff
21-09-2008, 09:43
I'd rather my son be deported for a visa violation than detained as a Russian subject.

Entering Russia with a Russian Visa in the US passport may be a way to conceal his Russian citizenship, but legally it doesn't change the fact that he is a Russian citizen. The Russian authorities would still treat him, as a Russian citizen, if they find out that he is, regardless how he entered Russia.