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SalTheReturn
31-07-2008, 14:26
I have just re-started studying english and hired myself a damn cheap non qualified teacher.

I hope you do not mind if I here post from time to time some questions.

Here are the first two:

1)difference between "among" and "amongst"
2)difference between "from time to time" and "now and then"

Cheers

Your

Sal

Bels
31-07-2008, 14:40
It'll cost you 1,000 roubles. But first of all get out of the teacher's discussion folder and post it somewhere else.

Unless you were invited of course.

Bels
31-07-2008, 14:45
And you wouldn't happen to be on LSD at the moment, would you Sal?

SalTheReturn
31-07-2008, 15:10
Bels, where should I post this? Anyway write your reply, I am your student:10806:

elis
31-07-2008, 15:18
I hope you do not mind if I here post from time to time some questions.

Here are the first two:

1)difference between "among" and "amongst"
2)difference between "from time to time" and "now and then"



No difference. Although, in the US at least, amongst is rarely used. Also, "now and then" is usually "every now and then." I find that "every now and then" is more commonly used than "from time to time."

Also, rephrasing suggestion: I hope you do not mind if, from time to time, I post some questions here.

kirk10071
31-07-2008, 15:20
I have just re-started studying english and hired myself a damn cheap non qualified teacher.

I hope you do not mind if I here post from time to time some questions.

Here are the first two:

1)difference between "among" and "amongst"
2)difference between "from time to time" and "now and then"

Cheers

Your

Sal

My unqualified answer: Amongst is more British. I never use it. I always say "among."

There is not difference between "from time to time" and "now and then." I cannot think of any case where one would be appropriate and the other would not. Maybe someone else will be able to find a distinction.

SalTheReturn
31-07-2008, 16:02
thanks guys, despite Bels' rant I will keep this thread going

SalTheReturn
31-07-2008, 16:03
Elis, I like placing the adver after the verb. As same as in italian it kind of "strenghten" the phrase.

elis
31-07-2008, 16:11
Elis, I like placing the adver after the verb. As same as in italian it kind of "strenghten" the phrase.

I don't necessarily disagree. I've been known to say "that's why they call it an ad-verb." In this case, however, I don't think that "from time to time" qualifies as such. And, actually, it was more the position of your "here" that made the sentence awkward.

chertovka
31-07-2008, 16:30
Now the 'damn cheap non qualified teacher' will know his place! :11513:

Bels
31-07-2008, 16:59
I'm glad to see you're amongst friends Sal.

SalTheReturn
31-07-2008, 17:21
I don't necessarily disagree. I've been known to say "that's why they call it an ad-verb." In this case, however, I don't think that "from time to time" qualifies as such. And, actually, it was more the position of your "here" that made the sentence awkward.

my mistake. I meant the adver placed before the verb is more powerful.

I in front of everyone confess that...

I confess in front of everyone that...

I like more the first option, it is more pompous.

What was so awkward in my sentence?

SalTheReturn
31-07-2008, 17:22
I'm glad to see you're amongst friends Sal.

"amongst" sounds much more chic

Gypsy
31-07-2008, 19:32
I have just re-started studying english and hired myself a damn cheap non qualified teacher.

I hope you do not mind if I here post from time to time some questions.

Here are the first two:

1)difference between "among" and "amongst"
2)difference between "from time to time" and "now and then"

Cheers

Your

Sal

I would use "amongst" if I was part of the group concerned, there seems something more personal about it; eg. amongst our group John was the best tennis player. Otherwise, among. eg he was first among equals.

Other one - I cannot see any difference.

And Sal - this seems as good a place to post english questions as any, so keep posting.

elis
31-07-2008, 19:43
I like more the first option, it is more pompous.

What was so awkward in my sentence?


"amongst" sounds much more chic


I think it's better to sound chic than pompous.

About the sentence, it was just worded in a fashion that no English speaker would use, although we all understood perfectly well. Was just putting in my 2 cents. See, I'm pretty damn cheap, too. :)