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Matt Bury
09-06-2004, 03:38
Yeah maan, I just gotta learn some Russian. I love the way it sounds. I love pronouncing the 7 words and 2 sentences I know. (Excuse the spelling - I've never seen them written down and I haven't learned the Russian alphabet yet!)

Ya hachu snetz ruski.
Ya lublu t'ibya.
priviat/salut,
voda,
nasdrovia,
spassiba,
dosvidanya/paka

I need more!! I gotta have more!! How did you non-Russians start learning? Can you recommend any good courses, books, software, etc.?

Spassiba in advance!

natalia_apple
09-06-2004, 04:19
Originally posted by Matt Bury
Yeah maan, I just gotta learn some Russian. I love the way it sounds. I love pronouncing the 7 words and 2 sentences I know. (Excuse the spelling - I've never seen them written down and I haven't learned the Russian alphabet yet!)

Ya hachu snetz ruski.
Ya lublu t'ibya.
priviat/salut,
voda,
nasdrovia,
spassiba,
dosvidanya/paka

I need more!! I gotta have more!! How did you non-Russians start learning? Can you recommend any good courses, books, software, etc.?
Spassiba in advance!

Oh, Mat, its so sweet...
but its not "snetz", its "znat' ", with the sound like "ah", and why does everybody think that we Russians say "nasdrovia" when we raise our glasses? I dont, I say "vashe zdarovye", or "tvayo zdarovye", with a stress on "-ro-" syllable, which means something like "(I drink) to your health!"
we say "nasdrovia" in the meaning of "You're welcome", when somebody says thanks to us for treating them to some food

I'm not a professional Russian teacher, but I think you maybe at first could have some fun just learning some more simple everyday phrases..

bkc has a school "Globus" in its system, where you can have Russian lessons!!!

and at Dave's ESL Cafe, I think they had some links to online resourses for learning Russian

Good luck!

Innosranets
09-06-2004, 09:51
Try the more colloquial form of "good-bye". It's kinda like "catch you later"

"Otsosi menya"

Make sure you say it with a big smile !

kniga
09-06-2004, 10:09
Innosranets,

Your nickname is misspelled, but your tag line is certainly accurate. Why mislead someone who is genuinely enthusiastic about learning Russian, and especially why put such a filthy phrase in his mouth that he may innocently repeat? You're doing a great job of perpetuating the idea of the Ugly American abroad.

VikaV
09-06-2004, 10:11
Innozasranets,
It " otsosi u menia".
Dva balla tebe.

Innosranets
09-06-2004, 10:22
Originally posted by kniga
Innosranets,

Your nickname is misspelled, but your tag line is certainly accurate. Why mislead someone who is genuinely enthusiastic about learning Russian, and especially why put such a filthy phrase in his mouth that he may innocently repeat? You're doing a great job of perpetuating the idea of the Ugly American abroad.

Geesh, Knig, just trying to have a little laugh. I wasn't really gonna let it ride. I didn't have my caffeine dosage this morning (and neither have you, it seems), and was hence feeling a tad more bitter and sarcastic than I should have. But who among us, at one time or another, hasn't had a similar joke played on them ? It's kinda an initiation.

And, my nick is NOT misspelled, it's an intentional and sarcastic play on words. Think about it.

Matt, DON'T use the above phrase (especially if it's grammatically incorrect). It's a rather rude phrase meaning, roughly, "suck me". I'll think of a better way to trip you up later. :)

Kshisya
09-06-2004, 10:36
Originally posted by VikaV
Innozasranets,
It " otsosi u menia".
Dva balla tebe.

dva bala too :p


it should be said as just "OTSOSI" :p

:rolleyes:

Matt Bury ;)

skolko vremya? - what time is it?
khochu vodka (morozhenoe, pit, est etc) - I wanna some vodka(ice-cream, drink, eat)
sam durak - see you later! ;)

:p

kniga
09-06-2004, 10:57
Innosranets,

I understood your intent, I just thought it was inappropriate for the Expat Cafe. However, I give you credit for your recovery. Peace.

Matt Bury
09-06-2004, 21:45
Originally posted by Innosranets
Geesh, Knig, just trying to have a little laugh. I wasn't really gonna let it ride. I didn't have my caffeine dosage this morning (and neither have you, it seems), and was hence feeling a tad more bitter and sarcastic than I should have. But who among us, at one time or another, hasn't had a similar joke played on them ? It's kinda an initiation.

And, my nick is NOT misspelled, it's an intentional and sarcastic play on words. Think about it.

Matt, DON'T use the above phrase (especially if it's grammatically incorrect). It's a rather rude phrase meaning, roughly, "suck me". I'll think of a better way to trip you up later. :)

Don't worry, you'll have to try pretty hard to trip me up. This ain't the first time I've learned a foreign language mate.

I have to admit, I did something similar to my ex when I first met her:

We got into a bizzare conversation about cheese. She's German and she likes strong flavoured cheese (I'm not trying to relate Germans and cheese here people!) and she was rather disappointed that she couldn't find any good, strong English cheeses.

I'm sure you can guess what's coming next...

Well, I told her that there are some English cheeses that are very strong but they're not that popular and you have to go to a delicatessen counter or a specialist shop and ask for them. I recommended a particularly good one which is called "smegma."

Thankfully, the next time I saw her she hadn't been cheese shopping and I told her. We became good friends and eventually ended up going out for 4 and half years.

P.S. Innosranets that ain't a come-on so get yer trousers back on!

Zephyr
10-06-2004, 00:29
Originally posted by VikaV
Innozasranets,
It " otsosi u menia".
Dva balla tebe.
As with Zasranets I think that the context is more important than the word themselves, For example I would use this word for a messy baby or for my parrot without anyone raising an eyebrow, but certainly not in public without a proper context.
There are however Russian words I would never use outside of a private muttering on striking my thumb with a hammer or some such thing. These words will have to be taught so that you'll know not to use them. I agree with Kniga that you must be careful on what you repeat.

natalia_apple
10-06-2004, 00:55
Originally posted by Kshisya
dva bala too :p


sam durak - see you later! ;)

:p

no, you say this when you're returning someone a compliment...:D

Miss B
10-06-2004, 01:45
It seems to me that it's much easier to use the foul language of a not native language. Perhaps its harshness is not realized completely and sometimes you don't even think about the structural units it consists of which have their own meanings.
I never swear in Russian. But it goes quite well in English... even interesting to learn new expressions... thanks to you guys now I know a good deal of them! ;)

Zephyr
10-06-2004, 01:53
I'm not a native Russian speaker but I feel that some of the worst Russian "bad" words are much more serious than most American bad words, especially ones that cast dispersion with the root for mama.
I would like Russian input on that , Thanks

natalia_apple
10-06-2004, 02:05
Originally posted by Zephyr
I feel that some of the worst Russian "bad" words are much more serious than most American bad words

I'm a native Russian speaker and I have the same feeling

Filimon
10-06-2004, 02:17
Totally agree. Some of them I cannot say when a lady is present even when she does not speak a word of Russian

Zephyr
10-06-2004, 02:20
Actually the way I learned most of these words was when my wife and I passed a group of "youts"I could always tell they were being used because she would have her ears covered:-)
However I still had to ask someone else to find out what they meant because she wouldn't even say them.

Zephyr
10-06-2004, 02:31
Also from my own experiance it would be indispensable to learn the culture behind the usage and meaning of the language. Without this context I don't think a true understanding can be reached. Take it from me this is a lifetime process, but a more rewarding one I have yet to find.

Matt Bury
10-06-2004, 03:50
Ok, enough with the finer points people!!

How abot getting started with stuff like pronunciation, vocabulary, structures and contexts?

I need some audio input and pictures and kid's stuff, you know, so it's fun to learn.

I used a computer program called "Tell Me More" to start learning Spanish. It's got loads and loads of pronunciation exercises and speech analysis and now I can pronounce Spanish so that most Spanish people have trouble telling where I'm from - They know I'm not Spanish but I haven't got a recogniseable accent.

It was also brilliant for learning whole, natural phrases and using the language the same way that Spanish people do i.e. not just a text-book translation that you might find in a university or language coursebook.

Does anyone know of anything like that in Russian.

natalia_apple
10-06-2004, 04:02
maybe you should also post it in the lessons sections, to have more chance to attract the attention of pofessional Russian teachers?
And also post your question on professional teachers' sites, EFL teachers who have been in the same situation will probably be more able to help...

Matt Bury
10-06-2004, 04:10
Thanks Nat, good idea!