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Gypsy
20-06-2008, 16:39
"A woman without her man is nothing"

This phrase can be punctuated in two ways to come up with opposing meanings.

Can you do it?

(No teachers as I'm sure you have this in your text books.)

J.D.
20-06-2008, 20:04
A woman without her man, is nothing.

A woman, without her, man is nothing but happy.

MickeyTong
20-06-2008, 20:53
Here's another:

"Dear John:
I want a man who knows what love is all about. You are generous, kind, thoughtful. People who are not like you admit to being useless and inferior. You have ruined me for other men. I yearn for you. I have no feelings whatsoever when we're apart. I can be forever happy -- will you let me be yours?
Gloria"

or -

"Dear John:
I want a man who knows what love is. All about you are generous, kind, thoughtful people, who are not like you. Admit to being useless and inferior. You have ruined me. For other men, I yearn. For you, I have no feelings whatsoever. When we're apart, I can be forever happy. Will you let me be?
Yours, Gloria"

Miracle77777
22-06-2008, 00:22
A woman without her man, is nothing.

A woman, without her, man is nothing but happy.

Nice.....
But I have an answer to you, dear:)

-Is it true, that God created a Man before Woman???
-Absolutely true, son.......
But here: you also make a draft before chef-d'oeuvre.....;)

bambina
22-06-2008, 00:42
"A woman without her man is nothing"

This phrase can be punctuated in two ways to come up with opposing meanings.

Can you do it?

(No teachers as I'm sure you have this in your text books.)

a woman, without her man is nothing.
a woman without her man, is nothing.

Gypsy
22-06-2008, 09:04
A woman without her man is nothing. ie the woman is nothing unless she has a man.

A woman: without her, man is nothing. ie The man is nothing unless he has a woman.

monica
22-06-2008, 13:05
A woman: without her, man is nothing. ie The man is nothing unless he has a woman.


A wise woman: without her, man is nothing.

Gypsy
22-06-2008, 13:48
A wise woman: without her, man is nothing.

You won't see me arguing.

elis
22-06-2008, 14:22
Just got this via email:

By Paul Collins
Posted Friday, June 20, 2008, at 4:51 PM ET

When the Times of London reported in 1837 on two University of Paris law profs dueling with swords, the dispute wasn't over the fine points of the Napoleonic Code. It was over the point-virgule: the semicolon. "The one who contended that the passage in question ought to be concluded by a semicolon was wounded in the arm," noted the Times. "His adversary maintained that it should be a colon."

French passions over the semicolon are running high once again. An April Fool's hoax this year by the online publication Rue89 claimed that the Nicolas Sarkozy government planned to demand "at least three semicolons per page in official administrative documents." Parliamentarian Benoist Apparu was in on the joke—"The disappearance of the semicolon in Eastern France is absolutely dramatic," he gamely proclaimed—and linguist Alain Rey (barely) kept a straight face for a video calling Frenchmen to arms. Reporters were taken in, since, like every great hoax, it was plausible enough to be true. Le Figaro has proclaimed, "The much-loved semicolon is in the process of disappearance; let us protect it," and there was even a brief attempt at a Committee for the Defense of the Semicolon—a modern update on the Anti-Comma League that France had back in 1934. French commentators blame the semicolon's decline on everything from "the modern need for speed" to the corrupting influence of English and its short, declarative sentences. It's a charge leveled for years stateside, too, with Sven Birkerts bemoaning the Internet's baleful influence on semicolons a decade ago.

MissAnnElk
22-06-2008, 16:49
I'm a whiz with the semi-colon.

Gypsy
22-06-2008, 16:58
I have to confess that I did fall for this one. It just felt right.


Just got this via email:

By Paul Collins
Posted Friday, June 20, 2008, at 4:51 PM ET

When the Times of London reported in 1837 on two University of Paris law profs dueling with swords, the dispute wasn't over the fine points of the Napoleonic Code. It was over the point-virgule: the semicolon. "The one who contended that the passage in question ought to be concluded by a semicolon was wounded in the arm," noted the Times. "His adversary maintained that it should be a colon."

French passions over the semicolon are running high once again. An April Fool's hoax this year by the online publication Rue89 claimed that the Nicolas Sarkozy government planned to demand "at least three semicolons per page in official administrative documents." Parliamentarian Benoist Apparu was in on the joke—"The disappearance of the semicolon in Eastern France is absolutely dramatic," he gamely proclaimed—and linguist Alain Rey (barely) kept a straight face for a video calling Frenchmen to arms. Reporters were taken in, since, like every great hoax, it was plausible enough to be true. Le Figaro has proclaimed, "The much-loved semicolon is in the process of disappearance; let us protect it," and there was even a brief attempt at a Committee for the Defense of the Semicolon—a modern update on the Anti-Comma League that France had back in 1934. French commentators blame the semicolon's decline on everything from "the modern need for speed" to the corrupting influence of English and its short, declarative sentences. It's a charge leveled for years stateside, too, with Sven Birkerts bemoaning the Internet's baleful influence on semicolons a decade ago.

MickeyTong
22-06-2008, 18:14
"Here is a lesson in creative writing. First rule: Do not use semicolons. They are transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing. All they do is show you've been to college." Kurt Vonnegut.

Gypsy
22-06-2008, 19:24
I seem to recall the semi-colon being used to link two separate phrases, or to indicate a contradiction; and a colon for lists etc.

Maybe Malypense will be able to explain it when next online.

MissAnnElk
22-06-2008, 20:05
This is helpful: 410 Grammar: Using Colons and Semi-Colons (http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/StudyZone/410/grammar/colons.htm)

A semi-colon is stronger than a comma, and not as strong as a period. It can join two phrases that could stand alone as grammatically correct sentences. It can also be used to separate items in a series (a, b, and c) when the list items have commas within them.

A colon is used to introduce an idea. What follows does not necessarily need to stand alone as a sentence, although it could. The colon does function as an equals sign (=) in a way. The items on either side of the colon are equal in some way.

Sometimes it is a question of style as to whether to use a colon or a semi-colon when what appears on either side could be a free-standing, grammatically-correct sentence.

Gypsy
22-06-2008, 20:08
This is helpful: 410 Grammar: Using Colons and Semi-Colons (http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/StudyZone/410/grammar/colons.htm)

A semi-colon is stronger than a comma, and not as strong as a period. It can join two phrases that could stand alone as grammatically correct sentences. It can also be used to separate items in a series (a, b, and c) when the list items have commas within them.

A colon is used to introduce an idea. What follows does not necessarily need to stand alone as a sentence, although it could. The colon does function as an equals sign (=) in a way. The items on either side of the colon are equal in some way.

Sometimes it is a question of style as to whether to use a colon or a semi-colon when what appears on either side could be a free-standing, grammatically-correct sentence.
So that's clear then.

MissAnnElk
22-06-2008, 20:12
So that's clear then.

Better than anything I can say is Strunk & White's Elements of Style. It's short, it's clear, and it's right.

Gypsy
22-06-2008, 20:14
Better than anything I can say is Strunk & White's Elements of Style. It's short, it's clear, and it's right.

Sounds just like me.

MissAnnElk
22-06-2008, 20:15
Sounds just like me.

But you're taller.

Gypsy
22-06-2008, 20:28
But you're taller.

Doubtful - I think I am same height as Robert Redford. In fact we are often mistaken for each other, it's a real pain. He often calls complaining about having to explain to people that he's not me.

I've got his autograph down preety good - if I could only find his cheque book.

hazelnut
24-06-2008, 14:03
A woman, without her, man is nothing but happy.

so, you think he'd be happier if i left him? :)

Gypsy
24-06-2008, 14:07
so, you think he'd be happier if i left him? :)

That would appear to be what he is saying.