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xt-tsi
13-05-2004, 22:25
Still picking out schools for our 6 and 9 year old daughters.

Has anybody out there gone to the British International School and can they send their comments? Happy? Not Happy?

I know about the cost...

Cheers!

X

Khal
27-05-2004, 15:42
Xt-sti

Am planning on moving to Moscow from Dublin and discovered this forum just today. Saw your question on British International School and wondered whether you had found anything out since it was posted. Am in same position. Have 12 year-old daughter and am starting to panic about the school search as I don't know any parents in Moscow who can give me the 'real' story....

cshah50
28-05-2004, 09:39
I m also moving to moscow in a months time. have checked with BIS.. They are bit exp... but schooling looks good.

I hv their rates etc .. if any one interested pls. mail me... at cshah50@rediffmail.con

Khal
28-05-2004, 12:32
Thanks, will mail you re fees as only have last year's.
Have you heard whether there's a difference in quality between the northern and southern BIS secondary schools? The one in the south looks to be much better equipped according to the website.

cshah50
28-05-2004, 13:21
khal

no i have no idea on that.. as it is toooo exp. for me to put my kid in the school.

rgds

jenny
02-06-2004, 17:56
We've been disappointed with the British school, very poorly equipped. No lunchroom, no gym, no science lab. The children are poorly supervised academically and in general. I heard that the British Schools in the south are better. The average annual fee now is around 19,000 USD. Good luck.

Khal
02-06-2004, 18:31
Thanks Jenny. It kind of looked that way from the website and faxed info I've received. Will have to look into possibilty of getting down south when working in north....
Am starting to have doubts about whole thing now, will maybe try and look into Russian schools with a partial English language programme as long as it's accredited and with native speaking English teachers. Has anyone heard of such a thing? Grateful for any advice! I read about the school booklet on the forum search and have asked a friend to pick one up for me.

Incredibly frustrating trying to find a good school in Moscow while at work in Dublin!

rosieredwood
02-06-2004, 18:59
Originally posted by jenny
We've been disappointed with the British school, very poorly equipped. No lunchroom, no gym, no science lab. The children are poorly supervised academically and in general. I heard that the British Schools in the south are better. The average annual fee now is around 19,000 USD. Good luck.

Given what you've just written, how does BIS justify charging such an exorbitant tuition fee?

M-C
02-06-2004, 20:27
I visited the BI school in the south a few years back and found it well equipped (great children's books and a lot of them!), the teachers seemed happy and dedicated. It was obvious that they were working hard. The way I understood the situation was that their main challenge resided in the lack of native speakers among the children, with the obvious consequences. The high fee at the time was justified by the fact that they had native speakers (as teachers, at least), the premises (pretty big by private school standards here), the fact that they were way cheaper than the anglo-american school and, last but not least, that this way they were able to regulate the number of Russians at the school (wanting their kids to learn English). This has been confirmed by several people who had their children at BI school.

rosieredwood
03-06-2004, 10:21
Well, it would seem that the times certainly have changed. As far as I can ascertain, BIS and AAS would now be very similar in tuition fees.

I believe in the Platonic view of educating the whole person, body and mind. The AAS would seem to have this down pat, what with the campus and facilities available to both the student body and the faculty, as well.

Other threads that have been started at this site, regarding English-language education, have brought to light the rigorous education in mathematics and the physical sciences that are present in Russian schools, yet a bit lacking in the aforementioned English-language schools. By overburdening pupils with such a heavy load and not allowing them to develop socially and physically, as well, it would seem that the Russian schools serve a parochial, counterproductive purpose. If an individual set of parents wishes for little Vova or Sasha to have extra drilling in maths/biology, they could arrange for this in much the same way that pupils studying music and taking up instruments attend individual, post school-hours lessons with the appropriate tutors.

Yes, there should be sensible discipline and respect for one another within the schooling system, yet, Russian schools seem to stress academic rigour and not provide an atmosphere of respect for fellow pupils outside of the classroom.

M-C
03-06-2004, 10:42
You bet!!! I agree 100% with you, the programmes in Russia, especially, but not only, as far as science is concerned, are ovewhelming for most kids. The pressure, really extreme in Moscow to enter institutes or go to university after school means that parents start worrying in kindergarten, mass hysteria begins at the latest at the end of primary school. The concern appears to be, even among parents who choose to send their children to an alternative school, based on subject knowledge. Passing exams is a difficulty which is circumscribed by either learning all the possible exam papers by heart (no, no, don't worry, they haven't changed for a decade or so) or simply by cheating and this with not only the teacher's blessing but help!
To my way of thinking that isn't even the worst in the system, kids really can learn more than school programmes offer, but the belief system behind this, i.e reproductive learning, the result justifies the means and above all, don't even try to think or do anything on your own....
The interesting thing is that if you do things diferently, while preserving the contents of the official programme and basically make kids happy to learn and come to school, parents get suspicious..... a school system really is a reflection of society, or a sort of portrait of Dorian Grey of academic success.
Still, I shall go on, I'm not giving up!!! And who knows, I might even overcome a hurdle or two!

rosieredwood
03-06-2004, 11:02
In addition, with the reforms in the exam system, transferring over to a country-wide, standardised, comprehensive exam for those finishing school, it is easy to understand why there is such aversion, particularly amongst the teachers - they're going to lose their meal ticket that comes in the form of being "repetitory" (i.e., taking extra dosh for "preparing" pupils for university entrance exams). This is the single worst abuse in the system. And using crib notes is simply an institution here. Some experts have noted that academic cheating is simply a form of bordom and complete disinterest in the subject matter - not necessarily the subject itself, just the material and how it's presented. I've heard tales from Russian friends about taking exams and during the silence, hearing a book drop on the floor...this is simply great!

M-C
03-06-2004, 11:19
You can get better than books dropping on the floor nowadays! You can actually be asked by the teacher to go and wash your hands and leave your paper on her desk, so that she can take care of a couple of pesky mistakes which would otherwise prevent her from giving a pass.... Schools need to have a maximum of good exam results to get access to subsidies, so, they do what's necessary in their eyes

rosieredwood
03-06-2004, 11:27
Oh, yeah, I neglected to mention modern tech. in use today, with the mobiles, Palm PCs, etc.

M-C
03-06-2004, 12:47
This, for our more privileged young friends:
I neglected to mention modern tech. in use today, with the mobiles, Palm PCs, etc who will get a good deal whatever way!

rosieredwood
03-06-2004, 13:23
I don't know the situation everywhere, but when I was in college in Massachusetts (colleges are just smaller versions of universities in the US, with a better student/teacher ratio, on average 15/1), by registering for each semester, students implicitly argeed to the college's academic honesty code (no cribs, no plagiarism, no presenting another's work as though it were yours etc..); also, no electric/tech. devices of any kind, unless otherwise specified by the professor (e.g., calculators for calculus, physics) during exams. This remains the policy today.

M-C
03-06-2004, 13:51
honesty code (no cribs, no plagiarism, no presenting another's work as though it were yours etc
Hmmmmmm, this would be found hilarious in schools here,!However, as far as I know from friends and colleagues, the MGU is still reputable and even though young people may resort to "extra tuition" (at 40-60 $ an academic hour...) to get in, the subsequent exams are "clean", although, generally speaking, those who enter university, get through, unlike their European/American counterparts who seem to fail exams at a higher rate.

rosieredwood
03-06-2004, 14:03
Actually, most of the upper echelon US universities/colleges have a relatively high first-year-to-graduation rate (~80%), because the students are of higher quality education/intelligence-wise. The ~20% also includes those who trasfer to other colleges due to factors such as high tuition/family/poor marks. Some of the lower end State U schools have atrocious drop-out/failure rates. And money/legacy status also play a role in Western admission/retention/matriculation rates, but not to some of the flagrant degrees that occur here.

M-C
03-06-2004, 14:20
most of the upper echelon US universities/colleges have a relatively high first-year-to-graduation rate (~80%),
That's really high, by european standards, it's a good sign, maybe the fact that students actually pay for their tuition is a factor too.
students are of higher quality education/intelligence-wise
This is something that is probably true, it always surprises me how such id.., well, cognitvely less favoured people actually have higher education here. It's really a huge problem too as they are usually in administrative positions, sort of in the middle of things, busy making others' lives complicated because of their blatant incompetence