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MissAnnElk
07-05-2008, 10:53
I know it's hard to choose.

Here are a few I like, just to get things started. You may notice dogs are a big theme for me.

Gypsy
07-05-2008, 11:11
I quite like the Manet,personal favourites are Corot and Pizzarro

MissAnnElk
07-05-2008, 11:15
I was so disappointed with the lighting of that Manet at the Musee d'Orsay . . . glare!

Goya has that pair of the clothed and unclothed Maja that I like too.

And I saw some Klimts in Vienna that blew me away . . . as one friend told me, seeing a painting in a photo is like kissing over the telephone. Just not the same at all.

Next time you go to the Louvre, skip the Mona Lisa and go see the Vermeers. NO ONE is there usually, and they are like jewels!

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 11:15
There are numerous, naturally, for example:

13653

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 11:19
13655

MissAnnElk
07-05-2008, 11:20
Ohh, I love those.

And how could I forget Frida?

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 11:22
13659

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 11:24
13660

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 11:28
13663

Gypsy
07-05-2008, 11:52
13664

13665

I love House of the Hanged man by Cezanne.

Orion
07-05-2008, 12:01
Frida's uni-brow always disturbed me. (Even when it was on Selma Hayek!)

elis
07-05-2008, 12:09
Frida's uni-brow always disturbed me. (Even when it was on Selma Hayek!)

Couldn't agree more. Always makes me want to pluck my eyebrows.

elis
07-05-2008, 12:20
I just recently discovered Konstantin Gorbatov! Wonderful, wonderful stuff.

Still, my favorite is dear old Vincent.

AndreyS
07-05-2008, 12:23
13664

13665

I love House of the Hanged man by Cezanne.

Nice painting, but name's quite depressing.

jumatre
07-05-2008, 15:15
Whatabout Hieronymus Bosch - Garden of Delights?

Korotky Gennady
07-05-2008, 15:53
Frida's uni-brow always disturbed me. (Even when it was on Selma Hayek!)In which way ? :eh:

Korotky Gennady
07-05-2008, 15:55
Briolette, I feel your taste. We both have the same one. :eh:



:beerbros:

elis
07-05-2008, 17:10
Whatabout Hieronymus Bosch - Garden of Delights?

That's like one of the scariest things ever! Gave me nightmares. Fabulous in its own right--without a doubt--but I'd be hard pressed to call it a favorite.

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 17:22
13669

13670

13671

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 17:24
13672

13673

13674

13675

Briolette.
07-05-2008, 17:25
13676

bambina
07-05-2008, 17:34
here some of my favorite

kirk10071
07-05-2008, 17:35
My contribution...

Orion
07-05-2008, 17:55
Perfect social commentary.

Notice how it is the two lighter dogs dogs cheating to take advantage of the rest. They no doubt have sold the whisky to red coloured dogs inorder to facilitate that. And iIdon't think I need to point out that the the black dog on the right has a collar around his neck that doesn't look like the collars of the other dogs. His looks more like a chain. And the pipe that he is smoking...well, both of those combine to symbolize the slavery and forced labour on plantation that he has been subject to for centuries.

kirk10071
07-05-2008, 18:01
Perfect social commentary.

Notice how it is the two lighter dogs dogs cheating to take advantage of the rest. They no doubt have sold the whisky to red coloured dogs inorder to facilitate that. And iIdon't think I need to point out that the the black dog on the right has a collar around his neck that doesn't look like the collars of the other dogs. His looks more like a chain. And the pipe that he is smoking...well, both of those combine to symbolize the slavery and forced labour on plantation that he has been subject to for centuries.

You forgot to mention that the one with the ace in his foot looks like a joo.

elis
07-05-2008, 18:07
Perfect social commentary.

Notice how it is the two lighter dogs dogs cheating to take advantage of the rest. They no doubt have sold the whisky to red coloured dogs inorder to facilitate that. And iIdon't think I need to point out that the the black dog on the right has a collar around his neck that doesn't look like the collars of the other dogs. His looks more like a chain. And the pipe that he is smoking...well, both of those combine to symbolize the slavery and forced labour on plantation that he has been subject to for centuries.

OMG. I had no idea. I'd always thought it was just about small dogs being conniving little ankle biters who can't be trusted, and that big dogs are the mellow cool ones you'd always want to hang with.

elis
07-05-2008, 18:08
Kirk, you paraxite! Is that really your fave?

kirk10071
07-05-2008, 18:17
Kirk, you paraxite! Is that really your fave?

As a confirmed paraxite, it's part of my practice just to get on other people's threads and make light. I am planning to start many of my own threads, but I will limit them to two categories:

(1) inflammatory topics (topics to come: which terrorist act most impressed you and which minority do you hate most), and

(2) topics exclusively about me and my own life (topics to come: I am smarter than you so don't spout crap; my mama needs a new boyfriend; is it OK that I cannot commit?; I had a rectal exam; I think I choke my chicken too often; does anyone have any advice for me? do you think I treated my date badly? among others oriented toward myself).

Although I have in the past only been a paraxite, I am inspired to open new threads, limited to the two categories above, "to keep the forum lively." Although I might open threads about YOU, the other forum members, it will be limited to what I think of you.

Let me know if any of them have been done before so that I don't get repetitive.

Oh, and Elis, you are a racist. LOL LOL LOL. Now, back to the paintings and quit hijacking. I'm off.

kirk10071
07-05-2008, 18:24
Kirk, you paraxite! Is that really your fave?

Actually, one of my favorites is Gabrielle d'Estrées and One of her Sisters in the Bath. I read a whole book about that painting and the story was fiction, but quite engaging. The painting is a real mystery.

MissAnnElk
07-05-2008, 18:50
Whatabout Hieronymus Bosch - Garden of Delights?


I saw it at the Prado. It's wonderful in person.

MissAnnElk
07-05-2008, 19:27
And some John Singer Sargent . . .

Zhenulka
08-05-2008, 00:18
As a confirmed paraxite, it's part of my practice just to get on other people's threads and make light. I am planning to start many of my own threads, but I will limit them to two categories:

(1) inflammatory topics (topics to come: which terrorist act most impressed you and which minority do you hate most), and

(2) topics exclusively about me and my own life (topics to come: I am smarter than you so don't spout crap; my mama needs a new boyfriend; is it OK that I cannot commit?; I had a rectal exam; I think I choke my chicken too often; does anyone have any advice for me? do you think I treated my date badly? among others oriented toward myself).

Although I have in the past only been a paraxite, I am inspired to open new threads, limited to the two categories above, "to keep the forum lively." Although I might open threads about YOU, the other forum members, it will be limited to what I think of you.

Let me know if any of them have been done before so that I don't get repetitive.

Oh, and Elis, you are a racist. LOL LOL LOL. Now, back to the paintings and quit hijacking. I'm off.

Ouch, Kirk, you got too agitated. Take it easy! Just imagine how enjoyable a paraxite life of leisure and pleasure can be! You don't need to lift a finger. All you do is find the right hosts and then you can suck, suck, suck their energy to a surfeit. I looove paraxiting!

I don't have any plans to start my own threads. The current ones started by other members are fatty enough for me to paraxite on for a long while!

Orion
08-05-2008, 00:29
"Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat" - Teddy

Transparent Theatre
08-05-2008, 00:42
http://www.wga.hu/art/f/friedric/2/209fried.jpg

Caspar David Friedrich 1774-1840

Zhenulka
08-05-2008, 00:54
Well, I am ashamed to admit that I am not particularly original in my choice of paintings. I am just one of those 100 million people or so who voted for the Sunflowers to be their favourite one. But the fact is that the bright sunny yellow is good for me. There is lots of energy in it to suck in.

The Red Fish by Matisse used to be my fave rave at school. It lay under my writing table cover throughout all my school years. I think that was because of similarity in our painting styles at that time :) (just kidding.)

And I am particularly partial to Vrubel, there is a whole hall at Tretyakovka devoted to him. Lots of amazing paintings there. His sad restless demon (in one of its versions) looks mesmerising.

elis
08-05-2008, 00:58
As a confirmed paraxite, it's part of my practice just to get on other people's threads and make light.

. . .

smarter than you so don't spout crap;

As a confirmed paraxite you should realize that it is not to "spout crap" but to "sput crap."


Oh, and Elis, you are a racist. LOL LOL LOL. Now, back to the paintings and quit hijacking. I'm off.

Yes. I figured that having a favorite painter who was anti-ears would show me up for the true bigot that I am. But I couldn't help myself.

Hat off.

pjw
08-05-2008, 01:44
I love Monet and Renoir. And I guess I like water somehow. Super thread btw......

elis
08-05-2008, 08:25
The Red Fish by Matisse used to be my fave rave at school. It lay under my writing table cover throughout all my school years. I think that was because of similarity in our painting styles at that time :) (just kidding.)


I love that Matisse one as well. (I stayed forever in the Matisse room at the Pushkin Museum. It was spectacular.)

kirk10071
08-05-2008, 10:07
For a little cultural diversity, you might enjoy a classic Chinese painting, about which you can read here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/14/arts/design/14asia.html;
a painting from the Indian artist Raja Ravi Varma, who painted Indian women so beautifully 100 years ago,
or from Latin America one of my favorites of Frida Kahlo, of whom I have always been very fond.

bambina
08-05-2008, 12:00
two more of my favorite Russian painters, one of them depicting somehow country I was born in. V. Veretshagin

elis
08-05-2008, 12:07
two more of my favorite Russian painters, one of them depicting somehow country I was born in. V. Veretshagin

The second one is somewhat disturbing...

bambina
08-05-2008, 12:26
Veretshagin all his life fought against war and wanted to show in his paintings what kind of damages a war can bring, this piture was dedicated to all conquerors in the past, present and future.

bambina
08-05-2008, 12:40
Initially painting was thought to be somehow depicting Asian conqueror Tamerlan who as they say used to leave those piles of skulls after each of his invading showing how powerfull he is. But the picture itself has a more deep meaning.

hazelnut
08-05-2008, 12:42
cool thread, thanks people! :iloveyou:

MissAnnElk
08-05-2008, 13:01
More local artists . . .

jumatre
08-05-2008, 14:54
That's like one of the scariest things ever! Gave me nightmares. Fabulous in its own right--without a doubt--but I'd be hard pressed to call it a favorite.

For me it is also very scary, but I love it because it shows the real phases of life... The most natural and impressive picture I have ever seen...

Orion
08-05-2008, 15:51
Then there is always this one...a fav...from mythology.

Orion
08-05-2008, 16:02
Cephalus and Aurora

Briolette.
08-05-2008, 17:18
13715

Briolette.
08-05-2008, 17:25
Для немецкую группу ...

13716

Korotky Gennady
08-05-2008, 23:08
...

Korotky Gennady
08-05-2008, 23:13
...

Zhenulka
09-05-2008, 00:35
I love that Matisse one as well. (I stayed forever in the Matisse room at the Pushkin Museum. It was spectacular.)

Oh, I love him too. I have special sentiments about him since attending an arts school in my childhood. We used to make sketches of his "Dancers" (they've already been posted by Briolette) as a way to learn expressing movement in drawing. I kept those sketches for a long time afterwards but then lost them somewhere during one of my moves, I believe. They were the best I've ever drawn. (And I am pretty bad at that I should confess).

I visited Matisse House-Museum in Nice last September (a very picturersque site by itself) and found lots of interesting pictures, including a few of his early ones which are completely different from fauvism and primitivistic style of his later works. But a series of "Dancers" and "Music", from Hermitage in St-Petersburg and the Red Fishes still remain my all-time favourite.

So you say the Pushkin museum has now the whole room devoted to him? Shame on me for not knowing!!! :bash: I should catch up on this asap. I haven't visited the contemporary section of Pushkin museum since they relocated there a couple of years ago. Last year when I visited Modgiliani exhibition in the main building I scoured about the halls in search of the impressionists and all and only later realized they were relocated to the new building. :(

anthonycasey
09-05-2008, 01:56
Very difficult to choose!
Off the top of my head, three of my favourites... Mark Ryden, Rossetti and Kandinsky.


http://www.theworldsbestever.com/2008/02/08/mark-ryden.jpg

http://www.mythindex.com/images/painting-persephone-sm.jpg

http://www.poster.net/kandinsky-wassily/kandinsky-wassily-dominant-curve-5300054.jpg

anthonycasey
09-05-2008, 02:18
Forgot this one... by Albert Moore

http://www.bmagshop.co.uk/assets/userimages/dreamers_2.jpg

Zhenulka
09-05-2008, 16:11
How could I forget about Modigliani? Thanks to Elis I recalled last year's exhibition of his paintings at Pushkin Museum. It was amazing! Just amazing!

So I started looking for his Woman with Necklace but then my internet connection broke up but now I am back with some of his female portraits. I love them, those prolonged shapes with often faintly visible features, so touching and delicate. Here are just a few of them.

Zhenulka
09-05-2008, 16:39
Yeps, also now that I've recalled Nice, I remember Le Musée du Message Biblique Marc-Chagall. It was a greater discovery to me than Matisse's museum there. Highly recommended!!!! The best attraction in Nice really! There are two of his biblical paintings from the museum (which I managed to source online) and a couple of the old ones I like.

Zhenulka
09-05-2008, 17:06
...

Thanks Gena for the Venus. I should make an awful confession. I had been so much looking forward to seeing the original at Uffizi but...my impression of it turned out to be less than I expected. The Birth of Venus and Primavera, planned as the high points of my visit, looked somewhat dull. I blame bad lighting. The colours just didn't look right, they seemed to be withered green instead of bright blue I was used to in reproductions. That was the only time when I preferred the colours of a reproduction picture to the real paiting. Very weird. :(

But the real discovered treasure at Uffizi for me is Michelangelo's Doni Tondo (The Holy Family). I can't say I was looking forward to seeing it but when I saw it next to the paintings of his contemporaries, not bad paintings at all, technically well done, it was enough for me to understand a difference between a good painter and a genius. Michelangelo's training as a sculptor shows in the dynamics of the painting when you look at it in real life (but not so apparent in reproduction). I had the impression that people in the painting were breathing and moving. So much alive it looked to me.

Zhenulka
09-05-2008, 17:21
And refering to the other painting thread on the Bruegels, I love this painting by the Elder one. It looks very nostalgic to me.

And, btw, Bambina, I love Serov's Girl with the Peaches too. I wanted to post it myself but you did it first.

Oooh, sorry, MissAnn, I just can't stop paraxiting on your thread. I could go on and on ... until I fully monopolize it. Please someone keep me in check! :bash: :locked:

MissAnnElk
09-05-2008, 19:11
Thanks Gena for the Venus.

I was trying to post some Botticelli, but my computer was not cooperating.

MissAnnElk
09-05-2008, 19:12
Oooh, sorry, MissAnn, I just can't stop paraxiting on your thread. I could go on and on ... until I fully monopolize it. Please someone keep me in check! :bash: :locked:

No, no! Don't apologize. This is great. What a fun thread.

Zhenulka
09-05-2008, 19:23
This is great. What a fun thread.

Totally agree!!!

pjw
09-05-2008, 23:43
I love this thread too and letīs not forget that the idea was kind of planted by Gena and his Bruegels avatar. Back to Modigliani. Itīs a paradox, but when he stopped his long neck phase, he was still exceptional, maybe even more so. I didnīt like the long necks and the long noses previously, but if you look without prejudice, it really is beautiful. Something special.

What is beauty anyway? Is all art beautiful? If not, what does a picture require to reach what we (all?) consider beautiful? Are there degrees of beauty? What defines them? Are some artists better than others? Artistic skill? Can it be learnt? Itīs such a wonderful topic. To those who havenīt posted their personal faves yet, come on, get posting!:SwoonLoveSmiley:
13733

elis
10-05-2008, 00:36
I love this thread too and letīs not forget that the idea was kind of planted by Gena and his Bruegels avatar. Back to Modigliani. Itīs a paradox, but when he stopped his long neck phase, he was still exceptional, maybe even more so. I didnīt like the long necks and the long noses previously, but if you look without prejudice, it really is beautiful. Something special.

What is beauty anyway? Is all art beautiful? If not, what does a picture require to reach what we (all?) consider beautiful? Are there degrees of beauty? What defines them? Are some artists better than others? Artistic skill? Can it be learnt? Itīs such a wonderful topic. To those who havenīt posted their personal faves yet, come on, get posting!:SwoonLoveSmiley:


Very thought provoking. (Agree, also with the Modigiani comments.)
I'm not sure if we could find one particular thing we "all" consider beautiful.

pjw
10-05-2008, 02:14
13734Goya Maja dressed13735

Goya Maja naked13736

Zhenulka
10-05-2008, 18:32
Pjw, thanks for Goya's Mayas. There is a whole novel by Lion Feuchtwanger devoted to Goya and his relationship with Duchess of Alba, who is thought to have been the model, and the history of these paintings (all fictionalized, of course) are a big part of the novel.

Here's my contribution for today. Degas' ballet dancers. NB: All of them painted with perfect proportions, btw. :)

is4fun
11-05-2008, 11:15
Very nice postings! Kirk you forgot Dogs Playing Pool. Mind you, the way the artist captured that dog that is cheating in the front was great.

These are not necessarily my favorites; however, much of his work I found does capture contemporary America.

Norman Rockwell