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stim
14-03-2008, 11:18
Everyone-
I am a freelance teacher from the USA, and was wondering if any other American citizens could tell me what they do about filing their taxes. Basically none of the schools I work for is willing to provide me with a letter verifying how much money I made; still, I need to file my US taxes. Can someone give me some advice?
Tim

Bels
14-03-2008, 11:55
If you're freelance, aren't you considered self emplyed. There aren't you the one supposed to provide the invoice or bill to the school. If not, you've had cash deals and it's not verifiable. Otherwise make your own invoices to supply to your American tax, because that's the proper procedure.

As a freelancer you are not employed, and the schools have no obligation to provide you with anything.

But what surprises me is that schools don't ask for receipts or invoices in return for payment of your services.

Proper Bostonian
14-03-2008, 19:20
I'm not a teacher but have always filed U.S. income taxes without any documentation from the organizations that employed me. I file as self-employed, list the name(s) of organizations that paid me & the amount converted into dollars. Have never submitted 1099s or other documentation & never had a problem. In case you are not aware, U.S. citizens do not pay federal income tax if their income is less than $80,000/year and they meet the requirements concerning time spent in the USA. I forget the # of days one can be in the States, but do know it's less than one month. The information is available on the IRS's web site. However, be aware that no matter what your earnings are you must file a return & you are still responsible for SSI & FICA which are worse than the federal tax. There are lots of forms to be filled in if you file as I do (self-employed with foreign earned income exemption), so you might want to hire an accountant in your home state.

stim
17-03-2008, 10:55
Proper Bostonian- thanks for the tips. Do you know where to find FICA and SSI documents? Are they on the IRS site also?
Tim

Proper Bostonian
21-03-2008, 12:36
Stim,

When you fill in your tax return & have completed all deductions, exemptions, etc. you will then be able to calculate what you owe. There aren't any special forms for SSI & FICA. You need to file a regular 1040 along with all other associated forms which apply to your situation - self-employed, foreign earned income, etc. which is why I suggested having an accountant do it for you. You can pick up 1040s at the USA Embassy and can probably download other forms from the IRS' Web site, but it is pretty tricky. Good luck!

th&vk
21-03-2008, 22:13
I just wanted to echo Proper Bostonian's excellent advice.
I don't even list the different organizations -- I just tell my accountant how much I earned in Russia (translated into dollars), lump sum, and he does the rest. He does the same for my husband who is a self-employed musician.
I also echo her advice -- have an accountant do it ... I'm always amazed how many pieces of paper are involved - for so little income!
Toni

Bels
21-03-2008, 22:31
I can't discuss American tax situations. But if you are acting as freelance in Russia, you are doing it illegally unless you have an entrepeneur's license. Your income is as such illegal and should not be declared to anyone.

Something that even the major macdonal schools appear to be ignoring. A freelancer is a self employed person who charges his own fees to companies, and has the legal stamp to bill or invoice this company. Legal companies should never pay fees to teachers without receiving this bill with the legal stamp. Otherwise they might have problems in the future.

MissAnnElk
21-03-2008, 22:35
In case you are not aware, U.S. citizens do not pay federal income tax if their income is less than $80,000/year and they meet the requirements concerning time spent in the USA. I forget the # of days one can be in the States, but do know it's less than one month.

I believe it is 34 days.

You also can file for an extension until August . . .