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Bels
13-03-2008, 23:43
Typical mistakes by students. Can you correct the mistakes? can you give an explanation of why they are wrong? Non natives of English only please. You can comment later once all answers have been given.

You must correct all three answers together, and you will receive three thanks from me. I wish it could be reputation points , but that's not possible here any more , due to you know what.

Sometimes it's more difficult to explain the reason of what you have corrected, but let's find out.

1:Some tribes have always fighted to preserve their own culture.
2;We broke down the door and found Mrs Brook laying on the carpet
3: I refused to let him to help me.

Sal often makes similar mistakes :)

SalTheReturn
14-03-2008, 00:03
Typical mistakes by students. Can you correct the mistakes? can you give an explanation of why they are wrong? Non natives of English only please. You can comment later once all answers have been given.

You must correct all three answers together, and you will receive three thanks from me. I wish it could be reputation points , but that's not possible here any more , due to you know what.

Sometimes it's more difficult to explain the reason of what you have corrected, but let's find out.

1:Some tribes have always fighted to preserve their own culture.
2;We broke down the door and found Mrs brook laying on the carpet
3: I refused to let him to help me.

Sal often makes similar mistakes :)

1)have always fought
2)Brook must be capitalized
3)I refused to let him helping me
I refused his help

Katrine L
14-03-2008, 00:32
1:Some tribes always fight (or have fought) to preserve their own culture.
2;We broke down the door and found Mrs brook had laid on the carpet
3: I refused him to help me.

Evgeniya
14-03-2008, 00:35
I think so:
1. Some tribes have allways fought for preserving their own culture.
2. We broke down the door and found Mrs Broot lying on the carpet. ( lying instead of laying)
3. I refuse to let him help me. ( After the verb "let" we can't use "to")

Bels
14-03-2008, 00:37
1:Some tribes always fight (or have fought) to preserve their own culture.
2;We broke down the door and found Mrs brook had laid on the carpet
3: I refused him to help me.

Nearly:

Some tribes have always fought to preserve their own culture.
We broke down the door and found Mrs Brook lying on the carpet
I refused to let him help me


Can anyone explain why ?

Natkin
14-03-2008, 00:58
1. Fight is irregular verb
2. To lay is an action towards subject: I lay my glasses near the bed.
3. No infinitive after "let"

Gypsy
14-03-2008, 05:30
Typical mistakes by students. Can you correct the mistakes? can Capital letter for Can
you give an explanation of why they are wrong? Non natives of English only please. You can comment later once all answers have been given.

You must correct all three answers together, and you will receive three thanks from me. I wish it could be reputation points , but that's not possible here any more , due to you know what.

Sometimes it's more difficult to explain the reason of FOR not of
what you have corrected, but let's find out.

1:Some tribes have always fighted to preserve their own culture.
2;We broke down the door and found Mrs brook laying on the carpet
3: I refused to let him to help me.

Sal often makes similar mistakes :)

SalTheReturn
14-03-2008, 10:36
can someone tell me if i did a good job?

for instance i knew to let takes then NO infinitive

the questions were intermediate anyway, no more

Bels
14-03-2008, 11:17
Nearly:

Some tribes have always fought to preserve their own culture.
We broke down the door and found Mrs brook lying on the carpet
I refused to let him help me


Can anyone explain why ?

Fight, fought, fought.
Lie is always intransitive: “He lay on the floor asleep.”
Lay is nearly always transitive: “She laid her books on the chair.”
Let someone + infinitive without to

Bels
14-03-2008, 11:25
1)have always fought
2)Brook must be capitalized
3)I refused to let him helping me
I refused his help


Correct answers: Some tribes have always fought to preserve their own culture.
We broke down the door and found Mrs brook lying on the carpet
I refused to let him help me

1 out 3 Sal. Well done. And well done to those who got 3 out 3, and gave good explanations as to why the sentences were wrong. You have my thanks.

And thank you native English speakers for not hi-jacking the thread.

Bels
14-03-2008, 11:43
Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please. Or you will be reported this time :) :rules:


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.

Olenka19
14-03-2008, 15:16
1. He was clean-shaved.
2. This morning I have gone (if it is still the morning) shopping.
3. She spoke very shortly how they had been living during the war.

SalTheReturn
14-03-2008, 16:15
Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please. Or you will be reported this time :) :rules:


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.

this morning i went shopping

elis
14-03-2008, 17:17
Not replying to any of the questions, so no need to report me.

Just letting you know that poor Mrs Brook deserves to have a capital letter. (And if she were American, she should have a period after her married status.)

MickeyTong
14-03-2008, 17:49
she should have a period after her married status.

In Britain a headache is the usual excuse......

Natkin
14-03-2008, 17:58
In Britain a headache is the usual excuse......

Geez and I was sure we Russians invented it....:gorgeous:

Bels
14-03-2008, 18:31
Not replying to any of the questions, so no need to report me.

Just letting you know that poor Mrs Brook deserves to have a capital letter. (And if she were American, she should have a period after her married status.)

And what about her marriage status.

Bels
14-03-2008, 18:39
this morning i went shopping

Wel done Sal, I hope you deserve a capital letter to your name. The other two sentences are not yet correct. Why not have a go.

Bels
14-03-2008, 18:43
Not replying to any of the questions, so no need to report me.

Just letting you know that poor Mrs Brook deserves to have a capital letter. (And if she were American, she should have a period after her married status.)

I repeat, please correct the sentences, all of each sentence, and not one simple detail of a sentence.

Natkin
14-03-2008, 18:48
His face was clean-shaved
She spoke shortly about how they lived during the war.

And if I am wrong, have mercy - I am busy dressing to go party!!!

Bels
14-03-2008, 18:54
His face was clean-shaved
She spoke shortly about how they lived during the war.

And if I am wrong, have mercy - I am busy dressing to go party!!!

Sorry you're wrong. I hope you enjoy your party.

MissAnnElk
14-03-2008, 18:54
Lie is always intransitive: “He lay on the floor asleep.”
Lay is nearly always transitive: “She laid her books on the chair.”


My mother always drilled into us that "Lay is to put or place. Lie is to rest or recline."

Americans like to "lay out in the sun" which just goes through me like a knife.

"Where are you going?"
"I thought I'd go lay out for a while."

:9451::9451::9451:

elis
14-03-2008, 19:49
I repeat, please correct the sentences, all of each sentence, and not one simple detail of a sentence.

You said you would report non-native speakers answering the quiz questions. So, I played by the rules. Or, do you consider Americans non-native English speakers...:suspect:

Bels
14-03-2008, 20:00
You said you would report non-native speakers answering the quiz questions. So, I played by the rules. Or, do you consider Americans non-native English speakers...:suspect:

I'm sorry, nye panemayo. I don't undertand what you mean. Where have I stated that I don't consider Americans as non-native speakers. And how do you justify your claim that you played by the rules.

Gypsy
14-03-2008, 20:07
I'm sorry, nye panemayo. I don't undertand what you mean. Where have I stated that I don't consider Americans as non-native speakers. And how do you justify your claim that you played by the rules.

You wrote that english speakers were to allow non english speakers to answer first.

This Elis did - thereby playing by the rules.

elis
14-03-2008, 20:11
You wrote that english speakers were to allow non english speakers to answer first.

This Elis did - thereby playing by the rules.

Spasiba. Nuf said.

Bels
14-03-2008, 20:21
Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please. Or you will be reported this time :) :rules:


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.

Where do I invite native speakers?

Gypsy
14-03-2008, 20:25
Where do I invite native speakers?


You can comment later once all answers have been given.

You appear to have forgotten writing this immediately after the "Non Native speakers " comment. And then failed to include it in the quote in your previous post. Both genuine mistakes I'm sure.

elis
14-03-2008, 20:30
Non natives of English only please. You can comment later once all answers have been given.




Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please. Or you will be reported this time :) :rules:




Where do I invite native speakers?

You didn't invite natives. That's my point. I'm a native. You said we could comment "later." Which is what I did. You said "natives" would be reported. So, I thought I'd be goofy (see some other thread for definition thereof), and yank your chain about Brits not considering Americans "native English speakers." Geeze...I didn't mean for it to get so polemic.

Back to the quiz, shall we?

Bels
14-03-2008, 20:41
You appear to have forgotten writing this immediately after the "Non Native speakers " comment. And then failed to include it in the quote in your previous post. Both genuine mistakes I'm sure.

You appear to have me baffled. Because I can't find such a quote on any of my posts on this particular thread. Do you mean another thread?. If so, I had good reason to avoid such an invitation in this particular thread.

However I stand corrected Elis, because I forgot to put the capital letter in the answers. However it wasn't the major fault in the sentence.

SalTheReturn
14-03-2008, 20:49
His face was clean-shaved
She spoke shortly about how they lived during the war.

And if I am wrong, have mercy - I am busy dressing to go party!!!

i envy you, here fri nights are so dull!!!

would get back to moscow just for the nightlife, really:mooooh::mooooh::mooooh:

enjoy yr party

Bels
14-03-2008, 20:49
Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please. Or you will be reported this time :) :rules:


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.

There are still two sentences not corrected properly, sal has corrected the second one.

Who can correct all three sentences in the same post.

Gypsy
14-03-2008, 20:51
You appear to have me baffled. Because I can't find such a quote on any of my posts on this particular thread. Do you mean another thread?. If so, I had good reason to avoid such an invitation in this particular thread.

Really?

Elis has quoted it above as well as me.

Try looking at your first post in the thread, 4th sentence.

Bels
14-03-2008, 20:53
i envy you, here fri nights are so dull!!!

would get back to moscow just for the nightlife, really:mooooh::mooooh::mooooh:

enjoy yr party

Just get on with the quiz sal, and stop dreaming about parties. You have only got two more to correct.

Bels
14-03-2008, 21:03
I repeat:

Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please.


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.[/QUOTE]

Olenka19
14-03-2008, 21:30
In Britain a headache is the usual excuse......

And not only in Britain:agree:

Bels
14-03-2008, 22:12
And not only in Britain:agree:

Oy!! Dont encourage the natives to hi-jack this thread. Get on with the quiz, as there are two more questions to correct :)

Bels
14-03-2008, 22:16
We'll try again:




I repeat:

Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please.


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.[/QUOTE]

Katrine L
14-03-2008, 22:56
He had the clean-shaved face.
This morning I have gone for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had living during the war.

Bels
14-03-2008, 23:15
These are the answers:

He had a clean shaven face
This morning I went shopping
They spoke very briefly about how they had lived during the war.

Can anyone clearly explain the reasons.

YES! native speakers are welcome , but if there is a non native speaker who can beat them to it, all participants must give that non native ten thank yous. (don't comment on yous)

Bels
14-03-2008, 23:23
A question , is this quiz tough enough for natives? should it be put on Expat cafe.

Or how would the countdown game go for EFL students? Could it work? Should it be made easier? How can it be made easier? A larger number of letters for example.

Yes!! this question is for all members.especially teachers and students.

Olenka19
14-03-2008, 23:52
BTW we are taught that the verb shave in Past Participle has 2 forms: shaved or shaven. Like dremed\dreamt and so on. Were thea right?

Bels
15-03-2008, 00:05
BTW we are taught that the verb shave in Past Participle has 2 forms: shaved or shaven. Like dremed\dreamt and so on. Were thea right?


Very close, explanation later. clue:exception.

An adjective used in compound form. to be clean-shaven. As a verb in the past participle we usually use shaved. Have you shaved today?

SalTheReturn
15-03-2008, 00:27
BTW we are taught that the verb shave in Past Participle has 2 forms: shaved or shaven. Like dremed\dreamt and so on. Were thea right?

actually dremed is a neologism LOL

SalTheReturn
15-03-2008, 00:27
btw, if u dont get it, this thread is about correcting Bels students'homework LOL LOL LOL

Bels
15-03-2008, 12:24
An adjective when used as a compound, to be clean-shaven. in this case we use shaven. The past partiсiple of the verb is usually shaved.
Have you shaved yet.

dream, dreamed, dreamed or dreamt.
shave, shaved, shaved or shaven.

an example of irregular verb, read, read, read.

Gypsy
15-03-2008, 14:17
An adjective when used as a compound, to be clean-shaven. Is what exactly? What is it? This is not actually a sentence in english. It needs a verb.
in this case we use shaven. The past partivible of the verb is . The first letter of the first word of a sentence should be a capital. I think participle is usually spelled with a "c" not a "v".

SalTheReturn
15-03-2008, 17:05
Is what exactly? What is it? This is not actually a sentence in english. It needs a verb. The first letter of the first word of a sentence should be a capital. I think participle is usually spelled with a "c" not a "v".

Gypsy, he must do that on purpose. If not I am ready to advocate his ban.

Penelope
17-03-2008, 12:30
Also, why can't someone speak "shortly" about something. Why must it be "briefly"?

Gypsy
17-03-2008, 12:36
Also, why can't someone speak "shortly" about something. Why must it be "briefly"?

I have always thought that the two things have quite different meanings -to speak shortly means to speak with someone in a short while, ie very soon. To speak briefly is to have a short, brief conversation.

pullar
17-03-2008, 15:38
Also, why can't someone speak "shortly" about something. Why must it be "briefly"?

British barristers use 'shortly' in this context all the time:

To put matters shortly, my client was indeed extremely drunk.

Gypsy
17-03-2008, 16:37
British barristers use 'shortly' in this context all the time:

To put matters shortly, my client was indeed extremely drunk.

Ok -didn't know that. Thank you.

ps "Extremely drunk at the time," presumably. To quote a very famous barrister.

MissAnnElk
17-03-2008, 16:50
I think if an American says "I will speak about that shortly" we mean "I will get to it soon . . ."

Penelope
17-03-2008, 16:53
But can't it mean the same thing when it's in the past tense? To me this sentence sounds completely normal:
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.
In other words, "She spoke for a short time about how they had lived during the war."

MissAnnElk
17-03-2008, 17:03
But can't it mean the same thing when it's in the past tense? To me this sentence sounds completely normal:
In other words, "She spoke for a short time about how they had lived during the war."

I think you can say that. I might say "little while" or "briefly" but if you said this I wouldn't notice . . . by that, I mean it wouldn't strike me as odd at all.

alterego
17-03-2008, 18:22
To be short with someone, or possibly to speak shortly with someone, would mean to be harsh or rude. Probably similar to being curt, which is to be rude by speaking in very short, maybe one word, sentences.
Grammatically 'shortly' could have meant the same as 'briefly' but for some reason it took on a different meaning and now we're stuck with it. Most of us anyways, apparently the British barristers are not constrained by this traditional use.

Bels
17-03-2008, 18:57
Shortly= impatiently; not politely: " He answered rather shortly that he was not the slightest bit interested.

Briefly= for a short time.

Alterego as usual, is correct in his explanation.

Penelope
17-03-2008, 19:05
In fact, Merriam Webster's Dictionary gives Briefly as the first definition, and "in an abrupt manner" as the second definition.
shortly - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shortly)
shortly
One entry found.

shortly



Main Entry: short·ly
Pronunciation: \ˈshȯrt-lē\
Function: adverb
Date: before 12th century
1 a: in a few words : briefly b: in an abrupt manner
2 a: in a short time <we will be there shortly> b: at a short interval <shortly after sunset>

pullar
17-03-2008, 23:03
Finally and to put matters shortly,' resumed Arkady, ‘he is a man desperately unhappy, not one who ought to be despised.'

This comes from a translation of Fathers and Sons, published by Wordsworth in 1996.

Bels
17-03-2008, 23:16
In fact, Merriam Webster's Dictionary gives Briefly as the first definition, and "in an abrupt manner" as the second definition.
shortly - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shortly)

Please accept the explanations about briefly as fact, coming from Longman's and Cambridge. The use of shortly will be looked upon as an inappropriate word in such examples of sentence. If you wish to deny it, that's your problem. You've had two very good teachers who have informed you.

Penelope
18-03-2008, 11:38
But they wouldn't be wrong if the student were taking an American EFL test, as Webster's is America's premeire dictionary--and the one used as the in-house publishing standard for my company, for example.

MissAnnElk
18-03-2008, 12:48
England and America: Two nations separated by a common language.

Bels
18-03-2008, 13:12
I have no statements in any of my reference books that the word briefly is used differently. All students course books, and teachers resource books usually inform us when there is a difference between the British and American language. Hopefully the American English course books and dictionaries explain the same vice versa.

Gypsy
18-03-2008, 13:16
I have no statements in any of my reference books that the word briefly is used differently. All students course books, and teachers resource books usually inform us when there is a difference between the British and American language. Hopefully the American English course books and dictionaries explain the same vice versa.

Since the debate was about different usage of shortly this would not have helped anyway.

Bels
18-03-2008, 20:43
Here is four more sentences for you to correct:

All the passengers carried their own baggages.
Paula had five baggages.
An ambulance arrived and carried her to the hospital.
I advise you to eat something now in case there won’t be any food when we get there

I think they are easy for non natives of English, but the last one might be tricky.

Natkin
18-03-2008, 21:01
All the passengers carried their own luggage.
Paula had five pieces of baggage.
An ambulance arrived and took her to the hospital.

Still on the tricky one.

Zhenulka
18-03-2008, 22:08
I advise you to eat something now in case there won’t be any food when we get there

I think they are easy for non natives of English, but the last one might be tricky.

Not tricky at all! The correct one can read like, e.g.: I advise you to eat something now in case there is no food when we get there.

Bels
18-03-2008, 22:29
Not tricky at all! The correct one can read like, e.g.: I advise you to eat something now in case there is no food when we get there.

Tricky I believe depending on what level you are in English as a non-native.
So yes you are correct. Here's the answers:

All the passengers carried their own baggage
Baggage is uncountable

An ambulance arrived and took her to the hospital
A vehicle takes someone somewhere.

I advise you to eat something now in case there isn’t any food when we get there.
After in case use the present simple tense for future reference. Not shall will + verb:
Take an umbrella in case it rains.

I will accept luggage, if you had said luggages I wouldn't have done. Therefore it's a correct answer

Bels
18-03-2008, 22:35
All the passengers carried their own luggage.
Paula had five pieces of baggage.
An ambulance arrived and took her to the hospital.

Still on the tricky one.

All three are correct, but " carried their own baggage would also have been correct.

" five pieces of baggage! Very good, just like five glasses of milk. We are talking about uncountable nouns.

Welldone!! three out of three. It beats sal's 1 out of three. And he stated it was only iintermediate level.

Let's not forget that I'm using common errors createted by some very good EFL students.

And if you were in a group in my class you would have your work swopped and then you you would have to correct each other.

Zhenulka
18-03-2008, 23:40
I advise you to eat something now in case there isn’t any food when we get there.
After in case use the present simple tense for future reference. Not shall will + verb:
Take an umbrella in case it rains.

Expounding the above case for non-native speakers:

As long as you remember the rule that in conditional and time clauses the future tense is never used (which refers to all prepositions introducing time/condition clauses) you will be safe with the present tense in reference to present/future events.

Bels
20-03-2008, 21:11
This time easy I hope.

He was a bit embarrassed of what he had said.
Since nobody would lend me the money, I ended asking my father for it.
Nowadays very few criminals end in jail.

Natkin
20-03-2008, 23:36
He was a bit embarrased with what he had said.
Since nobody would lend me the money, I ended up asking my father for it.
Nowadays very few criminals end up in jail.

Bels
20-03-2008, 23:45
He was a bit embarrased with what he had said.
Since nobody would lend me the money, I ended up asking my father for it.
Nowadays very few criminals end up in jail.

Correct for two; but the first one is wrong.

Natkin
21-03-2008, 01:58
Oops...
He was a bit embarrased with what he said.

Bels
21-03-2008, 10:00
Not with.

Natkin
21-03-2008, 10:44
I am not the sharpest tool in the box at 2 am, I guess. You can post the correct answer now, coz I am NOT cheating!

Bels
21-03-2008, 11:04
He was a bit embarrassed by what he had said
(Be) embarrassed by something, NOT of.
END
Since nobody would lend me the money, I ended up asking my father for it
Nowadays very few criminals end up in jail

Bels
22-03-2008, 17:08
Please correct the following sentences:

1. In my opinion people must to do something about the problem.
2. People are not as careful as they must be and drop their litter on the streets.
3. The pupils mustn’t go to the meeting if they don’t want to.
4. If you can’t find her, she must hide somewhere.
5. When immersed in water, the cloth narrows.

kapione
22-03-2008, 17:28
More good work people ! :-)
I try to teach my students this materials too , very helpful for all levels !

Zhenulka
22-03-2008, 17:49
1. In my opinion people must do something about the problem.
2. People are not as careful as they should be and drop their litter on the streets.
3. The pupils don't have to go to the meeting if they don't want to.
4. If you can't find her she must be hiding somewhere.
5. When immersed in water, the cloth shrinks.

Bels
22-03-2008, 19:21
1. In my opinion people must do something about the problem.
2. People are not as careful as they should be and drop their litter on the streets.
3. The pupils don't have to go to the meeting if they don't want to.
4. If you can't find her she must be hiding somewhere.
5. When immersed in water, the cloth shrinks.

In sentence three I was looking for; The pupils needn't go to the meeting if they don't want to. However both versions are correct, hence all correct.

Well done, perhaps you're bi-lingual.

Bels
22-03-2008, 19:53
Both correct in American, please correct them for British English.

I paid for the radio by check
Although he had invited me, he asked me to pay the check

IraM
22-03-2008, 23:49
1) check - cheque
2) check - bill

Bels
23-03-2008, 00:06
1) check - cheque
2) check - bill

Thank you Ira, I'm glad to see that you are sharp on the differences of American English and British English English. It's very important, and I wish the Moscow Times was aware of this :)

alterego
23-03-2008, 07:23
So does one pay
their bill with a check/cheque
or their check/cheque with a bill

Bels
24-03-2008, 22:56
The best comes from real life conversation from my Russian family, and the questions they ask.

Please correct the following sentences:

1. As bald as brass
2. What we saw in front of us was the bald outline of a mountain.
3. The bold man forgot his wig
4. It is not possible to take a bath along the coast, because the sea is badly polluted

Zhenulka
25-03-2008, 00:02
1. As bold as brass
2. What we saw in front of us was the bold outline of a mountain. (On the other hand I don't see why it can't be the bald outline of a mountain :))
3. The bald man forgot his wig.
4. It is not possible to take a swim along the coast because the sea is badly polluted (on the other hand, if one can't take a swim because of pollution, taking a bath would be highly unadvised too :))

Bels
25-03-2008, 00:26
Very good 3 out of 4. Although number four should be given the benifit of a doubt.

Take a bath= wash yourself (and relax) in a bath.
bathe=swim
So the best answer would be ; It is not possible to bathe along this coast because the coast is badly polluted.

What do other teachers think? Should I be give her 4/4 for this one. Or 3/4

Bels
25-03-2008, 00:29
Sorry, this is not intended as a Gypsy :) :bash: taking a bath would be highly unadvised too.

Can anyone correct this :)

Zhenulka
25-03-2008, 11:15
Sorry, this is not intended as a Gypsy :) :bash: taking a bath would be highly unadvised too.

Can anyone correct this :)

May I correct myself? taking a bath would be strongly inadvisable.
As for your "Gypsy" comment don't worry I won't get offended at being corrected in English. It's nothing but a foreign language to me. So all corrections are most welcome.

Penelope
25-03-2008, 11:30
Taking a bath would be highly ill advised, too.

OR

Taking a bath would be highly unadvisable, too.

Zhenulka
25-03-2008, 12:59
Hmm, my dictionary gives "inadvisable", not "unadvisable". So which one is correct?

Gypsy
25-03-2008, 13:05
I was always taught that advisable went with In not Un.

kirk10071
25-03-2008, 13:11
I was always taught that advisable went with In not Un.
Me too. Maybe it was a typo. U and I are next to each other on the keyboard.

Transparent Theatre
25-03-2008, 13:17
I was always taught that advisable went with In not Un.

And your teachers were right :)

Although it's rather anal* sometimes, the Style Guide in MS-Word (y'know, those green underlinings you get in your text...) is usually a very reliable guide to standard usage. By all means be creative and ignore it if you are confident that you wish to go your own way... but it's a very useful tool for those whose first language isn't English, and moreover it's free if you already have MS-Word.

*it especially dislikes passive forms, and will usually suggest a rewrite that avoids them. This can produce rather dull prose if used frequently.


Meanwhile, someone will now tell us all the difference between "highly flammable" and "highly inflammable"....

Bels
25-03-2008, 13:20
Hmm, my dictionary gives "inadvisable", not "unadvisable". So which one is correct?

Inadvisable is correct.

Penelope
25-03-2008, 13:30
Hmm, my dictionary gives "inadvisable", not "unadvisable". So which one is correct?


I was always taught that advisable went with In not Un.


Me too. Maybe it was a typo. U and I are next to each other on the keyboard.


Inadvisable is correct.
unadvisable - Synonyms from the Merriam-Webster Online Thesaurus (http://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/unadvisable)

unadvisable

One entry found.

unadvisable[adjective]
Entry Word: unadvisable
Function: adjective
Text: showing poor judgment especially in personal relationships or social situations <it's unadvisable to try to take six classes in a single semester> — see indiscreet


inadvisable - Synonyms from the Merriam-Webster Online Thesaurus (http://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/inadvisable)

inadvisable
One entry found.

inadvisable[adjective]
Entry Word: inadvisable
Function: adjective
Text: showing poor judgment especially in personal relationships or social situations <it's inadvisable to have public arguments in the hallways> — see indiscreet

Zhenulka
25-03-2008, 13:38
Hmm, it must be one more instance of a difference between two countries "that have everything in common but a common language" :)

Penelope
25-03-2008, 13:39
...Meanwhile, someone will now tell us all the difference between "highly flammable" and "highly inflammable"....
There is no difference.

Bels
25-03-2008, 13:49
I think Kirk is American, and he disagrees also.

kirk10071
25-03-2008, 13:58
I never heard of "unadvisable" but apparently Penelope heard of it and it's in the dictionary so she's not the only one. My grandmother called a couch a "davenport" so maybe it's a regional thing? Also, to be honest, I never paid attention.

Penelope
25-03-2008, 14:25
I think Kirk is American, and he disagrees also.
with what?

kirk10071
25-03-2008, 14:31
with what?

Pretty much everything these days. :cry:

Bels
25-03-2008, 14:41
with what?

Look just above your post, he's answered your question.

Penelope
25-03-2008, 14:44
Look just above your post, he's answered your question.
So you are able to see the future and knew he would post that before? I thought you might be responding to my post in response to Transparent Theater's about "flammable" and "inflammable".

Bels
25-03-2008, 15:28
So you are able to see the future and knew he would post that before? I thought you might be responding to my post in response to Transparent Theater's about "flammable" and "inflammable".

Flammable and inflammable is easy, and please don't change the prefixes.

Back to the first subject:Ref: A pasting from Cambridge dictionary

Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press (http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.asp?searchword=unadvisable&x=33&y=6)

QUOTE: Cambridge advanced learners Dictionary
inadvisable
adjective
unwise and likely to have unwanted results and therefore worth avoiding:
Skiing is inadvisable if you have a weak heart.
It is inadvisable to generalize from the results of a single experiment.

(from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

unadvisable was not found in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

unadvisable was found in the Dictionnaire Cambridge Klett Compact in the following entries:
unadvisable ( French dictionary I think :) )


However I found this;

Unadvised
(Adjective) Not discreet or wise
Unadvisedly (adverb) rashly

Penelope
25-03-2008, 15:30
Bels, what does Cambridge dictionary say about inflammable and flammable?

Bels
25-03-2008, 15:37
So you are able to see the future and knew he would post that before? I thought you might be responding to my post in response to Transparent Theater's about "flammable" and "inflammable".

Where's your question regarding flammable, as I can't find it.Can you post it again?

Bels
25-03-2008, 15:51
Re: Oxford Dictionary

Flammable: adjective (= inflammable
But preferred in US and in technical contexts) having a tendency to burst into flames and to burn rapidly

Inflammable: 1. Easily set on fire. 2. Easily excited

Penelope
25-03-2008, 15:57
Where's your question regarding flammable, as I can't find it.Can you post it again?
I did not post a question, but an answer. Flammable and inflammable mean the same thing.

Etoile filante
18-05-2008, 14:24
Here is one more example of another typical mistake:
"We have not much time"

Albertina
19-05-2008, 23:20
What's wrong with this thread - I can't turn to page 8 :locked:

Acoreana
19-05-2008, 23:57
Yeah, many differences between American and British English, grammar, phrases, spelling, etc...but then, there is Canadian English, Australian English, etc...I grew up learning in a British and then Canadian school system before finishing off in an American one. Also my EFL certificate is American.
Met a guy from Australia and was constantly asking him to repeat himself!!! LOL!!! "What did you say?? What's a bilibong again?" :book:

xSnoofovich
20-05-2008, 11:04
Back to the first subject:Ref: A pasting from Cambridge dictionary

Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press (http://dictionary.cambridge.org/results.asp?searchword=unadvisable&x=33&y=6)

QUOTE: Cambridge advanced learners Dictionary
inadvisable
adjective
unwise and likely to have unwanted results and therefore worth avoiding:
Skiing is inadvisable if you have a weak heart.
It is inadvisable to generalize from the results of a single experiment.

(from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

unadvisable was not found in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

unadvisable was found in the Dictionnaire Cambridge Klett Compact in the following entries:
unadvisable ( French dictionary I think :) )


However I found this;

Unadvised
(Adjective) Not discreet or wise
Unadvisedly (adverb) rashly


And dictionary.com gives this -

unadvisable

adjective
not prudent or wise; not recommended; "running on the ice is inadvisable" [syn: inadvisable] [ant: advisable]

unadvisable - Definitions from Dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/unadvisable)

xSnoofovich
20-05-2008, 11:12
1) check - cheque
2) check - bill

i dont know what part of america you are from Bels - but, where i am from, we say bill. when was the last time you were there?

xSnoofovich
20-05-2008, 11:16
Very good 3 out of 4. Although number four should be given the benifit of a doubt.

Take a bath= wash yourself (and relax) in a bath.
bathe=swim
So the best answer would be ; It is not possible to bathe along this coast because the coast is badly polluted.

What do other teachers think? Should I be give her 4/4 for this one. Or 3/4

bathe Pronunciation[beyth] verb, bathed, bath·ing, noun
–verb (used with object) 1. to immerse (all or part of the body) in water or some other liquid, for cleansing, refreshment, etc.
2. to wet; wash.
3. to moisten or suffuse with any liquid.
4. to apply water or other liquid to, with a sponge, cloth, etc.: to bathe a wound.
5. to wash over or against, as by the action of the sea, a river, etc.: incoming tides bathing the coral reef.
6. to cover or surround: a shaft of sunlight bathing the room; a morning fog bathing the city.
–verb (used without object) 7. to take a bath or sunbath.
8. to swim for pleasure.
9. to be covered or surrounded as if with water.
–noun
10. British. the act of bathing, esp. in the sea, a lake, or a river; a swimming bath.


She should have 4/4.

grundie
28-05-2008, 09:57
He had a clean-shaved face. shaven
This morning I went for shopping. delete for or add the after for
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war. briefly is better than shortly

Albertina
03-06-2008, 23:26
It's very funny to me when one of our American guys at work always says 'optically' instead of 'visually'. For example: 'This analysis is optically better, or something like that. He is a native speaker, but it sounds wrong...

MickeyTong
03-06-2008, 23:59
American guys ....... a native speaker, but it sounds wrong...
Yes, well, they have drifted from the Mother Country and don't know any better.

Bels
04-06-2008, 00:09
It's very funny to me when one of our American guys at work always says 'optically' instead of 'visually'. For example: 'This analysis is optically better, or something like that. He is a native speaker, but it sounds wrong...

From the top of my head , although it’s late and I do lack the use of my resource books, so I do feel a bit insecure without them, but we do have an optic glass often referred to as a measurement of liquid, such as spirits.

Sorry, but this word is inappropriate in many cases. But maybe it is ok in American English. I am now curious. Is it ok to use the word optically rather a for example “A good visual display”?

Albertina
04-06-2008, 00:13
No, I rang Elisabeth and she reckons it's wrong :farout:

Bels
04-06-2008, 00:17
On top of my head again, without referring to grammar books, optic appears to be an additional description of a noun, optic lenses, optic glasses, optic nerve.

Or an Optician, a professional in the science of vision.

Bels
04-06-2008, 00:37
No, I rang Elisabeth and she reckons it's wrong :farout:

As a teacher I try very hard to teach the British English, as you can't escape it, as all the best English teaching publications are Briitish English, and for example the publications for statee and privat schools in Russia are Cambridge publications, pronounciation is taught by the IPA system, and is internationally recognised in Russia and most other countries.

Even so, I will always teach the differences of American English when I can, and neither will be wrong. The wrong will be when you mix both languages in an exam, you must not mix. For example if you become a translater, or a journalist, or you may well be writing representing a British company or an American company, you may well sound very funny to a native speaker. Believe me, it happens all the time. You must know the differences.

Such as color-colour, tire-tyre.

I'm feeling very tired now, time for bed :)

Bels
04-06-2008, 00:38
No, I rang Elisabeth and she reckons it's wrong :farout:


Is it not Elizabeth :) Or is it Elisa :)

Albertina
04-06-2008, 08:23
On top of my head again, without referring to grammar books, optic appears to be an additional description of a noun, optic lenses, optic glasses, optic nerve.

Or an Optician, a professional in the science of vision.

Accoustically, it does not sound right.

xSnoofovich
04-06-2008, 09:02
Such as colour-colour, tire-tire.



what is wrong with colour-colour? and tire-tire? ;)

color and colour? tyre and tire?

Gypsy
04-06-2008, 09:53
optic lenses, optic glasses, optic nerve Pretty sure the 1st 2 should be optical as they are adjectives and the last is optic nerve because that is its name.


As a teacher I try very hard to teach the Why "the"?
British English, as you can't escape it, as all the best English teaching publications are Briitish English, and for example the publications for statee and privat schools in Russia are Cambridge publications, pronounciation is taught by the IPA system, and is internationally recognised in Russia and most other countries. This sentence is not any form of english. Three phrases in succession starting with "as". What is a "statee"? And private has an "e" on the end in english. Publications is written twice in one sentence. Pronunciation is correct, there is no "o" after the 1st "n", and it should be the 1st word of a new sentence. There should be no comma after "system" since "and" makes it redundant and "internationally recognised in Russia and most other countries" is tautological at best and gibberish at worst.


Even so, I will always teach the differences of American English when I can, and neither will be wrong. The wrong will be when you mix both languages in an exam, you must not mix. For example if you become a translater, translator in english.
or a journalist, or you may well be writing representing a British company or an American company, you may well sound very funny to a native speaker. Believe me, it happens all the time. You must know the differences.

Such as colour-colour, tire-tire. Or color - colour and tire - tyre?

xSnoofovich
04-06-2008, 18:32
As a teacher I try very hard to teach the British English, as you can't escape it

We, Americans, did a pretty good job, as we don't speak British English ;)
In fact, we speak a purer, more advanced form of English.




as all the best English teaching publications are Briitish English,

Well, they are in the UK anyways. ;)

xSnoofovich
04-06-2008, 18:39
Is it ok to use the word optically rather a for example “A good visual display”?

Nope.

Well, not if you want to sound edumacated anyways.

MickeyTong
04-06-2008, 19:22
As a teacher I try very hard to teach the British English...
Most of us already speak English.

Bels
04-06-2008, 22:09
We, Americans, did a pretty good job, as we don't speak British English ;)
In fact, we speak a purer, more advanced form of English.

Have you always taught based on American publications. Do you always state , when one of your students speak or write in British English as being incorrect, or do you explain the differences. That is my argument.

I am not concerned in getting into the argument of which is the purest of English, as we are winning anyway. Watch out !! :) Paddington Bear is on the way :) To show the world how English should be spoken :)

Well, they are in the UK anyways. ;)

And in my area. I have done rather well promoting British English, if I didn't, I would simply promote native English, but I do better in my area promoting British English, as that is what they want as I said,and I repeat in my area.

Bels
04-06-2008, 22:31
Nope.

Well, not if you want to sound edumacated anyways.

So a good visual display sounds better if you say "A good optical display" ?

Are you looking through a looking glass or are you not :) :)

I hve now looked at my resource books. Now!!! What do you claim :) As I have given you a clue of the differences. I am now convinced it is not an American or British difference. And the use of the word is international.

But be careful. Americans PLEASE!!! Givive me examples of where you would use optical or optically. My belief is tht it's either looking though gl**** or for scientific purposes. The best I can find is an "Optical illusion".

Bels
04-06-2008, 22:42
Optically and visually are both adverbs. But be careful, as you can't use both, depending in what sentence you use. It's more likely that you will find visual as the most likely word that you wil bel most commonly use in a sentence.

xSnoofovich
05-06-2008, 10:27
or fiber optics?

xSnoofovich
05-06-2008, 10:31
So a good visual display sounds better if you say "A good optical display" ?



No, it doesn't.

MickeyTong
05-06-2008, 11:49
No, it doesn't.
It may look better, though.

MissAnnElk
05-06-2008, 12:57
Adjectives:
Get your glasses at the Optical Department at Sears . . . I have an appointment with the optician.

Optical illusion . . .

Nouns:
Lots of scientific terms (ray optics, geometric optics . . . expressions the lay audience will never hear).

Adverbs:
Optically distorted . . .

Bels
05-06-2008, 23:32
After a lot of hassle, because I'm lousy on computers, I have now at last got an avater of my choice, and boy most of them were refused, but at at last one came through.. So I am going t accept this one as my avater as fate, although the picture was not my first choice. But yes it's all about this bear. Do you know about him, because if you don't, you soon will, as he is the most famous bear in the world.Or he will be, as this bear is an illegal immigrant, suddenly arriving to Paddington station in England from Peru. And arriving at Paddington station he needs to find a nice English family, who will take care of him. And he finds that family, at Paddington station, and the adventures continue from then.

his is now my avater, as the writer I have found him fantastic and very humorous, and my 2 year old son loves him also. My mother sent him a card-board bookcase of all his stories, and he loves them. especially when Paddington bear has to pronounce that he wants a "Tooty Fruitie ice-cream. Say tooty fruity ice cream and will have this ice-crea. e eventually has this ice-craeam after several attempts of pronouncing it.

These books are great for young childrens literature and it also has the the humour of which adults can appreciate, and I think that's why Paddington bear will be the next great success , after Harry Potte. Watch out!!! e's on his way!! and I do believe he was re- awakened by the marmite advert. But that's the way it goes here. Now becoming the most famous bear, due to Marmite.

Do any of you know what I am talking about :)

Bels
06-06-2008, 00:15
This is the naxt wrong sentence;please correct it. Non native speakers only.

Padddington bear decided to go outside, but discovered it rained, and he decided to stay inside.

Can you correct it and discuss why it is wrong.

alterego
06-06-2008, 08:24
After a lot of hassle, because I'm lousy . . . But yes it's all about this bear. Do you know about him, because if you don't, you soon will, as he is the most famous bear in the world.Or he will be, as this bear is an illegal immigrant, suddenly arriving to Paddington station :)

'Arriving to'??
Do you have any idea how much time I spend trying to correct this mistake in Russian speakers?

I usually just ignore your poorly written posts but I was stunned last week when a student tried to justify his mistake by referencing one of your posts.

Your lucky your clients don't speak English or you'd be out of business.
(yes I see the paradox in my statement but I doubt you do)

Gypsy
06-06-2008, 10:27
After a lot of hassle, because I'm lousy on computers, I have now at last got an avater of my choice, and boy most of them were refused, but at at last one came through.. So I am going t[accept this one as my avater as fate, although the picture was not my first choice. But yes it's all about this bear. Do you know about him, because if you don't, you soon will, as he is the most famous bear in the world.Or he will be, as this bear is an illegal immigrant, suddenly arriving to Paddington station in England from Peru. And arriving at Paddington station he needs to find a nice English family, who will take care of him. And he finds that family, at Paddington station, and the adventures continue from then.

These books are great for young children's literature and it (they;plural) also has (have) the the humour of(no "of" needed in English) which adults can appreciate, and I think that's why Paddington bear (Bear)will be the next great success , after Harry Potte.

Perhaps if you wrote in English, in sentences, we would. That last sentence has 5 major errors in it.

Let's put your 1st paragraph into English in case any non-english speakers attempt to copy it.

After a lot of hassle, because I'm lousy on computers, I have now, at last, got an avatar of my choice. Most of them were refused, but at at last one came through..(you should really say who refused them,we will assume Admins on expat.ru did this). So I am going to accept this one as my avatar as fate, although the picture was not my first choice. (No,I cannot turn this into English. Did you mean avatar of fate?) But, yes, it's all about this bear. Do you know about him? If you don't, you soon will, as he is the most famous bear in the world. (If you separate the question from the contention it is much easier to understand. And even in your language I'm sure a sentence posing a question needs a question mark at the end.) Or he will be, as this bear is an illegal immigrant, suddenly arriving at Paddington station in England from Peru. ( I have left this, apart from correcting the "to" to "at". But the sentence is nonsense. You are actually saying that he is famous BECAUSE he suddenly arrived at Paddington Station from Peru, which I doubt is true.) Arriving at Paddington Station he needs to find a nice English family who will take care of him. He finds that family at the station, and the adventures continue from there. (You have too many Paddington Stations so it reads badly.Please note the corrections to punctuation; you put commas where they have no place and fail to put them where they are needed. The adventures continue from there because you noted the place not the time.)

DJ Biscuit
06-06-2008, 10:38
Your lucky your clients don't speak English or you'd be out of business.
(yes I see the paradox in my statement but I doubt you do)


There's a mistake in your statement which I am hoping is deliberate. :)

xSnoofovich
06-06-2008, 11:04
But that's the way it goes here. Now becoming the most famous bear, due to Marmite.

Do any of you know what I am talking about :)

I do not. But I do have a few questions.

1. What about Mischa? The 1980 Russian Olympic mascot? He is still pretty popular.

2. What about Winnie the Pooh? Mr. Pooh has several movies, as well as a saturday morning cartoon show.

3. So - Is Mr. Paddington more famous than these two other bears?

Gypsy
06-06-2008, 11:37
I do not. But I do have a few questions.

1. What about Mischa? The 1980 Russian Olympic mascot? He is still pretty popular.

2. What about Winnie the Pooh? Mr. Pooh has several movies, as well as a saturday morning cartoon show.

3. So - Is Mr. Paddington more famous than these two other bears?

No.Pooh is very much more popular worldwide than Paddington, whose appeal is peculiarly English.

Pooh,The Bear of Very Little Brain, rocks, he is Elvis. Paddington is more Cliff Richard.

Besides Paddington is written for children, Pooh is for adults.

alterego
06-06-2008, 12:16
There's a mistake in your statement which I am hoping is deliberate. :)

I don't claim to be perfect but I do see a significant difference between your/you're and arrive to/arrive at. All the same it doesn't do my position any good.

And I also realize that it wasn't a paradox but I couldn't be bothered to find a more suitable word.

DJ Biscuit
06-06-2008, 12:24
No I think it was a paradox, and most certainly it was ironic.

Gypsy
06-06-2008, 12:30
It was a paradox.

Bels
06-06-2008, 22:19
Read and watch how it all started of how Paddington Bear is becoming the most famous bear yet again. Watch the youtube and enjoy. Will Paddington Bear enjoy Marmite rather than his favourite marmalade?

YouTube- Paddington Bear Loves Marmite

And here's the argument:


Independent.co.uk
Paddington Bear 'compromised by Marmite ad'

By Amol Rajan
Thursday, 20 September 2007


His marmalade sandwich has always seemed every bit as definitive as the blue duffel coat, battered suitcase, and impeccable manners. But now Paddington Bear's decision to try Marmite in a television advert has prompted his creator to defend himself from the accusation that he is selling out.

Michael Bond has responded to criticism that he compromised Paddington Bear's reputation by allowing his creature to be used for the commercial purposes of Marmite, ditching his beloved marmalade in the process. Bond has revealed that he wasn't consulted on the decision to allow Paddington to try Marmite. He said he wanted to quell "an ill-founded rumour doing the rounds that I was responsible for the script of a television commercial featuring Paddington Bear testing a Marmite sandwich, adding that one of the reasons may have been that Marmite paid me a truly vast sum of money".

"I should be so lucky – particularly since I didn't write it", he said in a letter to The Times, adding: "I have to report that although Paddington found the sandwich interesting, bears are creatures of habit. It would require a good deal more than the combined current withdrawals from Northern Rock to wean him off marmalade, if then."

In the television advertisement, Paddington pulls out one of his traditional marmalade sandwiches. Before taking his first bite, he thinks aloud "maybe I ought to try something different". A double-decker Routemaster bus with an advertisement for Squeezy Marmite drives by, and Paddington is convinced he should try it. In the next shot, he is seen squeezing Marmite on to his bread, before taking a bite and saying: "Mmm ... really rather good."

Paddington & Company, which owns the rights to Paddington's image, was paid an undisclosed sum by the multinational food group Unilever for the advertisement. Paddington & Company's managing director is Karen Jankel, Mr Bond's daughter.

So does Paddington's new-found fondness for Marmite suggest that father and daughter aren't on speaking terms? Not according to Ms Jankel. "We haven't fallen out. Our relationship is strong enough to rise above this," she said. "My father was upset about this because from his point of view, as the creator of Paddington, this rather goes against the grain. It was my decision to let Paddington eat Marmite and I believe this is a good association for him to have. Paddington Bear and Marmite are two great British institutions, and it's great that they should flourish together."

Jankel said she did not regret allowing Unilever to use the Paddington Bear brand. "The point is that as Paddington sees it, Marmite is not a substitute for marmalade – it's just something he tries, and likes," she said. "But the response has been staggering, and speaks volumes about his enduring appeal. Many people have a very strong and nostalgic attachment to Paddington Bear, and there was genuine concern that he'd changed fundamentally. Yet I simply don't believe that he's sold out."

Speaking on Radio 4's Today programme, Mr Bond said: "It wasn't until the point of no return that I got to hear about it." He also said he doubted that his creation would really want to switch to Marmite from marmalade in any case. "He would never convert," Bond said. "The thing about children's characters is these things are set in stone."

Paddington Bear first appeared in the book A Bear Called Paddington in 1958, and has been in 10 books since. Originating in Darkest Peru, the character quickly became the star of a hit animated series in the Eighties, narrated by Michael Hordern.

The author is sceptical about whether Paddington will favour marmalade over Marmite permanently. "Squeezy Marmite may spread well," he said, "but it doesn't have any chunks."

Bels
06-06-2008, 22:20
Read and watch how it all started of how Paddington Bear is becoming the most famous bear yet again. Watch the youtube and enjoy. Will Paddington Bear enjoy Marmite rather than his favourite marmalade?

YouTube- Paddington Bear Loves Marmite

And here's the argument:


Independent.co.uk
Paddington Bear 'compromised by Marmite ad'




His marmalade sandwich has always seemed every bit as definitive as the blue duffel coat, battered suitcase, and impeccable manners. But now Paddington Bear's decision to try Marmite in a television advert has prompted his creator to defend himself from the accusation that he is selling out.

Michael Bond has responded to criticism that he compromised Paddington Bear's reputation by allowing his creature to be used for the commercial purposes of Marmite, ditching his beloved marmalade in the process. Bond has revealed that he wasn't consulted on the decision to allow Paddington to try Marmite. He said he wanted to quell "an ill-founded rumour doing the rounds that I was responsible for the script of a television commercial featuring Paddington Bear testing a Marmite sandwich, adding that one of the reasons may have been that Marmite paid me a truly vast sum of money".

"I should be so lucky – particularly since I didn't write it", he said in a letter to The Times, adding: "I have to report that although Paddington found the sandwich interesting, bears are creatures of habit. It would require a good deal more than the combined current withdrawals from Northern Rock to wean him off marmalade, if then."

In the television advertisement, Paddington pulls out one of his traditional marmalade sandwiches. Before taking his first bite, he thinks aloud "maybe I ought to try something different". A double-decker Routemaster bus with an advertisement for Squeezy Marmite drives by, and Paddington is convinced he should try it. In the next shot, he is seen squeezing Marmite on to his bread, before taking a bite and saying: "Mmm ... really rather good."

Paddington & Company, which owns the rights to Paddington's image, was paid an undisclosed sum by the multinational food group Unilever for the advertisement. Paddington & Company's managing director is Karen Jankel, Mr Bond's daughter.

So does Paddington's new-found fondness for Marmite suggest that father and daughter aren't on speaking terms? Not according to Ms Jankel. "We haven't fallen out. Our relationship is strong enough to rise above this," she said. "My father was upset about this because from his point of view, as the creator of Paddington, this rather goes against the grain. It was my decision to let Paddington eat Marmite and I believe this is a good association for him to have. Paddington Bear and Marmite are two great British institutions, and it's great that they should flourish together."

Jankel said she did not regret allowing Unilever to use the Paddington Bear brand. "The point is that as Paddington sees it, Marmite is not a substitute for marmalade – it's just something he tries, and likes," she said. "But the response has been staggering, and speaks volumes about his enduring appeal. Many people have a very strong and nostalgic attachment to Paddington Bear, and there was genuine concern that he'd changed fundamentally. Yet I simply don't believe that he's sold out."

Speaking on Radio 4's Today programme, Mr Bond said: "It wasn't until the point of no return that I got to hear about it." He also said he doubted that his creation would really want to switch to Marmite from marmalade in any case. "He would never convert," Bond said. "The thing about children's characters is these things are set in stone."

Paddington Bear first appeared in the book A Bear Called Paddington in 1958, and has been in 10 books since. Originating in Darkest Peru, the character quickly became the star of a hit animated series in the Eighties, narrated by Michael Hordern.

The author is sceptical about whether Paddington will favour marmalade over Marmite permanently. "Squeezy Marmite may spread well," he said, "but it doesn't have any chunks."

Bels
06-06-2008, 22:45
No.Pooh is very much more popular worldwide than Paddington, whose appeal is peculiarly English.

Pooh,The Bear of Very Little Brain, rocks, he is Elvis. Paddington is more Cliff Richard.

Besides Paddington is written for children, Pooh is for adults.


Both bears were Originally written by English writers, and the original stories and cartoons will remain the best and most authentic.

Another reason why Paddington Bear is about to be the most famous bear, is that there is a movie on the way, and the producer of the Paddington Bear Movie will be the producer of Harry Potter.

There has also been a new publication of books published, of which Paddington Bear will be questioned by The Police about being an illegal immigrant coming from The Darkest of Peru. Those publications have already been claimed to be published as books, in more languages than any other bear publications :)

I'm sorry if you don't like my style of writing here, but I'm afraid I'm doing better than all of you :) as you are all making mistakes, whilst trying to criticise me, and if you are trying to criticise me, please ensure you correct where the true mistakes are!!. Because you are all making a complete hash of it all.

Boy!! Alterego. I'm so happy you are not correcting my students. Perhaps you are reading the publications from the Russian school state exams too much!!! Because believe me!! I've never seen such a dreadful form of English written by Russians!! And those exams are now doing my teenage heads in !! The books are driving them crazy!!!

Bels
06-06-2008, 23:07
Paddington Bear's 50th Anniversary:

50 Years (http://www.paddington50th.com/)

Paddingto Bear, the next big movie star:

BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Paddington heads for big screen (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6994531.stm)

:10806:

Bels
07-06-2008, 00:02
Where does Pooh bear come from?

He comes from England of course, so he is Sir Cliff Richard 1st and Sir Clliff Richard the 2nd, if referring to the Gypsy.

And I do believe that the TV narrator for the TV serious of Paddington Bear is also a Sir.

Winnie-the-Pooh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winnie-the-Pooh)

:fridaysign:

anthonycasey
07-06-2008, 03:14
Extremely interesting thread. I've noticed that all my trainees are making the same mistakes, so have now made a deal to write the 'official' company guide to English for journalists. Keep the examples coming!

anthonycasey
07-06-2008, 03:17
'Arriving to'??
Do you have any idea how much time I spend trying to correct this mistake in Russian speakers?

I usually just ignore your poorly written posts but I was stunned last week when a student tried to justify his mistake by referencing one of your posts.

Your lucky your clients don't speak English or you'd be out of business.
(yes I see the paradox in my statement but I doubt you do)
Not wishing to start a fight, but it's 'You're lucky your clients'...

anthonycasey
07-06-2008, 03:25
We, Americans, did a pretty good job, as we don't speak British English ;)
In fact, we speak a purer, more advanced form of English.




Well, they are in the UK anyways. ;)
Ooh. Okay. More advanced form of English... as in more phonetic? That's a step backwards, mook! :)

anthonycasey
07-06-2008, 03:34
Bels, what does Cambridge dictionary say about inflammable and flammable?
Take Cambridge. Create bonfire. Insert. Chambers is the one. Or the Guardian Style Guide, if you're feeling rebellious. I quote:
Goths (UC): Germanic tribe that invaded the Roman empire
goths
(LC) Sisters of Mercy fans who invaded the Shepherd's Bush Empire

anthonycasey
07-06-2008, 03:39
I advise you to eat something now in case there isn’t any food when we get there.
After in case use the present simple tense for future reference. Not shall will + verb:
Take an umbrella in case it rains.

Expounding the above case for non-native speakers:

As long as you remember the rule that in conditional and time clauses the future tense is never used (which refers to all prepositions introducing time/condition clauses) you will be safe with the present tense in reference to present/future events.
take an umbrella in case the rain does reach us... in response to statement 'I don't need an umbrella, that storm is never going to get this far west.'

anthonycasey
07-06-2008, 03:42
Is what exactly? What is it? This is not actually a sentence in english. It needs a verb. The first letter of the first word of a sentence should be a capital. I think participle is usually spelled with a "c" not a "v".
A sentence needs a verb? Really? :)

anthonycasey
07-06-2008, 03:55
I repeat:

Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please.


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.[/QUOTE]
The problem (and beauty) of English is this:
He had a clean-shaved face could be:
He had a clean-shaven face, OR, he had a clean, shaved face (trust me, the adverb can be used in absence of the verb to describe a state of being)
This morning I went for shopping dcould be:
This morning I went shopping, OR, this morning I went out for the shopping, OR this morning I went out to get the shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war could be:
She spoke, very shortly, about how they lived during the war (describing how she spoke) OR She spoke briefly about how they lived during the war (describing the content of her speech).
Most of all, it's to do with the ideogram; ever got drunk with someone with whom you share about three words, yet managed to see dawn arrive? Language is for communication, if communication happens, language works :)

Gypsy
07-06-2008, 10:42
Both bears were Originally written by English writers, and the original stories and cartoons will remain the best and most authentic.

Another reason why Paddington Bear is about to be the most famous bear, is that there is a movie on the way, and the producer of the Paddington Bear Movie will be the producer of Harry Potter.

There has also been a new publication of books published, of which Paddington Bear will be questioned by The Police about being an illegal immigrant coming from The Darkest of Peru. Those publications have already been claimed to be published as books, in more languages than any other bear publications :)

I'm sorry if you don't like my style of writing here, but I'm afraid I'm doing better than all of you :) as you are all making mistakes, whilst trying to criticise me, and if you are trying to criticise me, please ensure you correct where the true mistakes are!!. Because you are all making a complete hash of it all.

Boy!! Alterego. I'm so happy you are not correcting my students. Perhaps you are reading the publications from the Russian school state exams too much!!! Because believe me!! I've never seen such a dreadful form of English written by Russians!! And those exams are now doing my teenage heads in !! The books are driving them crazy!!!
Ok put up or shut up. Show me where my corrections are false. Are you really saying that the garbage you posted that I corrected was correct?

See the 1st para above in bold. Whatever else it is, it is not english.

You have a nerve insulting Alterego, his written english is far, far better than anything you have posted here.

Bels
07-06-2008, 23:25
Ok put up or shut up. Show me where my corrections are false. Are you really saying that the garbage you posted that I corrected was correct?

See the 1st para above in bold. Whatever else it is, it is not english.

You have a nerve insulting Alterego, his written english is far, far better than anything you have posted here.

Why don't you PISS OFF!!! And get off my thread. And I won't lower myself to your low lousy level, by correcting your mistakes, or correcting you wasting your time correcting people. Do yourself a favour and Buzz off!!

You are not doing anybody any good, you are a parasite!! Get off my thread!!
In fact you are now on my ignored list!! And Boy!! I wish I could do a helluva lot more!!!

Bels
08-06-2008, 00:18
Very interesting :) What you state might be accepted and understood by other native speakers on a casual basis in the UK as casual speech communication, but it doesn't make it right for Russians learning English as a second language, we must go by the book so to speak. He had a clean shaven face for example, of which is present perfect. We have used the past participle with had, it is relevent to the past as it is now. I shaved yesterday at 8am. Present simple: It's over and finished, and not relevent to now.

Yes!! going to the pub. My now Russian wife was horrified that she couldn't understand any of my friends in a pub, they incuded a mixture of Lutonians and cockneys. When they heard her speaking very well, they automatically spoke to her just as if they were speaking to a local Brit, and she was lost.
She just couldn't understand why they couldn't speak clearly in proper grammar. Of course it was late in the pub at that time, about 10pm, and of course they had a few drinks, and I think a few of them were on drugs.

For EFL students I do suggest that you do learn the English in a proper manner, mixed with some common phrases, and as you advance, learn to enjoy English literature of your choice and whatas to what you enjoy, and you really must watch movies and telivision programmes in American and Brlitish English when you can.

If you can experience working or studying in an English speaking country please do so, and If you can work partime whilst studying, such as a pub or a warehouse, or an office, then please do so. Because, you will achieve great benifits from this.

I went out to get the shopping done We must remember that might be spoken, is not necesseraly correct in writing. There is informal speech and formal writing for example. I like to believe that in many cases we can be informal and relaxed in what we write in forums can be relaxing and informal but there are idiots around who do get in our way :(




The problem (and beauty) of English is this:
He had a clean-shaved face could be:
He had a clean-shaven face, OR, he had a clean, shaved face (trust me, the adverb can be used in absence of the verb to describe a state of being)
This morning I went for shopping dcould be:
This morning I went shopping, OR, this morning I went out for the shopping, OR this morning I went out to get the shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war could be:
She spoke, very shortly, about how they lived during the war (describing how she spoke) OR She spoke briefly about how they lived during the war (describing the content of her speech).
Most of all, it's to do with the ideogram; ever got drunk with someone with whom you share about three words, yet managed to see dawn arrive? Language is for communication, if communication happens, language works :)[/QUOTE]

Bels
08-06-2008, 00:45
I'm going to continue " Common Error by EFL students, due to popular demand from this forum and from PM. Although we do have certain parasites.The ones I have thanked are most welcome to continue. And of course EFL students of any level, including Russian English teachers.

Please correct the following mistakes:

We get very boring with the same mistakes.
She soon got bored of talking to him.
I have been born in a town just outside Paris.
The garage has borrowed me another car while mine is being repaired.

Please give the non native English a chance to answer the questions, Natives may comment later. Believe me ! They are common mistakes from EFL students from at least intermediate.

anthonycasey
08-06-2008, 01:53
"We must remember that might be spoken, is not necesseraly correct in writing."
Absolutely spot on, and perhaps the crucial divide between language as speech and language as writing. For example, we would write learned and spelled, but would say learnt and spelt.

xSnoofovich
08-06-2008, 11:13
Great -
Now we have pete and repeat.

Bels
08-06-2008, 12:24
"We must remember that might be spoken, is not necesseraly correct in writing."
Absolutely spot on, and perhaps the crucial divide between language as speech and language as writing. For example, we would write learned and spelled, but would say learnt and spelt.

I hope this was an intentional mistake or trap, as learned, learnt, spelled and spelt are all correct in written form. And all can be used in both past simple and the past participle.

It's more commont to use the irregular form of such verbs in British English. Such as spell spelt spelt; learn learnt learnt;smell smelt smelt; dream dreamt dreamt.

American English would use the regular forms of those verbs.

Bels
08-06-2008, 12:48
While we are on the subject of American and British English, the past participle for get in British English is got. Your English has got much better.

For American English the past participle is gotten. Your English has gotten much better.

Bels
08-06-2008, 13:11
I'm going to continue " Common Error by EFL students, due to popular demand from this forum and from PM. Although we do have certain parasites.The ones I have thanked are most welcome to continue. And of course EFL students of any level, including Russian English teachers.

Please correct the following mistakes:

We get very boring with the same mistakes.
She soon got bored of talking to him.
I have been born in a town just outside Paris.
The garage has borrowed me another car while mine is being repaired.

Please give the non native English a chance to answer the questions, Natives may comment later. Believe me ! They are common mistakes from EFL students from at least intermediate.

And back to the original topic.

anthonycasey
08-06-2008, 15:19
Of course learned/learnt are correct. But learned looks better on the page, and if it looks right it aids fluid understanding and communication.

Bels
08-06-2008, 20:55
Of course learned/learnt are correct. But learned looks better on the page, and if it looks right it aids fluid understanding and communication.

But you are from Birmingham :) And that is not normally British English. British English is learnt, burnt, etc. all irregular verbs. Same as eat ate eaten and read read read (irregular bacause the past simple and the past participle are differently pronounced) Funny enough this kind of area doesn't do my Russian students heads in, it,s other areas such as word order, passives, word order, asking and anwering questions. Teachers!! make them ask, don't allow them to simply answer!!! ASK!! and answer is a good thing to remember. As a beginner I used to lead too much and ask the questions. It's very difficult for them to ask questions fom the top of their heads, but make them do it. I lead too much in many aspects, but I continue to learn myself as a teacher.

Bels
08-06-2008, 21:06
Another one:

It is a month ago since I left Britain.

Correct it please :)

Bels
08-06-2008, 21:17
Another good mistake: :) age: PLEASE CORRECT.

I'm writing in reply to your letter that I've received two days ago.

I think this is a difficult one, and the explaining of it might be more difficult for a teacher. All commendations for those who can answer and explain why ""

chertovka
09-06-2008, 09:40
Another good mistake: :) age: PLEASE CORRECT.

I'm writing in reply to your letter that I've received two days ago.

I think this is a difficult one, and the explaining of it might be more difficult for a teacher. All commendations for those who can answer and explain why ""
I'm writing in reply to your letter that I received two days ago.

Present Perfect is not used with specific adverbial modifiers of time, like yesterday, two days ago etc. (Gosh, can't believe how much German is getting in the way - spelt Perfekt initially!)

Gypsy
09-06-2008, 10:38
These books are great for young childrens literature and it also has the the humour of which adults can appreciate, and I think that's why Paddington bear will be the next great success , after Harry Potte.

NandM
09-06-2008, 14:05
Another good mistake: :) age: PLEASE CORRECT.

I'm writing in reply to your letter that I've received two days ago.

I think this is a difficult one, and the explaining of it might be more difficult for a teacher. All commendations for those who can answer and explain why ""

Agree with Chertovka
I am writing in reply to your letter that I received two days ago. (Two days ago -modifier of time -we should use past indefinite tense and not present perfect )

Bels
12-06-2008, 16:01
Agree with Chertovka
I am writing in reply to your letter that I received two days ago. (Two days ago -modifier of time -we should use past indefinite tense and not present perfect )

Correct: The present perfect tense is not used with words showing past time such as yesterday, last week, a year ago.

Bels
12-06-2008, 16:06
Another one:

It is a month ago since I left Britain.

Correct it please :)

The answer: It is a month since I left Germany.

Do not use ago before since.

kirk10071
12-06-2008, 16:12
The answer: It is a month since I left Germany.

Do not use ago before since.

I think it is better to say "It has been a month since I left Germany." If I say "It is a month since" I would consider it to be a mistake.

Bels
12-06-2008, 16:29
I think it is better to say "It has been a month since I left Germany." If I say "It is a month since" I would consider it to be a mistake.

Not from my Longman's reference books, and both sentences would be considered correct. Different use of tense, that's all.

Malypense
12-06-2008, 20:22
But you are from Birmingham :) And that is not normally British English. I don't really understand this, if not British English then what is it? (Unless you're joking)


Same as eat ate eaten and read read read (irregular bacause the past simple and the past participle are differently pronounced) They are not irregular because they are pronounced differently (not "differently pronounced") but because they don't follow the regular form, otherwise they would be:
eat, eated, eaten
read, readed, readen

Sorry to contradict you Bels but you aren't correct here and it must be confusing for students of English to read conflicting information.

I'm glad you pointed out that as a teacher you are always learning, I hope I've helped you along the path. Keep up the good work.

Bels
12-06-2008, 22:34
I don't really understand this, if not British English then what is it? (Unless you're joking)

They are not irregular because they are pronounced differently (not "differently pronounced") but because they don't follow the regular form, otherwise they would be:
eat, eated, eaten
read, readed, readen

Sorry to contradict you Bels but you aren't correct here and it must be confusing for students of English to read conflicting information.

I'm glad you pointed out that as a teacher you are always learning, I hope I've helped you along the path. Keep up the good work.

Sorry, but you do have me baffled. I'm sticking to what is formally recocnised by all teachers. You are messing things up.

read, read , read is commonly classified as irregular.
eat, ate, eaten is irregular. if I stated differently, but I dont think so, then I made a mistake. Because the verbs are clearly irregular.

I think Russian students understand my language, because that's the business I am in.

Real regular vebs end in ed walk, walked, talk, talked, watch, watched, but not run , ran.

Now I hope this helps !!!!!

Malypense
12-06-2008, 22:38
Please read what I wrote, I wasn't disputing that they were irregular, but you said they were irregular because they were 'differently pronounced'[sic] that isn't the case.

Gu12_1267
13-06-2008, 00:05
1:Some tribes have always fighted to preserve their own culture.
2;We broke down the door and found Mrs Brook laying on the carpet
3: I refused to let him to help me.

1. Some bribes have been always fighted to preserve their own culture.
2. We have broke down the door and found Mrs Brook laying .....
3. I refused him to let me help.

alterego
13-06-2008, 07:43
I don't really understand this, if not British English then what is it? (Unless you're joking)

They are not irregular because they are pronounced differently (not "differently pronounced") but because they don't follow the regular form, otherwise they would be:
eat, eated, eaten
read, readed, readen

Sorry to contradict you Bels but you aren't correct here and it must be confusing for students of English to read conflicting information.

I'm glad you pointed out that as a teacher you are always learning, I hope I've helped you along the path. Keep up the good work.

So do you consider 'pay' to be a regular or irregular verb?

Bels
13-06-2008, 12:25
Simply look at the back of a good grammar book or dictionary for a list of irregular verbs. All regular verbs simply end in ed
pay, payed, payed =regular

xSnoofovich
13-06-2008, 13:57
Simply look at the back of a good grammar book or dictionary for a list of irregular verbs. All regular verbs simply end in ed
pay, payed, payed =regular

I never knew payed was a word. I always thought it was "paid".

MissAnnElk
13-06-2008, 14:00
I never knew payed was a word. I always thought it was "paid".

It is "paid."

xSnoofovich
13-06-2008, 14:22
It is "paid."

I looked it up, and payed IS a word !

Past tense and past participle paid or payed (pād) To let out (a line or cable) by slackening.


verb (used with object), payed, pay·ing. Nautical.
to coat or cover (seams, a ship's bottom, etc.) with pitch, tar, or the like.

MissAnnElk
13-06-2008, 14:48
I looked it up, and payed IS a word !

Past tense and past participle paid or payed (pād) To let out (a line or cable) by slackening.


verb (used with object), payed, pay·ing. Nautical.
to coat or cover (seams, a ship's bottom, etc.) with pitch, tar, or the like.

Well, there you go! You learn something new every day. Thanks.

I would say "paying," as in "Put away your wallet; I'm paying for dinner." But I didn't know the nautical term. . . Ahoy! :floating:

kirk10071
13-06-2008, 16:31
It is still a regular verb, albeit with a spelling variation. Regular (or "weak") verbs in English use the same to form the past participle and the preterit ending. I paid, I have paid. I walked, I have walked. The strong verbs, which were considered regular but strong in Middle English are now consider irregular. Thus, it is still a weak verb, but if the spelling makes it "different"
I can see why it would be classified as "irregular" in some books.

Bels
13-06-2008, 19:38
It is still a regular verb, albeit with a spelling variation. Regular (or "weak") verbs in English use the same to form the past participle and the preterit ending. I paid, I have paid. I walked, I have walked. The strong verbs, which were considered regular but strong in Middle English are now consider irregular. Thus, it is still a weak verb, but if the spelling makes it "different"
I can see why it would be classified as "irregular" in some books.the

Where'h the real Kirk without the numbers :) Of whom I much admire for his intellect :)

All regular verbs end in ed How many times do I need to state this. And how many times do I need to state that the irregular verbs are listed in good dictionaries, and good grammar books. Students should memorise those irregular verbs from elemantary level. The may well not understand the use of the past participle at the elemantary stage, but they do have a need to remember the irregular and regular verbs in both forms.

Yes I messed around, it is pay, paid, paid. and it is irregular. And yes !! as some of you might know that a great deal of my life was in the Merchant Navy, and I am aware of nautical terminology.

A question!! What is post, starboard, bulkhead, and The Bosun's Chair??? And that's for starters

MissAnnElk
13-06-2008, 19:47
A question!! What is post, starboard, bulkhead, and The Bosun's Chair??? And that's for starters

Port is LEFT (both words have 4 letters).

Starboard is RIGHT.

alterego
13-06-2008, 20:16
The reason I brought it up was because I consider it regular for pronunciation and irregular for spelling.

I'm surprised that someone realized that there is another word 'pay' which is regular for both pronunciation and spelling.

'Lay' works the same way.
Anymore?

If you examine 'learnt' you may find another argument for it being regular.
Anyone see it?

Bels
13-06-2008, 21:48
Port is LEFT (both words have 4 letters).

Starboard is RIGHT.

And how I was taught as a 16 year old to remember the difference. port having the same number of letters as left. Pretty good :) Starboard is the right hand side of a ship, as it has more letters.

xSnoofovich
13-06-2008, 21:53
And how many times do I need to state that the irregular verbs are listed in good dictionaries, and good grammar books.

That is so correct ! One time, when I was learning English, I bought a bad dictionary, and the irregular verbs were * NOT * listed !

I felt so cheated ! and when I went to get my money back, they just laughed at me !!!

Bels
13-06-2008, 22:08
That is so correct ! One time, when I was learning English, I bought a bad dictionary, and the irregular verbs were * NOT * listed !

I felt so cheated ! and when I went to get my money back, they just laughed at me !!!

And why do you of al people!! Have a need to learn the English language :)

Although I must admit we all need to have reference, even those native to their own languge. Even if it;'s to be very careful in speaking to the public, as we all need to take care at times.

Gu12_1267
17-06-2008, 21:05
Correct the following sentences, non-natives of English only please. Or you will be reported this time :) :rules:


He had a clean-shaved face.
This morning I went for shopping.
She spoke very shortly about how they had lived during the war.

My answers below:

His face was clean- shaved.
This morning I was shopping.
She spoken very shortly about how they had been living during the war.

Bels
20-06-2008, 14:59
These are the answers again:


These are the answers:

He had a clean shaven face
This morning I went shopping
They spoke very briefly about how they had lived during the war.

albina
29-07-2008, 06:17
about non English natives. I get lost with "I have swum the English Channel". I am not sure about past verbs. I DO SAY this board stinks unless one is a geek ! I tried to send a message and it would not go through to NandM . Good evening to you.

Albertina
30-07-2008, 21:53
about non English natives. I get lost with "I have swum the English Channel". I am not sure about past verbs. I DO SAY this board stinks unless one is a geek ! I tried to send a message and it would not go through to NandM . Good evening to you.

Don't sh&"t where you want to eat.
:groan:

J.D.
31-07-2008, 05:42
you can't use past tense verbs, you can't use this board,
what can you do?
I don't think you're going to find life any easier here than in the U.S.

I suppose you can't speak Russian either

Bels
07-08-2008, 21:34
I'm still waiting to find out if Albina is going to give Moscow a visit, and let us know what he thinks after that. Let's not forget that he has never been to Russia, and it's been a long time since his wife has been here, and by the sound of things, she is way out of date for Russia.

Gypsy
07-08-2008, 22:20
I'm still waiting to find out if Albina is going to give Moscow a visit, "visit Moscow"?
and let us know what he thinks after that. Let's not forget that he has never been to Russia, and it's been a long time since his wife has been here, and by the sound of things, she is way out of date for Russia.What does this phrase mean?

Does she wear old clothes?

Is her hairstyle not fashionable?

What is the date for Russia that she is out of?

In the scheme of things a vast improvement on the normal Bels offering, (although the spelling is OK and the punctuation nearly correct), but what does it mean?

Mr.travel
13-09-2010, 12:53
From one of the many Moscow language schools. LOL

Вопрос 45 из 50

Such stupid … we heard that we were shocked.

a) the lie was
b) was the lie
c) be the lie
:10475:

Mr.travel
13-09-2010, 16:09
Вопрос 49 из 50

We couldn’t …how well she managed to get off with the punishment.

a) get over
b) get away
c) get out

Darwin candidate, :focus: