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divudi
12-03-2008, 22:26
Hello to everybody. I am about to relocate to moscow and have to choose a school for my 2 kids as soon as possible. The younger one is 5 and still has got 1 year before the elementary school. The older one is 10 and should start the 5th grade in Sep. I want them both to go to the international school. As for the younger 1 it's not a big deal as we still have 1 year but would like him to go to a nursary that makes part of the int'l school so that he could get ready for the 1st grade. The 10 year old is having english lessons but his knowledge is elementary and definitely not enough for studying in english. I know that russian shool could be easier for him/us as the two languages are similar but my priority is the english language.

I would appreciate some suggestions/own experiences of those who have dealt with the same situation.

I have already gone thru all what has been written here about inernational schools and out of the "great four" would choose either EIS or ISM.

ISM would definately be better from the logistics point of view (my office is in the central-western part of the city) but their site says -preference to native english speakers.

Bels
13-03-2008, 13:53
I think the five year old has time to get ready, by going to a good language centre for children, or finding your own personal tutor.

Or do what I do, teach them yourself. I have two Russian sons who are being brought up in both languages, English and Russian. One is ten and one is almost two. I have every confidence that both children will cope in ether type of school, Russian or English. And when we all decide to return to the UK they should fit in reasonably well.

I teach groups of children in the oblast, west region of Moscow. If you're interested and it's not too distant for you give me a pm.

Whatever, provided your children have sufficient hours, your children will have enough time to get prepared for the next school season in September 2008..

divudi
13-03-2008, 15:14
Thank you bels, I appreciate that.
For the time being may family is home and should be following me to moscow within Aug, the latest.
First I want to find the school for my older son and then will look for the apartment, possibly within a walking distance from the school. I don't mind if its gonna be EIS and will have to spend more time going to work.

What's your experience, is it better to live in the downtown or close by and spend more time on taking kids to school or to live close to the schools that are uptown?

As for teaching my kids English myself, though my English is far from being sufficient; I could have and should have done better. That' s why I want them to go the english/american shools at any cost. I know we are gonna have hard times in the first months.
What I am affraid of is the fact, that all the schools' sites I have visited on net require a good knowledge of English. Anyway, we still have 5-6 months to improve.

Thanks for feedbakcs

Bels
13-03-2008, 21:03
First of all I can tell by your ability to communicate here, that your English is good enough to teach your children at both levels. It helps first of all to get the right books. Perhaps even a few books on how to help teach your child, most of the English course books have teachers books.

Why not checkout this popular supplier of English courses, of which most EFL teachers and schools use to purchase their student and resource books, and of which I use for my 80 pupils. There's likely to be a supplier in your current country. So make a search.

Longman English Language Teaching Catalogue - Topic Area (http://eltcatalogue.pearsoned-ema.com/TopicArea.asp?TopicAreaID=AA0003)

Longman English Language Teaching Catalogue - Topic Area (http://eltcatalogue.pearsoned-ema.com/TopicArea.asp?TopicAreaID=AA0003)

Infact here is your local distributer, I have found prices to be much better, and a larger coming from the distributer, rather than major bookstores.

Bels
13-03-2008, 21:14
And communicate to your children in English as much as you can at home. No problem with Russian, as that will develop anyway, as that's where they will be living. They say 50/50 in use of both languangage for them to be bi-lingual.

I'm trying very hard to ensure my children will be native speaking level in both languages. Due to the standards of English teaching in Russian, my wife and I intend to place them to avoid the English lessons, if there's an option to take another language, a third language in other words.

I can't help you with the International schools, as I am in a different situation, and for the moment I don't regard them very highly. Well maybe the American International school. My children go to a state school right beside us, and I'm happy with that. I also teach there with my own private classroom.

divudi
14-03-2008, 15:03
thank you bels

Bels
15-03-2008, 00:13
Just click the thanks button on the right hand corner of post, it's easier.

And no problem, as I enjoy in subjects I'm interested in. Hopefully others will contribute on your other questions about where and how to place your children. Because as you know I by now, I go for the Russian educationion, with additional quality tuition in English elsewhere. Read my perevious posts in other threads, I don't go for any of the British International schools, as they are not controlled by any form of authority. And the American one is impossible to get into.

hka
21-03-2008, 23:36
One thing you should consider - at the international (both British and English) school children start Year 1 when they are 5 (it's kindergarten in Europe, but if you're already here your child shouldn't miss out on it, they already start reading and writing in Year 1), and if your older one is in grade 5 back home she/he would already be in year 6 here. Ok, what I'm trying to say here is that if you are definetely going to be here next school year, and if you have made up your mind about the int school, then you would fare much better to put the little one in school instead of kindergarten somewhere else as year 1 is part of the primary programme already.
Both EIS and the International School in Krylatskoe seem to be great, happy schools, with strong teaching stuff, and the parents whose kids are there this year all seem to be very happy.
But you should apply now, both schools will have a waiting list for next year and are making up their class lists soon. My advice is apply to both and then decide when you've been to both in person.
PM me if you want more details, my kids are at one of the above schools.

Bels
22-03-2008, 00:02
One thing you should consider - at the international (both British and English) school children start Year 1 when they are 5 (it's kindergarten in Europe, but if you're already here your child shouldn't miss out on it, they already start reading and writing in Year 1), and if your older one is in grade 5 back home she/he would already be in year 6 here. Ok, what I'm trying to say here is that if you are definetely going to be here next school year, and if you have made up your mind about the int school, then you would fare much better to put the little one in school instead of kindergarten somewhere else as year 1 is part of the primary programme already.
Both EIS and the International School in Krylatskoe seem to be great, happy schools, with strong teaching stuff, and the parents whose kids are there this year all seem to be very happy.
But you should apply now, both schools will have a waiting list for next year and are making up their class lists soon. My advice is apply to both and then decide when you've been to both in person.
PM me if you want more details, my kids are at one of the above schools.

In Europe it's considered primary, not kindergarten (a german word)

The problem is that these international schools are not the best for developing young children from the age of four for the English language.

You need specialists, those who teach English as a second language. Native speaking teachers are the the best, with some assistance from a qualified Russian teacher. Now if you are based in the western region of Moscow, or if you plan to holiday there during the holiday months please pm me.

hka
22-03-2008, 00:52
No, in continental Europe kindergarten (like the sadik here, although I"m no expert on the Russian system) is for three years, from age 3 to 6, and primary school i.e. grade 1 starts at age 6, or in some countries at age 7 (up to the parents if they put kids in school at 6 or 7). You can call it whatever you want to, pre-school, kindergarten etc, it's not the same system as the British one, and there's no formal learning in kindergarten (they start with the alphabet in grade 1 in most countries).
Children do not need any formal ESL/EFL teaching if they start young, just quality input - certainly not under 6, but as they get older they do benefit from some extra, more formal tutoring. And as far as I know they do get it at the international schools here (I have a master's in TEYL from a UK university, and some experience too, by the way so although I'm not claiming to be 100 % right, I do know something about the field).
No system is perfect, no school is perfect. What I think is REALLY important if your children are growing up happy, confident and socially well adjusted people. There are some days I would love to homeschool them (that's a drawback of knowing so much about teaching), but then again, for me the point of school is far beyond subjects and exams and exam results.....
And I would have loved to put them in a Russian school but when you move around so much as an expat, you have to consider the long term benefits. So I did. I don't know where we are going next, but they will always be able to continue their schooling in English. And raising bilingual children is not so evident for all families, especially monolingual ones.

hka
22-03-2008, 00:56
One more thing - at my children's school they have qualified EFL teachers (native Russian) who work hand in hand with the classroom teacher. Some might be teacher's assistants for the younger classes, some might be also teaching Russian for the expat kids. I know at least one of these Russian teachers who is just getting or has got (not sure) her qualification in the UK, also in TEYL.

Bels
22-03-2008, 01:12
Believe me results count. Mne from four, or from eight are speaking clearly and communicating in English. I can honestly state this is not the results coming from many Russian state schools. I can honestly boast results from all my children.As I've doing it for four years now, I can honestly say I've got many now on third level, Cambridge Movers or Pre- intermediate level from pure beginners. They have writing, speaking, reading, and listening skills.

Many have learn to read, write, tell the time, know the seasons, the years, the months , the weeks. before they lesrnt it in Russian. Why? because they don't go formally to to school before the age of six.

hka
22-03-2008, 09:43
Well, yes, I wasn't saying - I hope - that results didn't matter, only that there are a lot of other factors to school that are just as important

And that yes, in Moscow, the international schools are building a good reputation, I know a lot of happy parents and happy children this year ( I talk to a lot of mums in the IWC). At least the International and the English International both seem to be caring places with highly qualified teachers.
And yes, there is always room for improvement, but as long as this is an ongoing process, it must be all right.

And if you've been working with children for years, you must know that there are very few courses/universities in the world that offer special qualifications in TEYL
My own children are not native English speakers, but go to an English school and are quite fluent now but I do a lot of extra work with them at home - and it's still not easy, you can't always see immediate results. I work on one area, their teachers work on others.... there are only so many hours in a day - and in the end it will all come together. We shouldn't forget that it is not only a language that they are learning, but many, many other skills at the same time that might be obvious to us but new info for them

You seem to be very keen Bells, why don't you run some teacher training courses ( I used to do that and it is great fun!)

Bels
22-03-2008, 16:01
I think I'm better of teaching kids, and I gain much more satisfaction on this.

For teacher training, it's very restrictive to do this. I would need to go through some special training myself, and would need the permission of either Cambridge or Trinity. No teacher is intersted in being trained unless they gain an internationally recognised qualification at the end of the training.