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Bels
07-03-2008, 23:14
A Quiz: Please answer American, British English or both

1: Vocabulary 'vacation' - We went on a two week vacation last month.
2: Vocabulary 'rubbish' - Why is there so much rubbish in here?
3: Vocabulary 'rest room' - Excuse me, where is the rest room?
4: Vocabulary 'mean' - She gave him a kiss for his birthday. She's rather mean!
5: Spelling 'programme' - Did you see that new programme last night?
6: Expression with preposition 'plays on' - He plays on a team in town.
7: Vocabulary 'torch' - The lights have gone out. Where is the torch?
8: Vocabulary 'dialling code' - What's the dialling code for this town?
9: Vocabulary 'trunk' - Put your luggage in the trunk.
10: Grammar 'that it be done' - It's very important that it be done.
11: Grammar 'real strange' - He looked at me real strange.
12: Vocabulary 'public toilet' - Excuse me, where is the public toilet?
13: Grammar 'seven hundred and thirty' - eight thousand seven hundred and thirty
14: Vocabulary 'nappy' - Honey, can you change the baby's nappy?
15: Vocabulary 'garbage' - Why is there so much garbage in here?
15: Vocabulary 'area code' - What's the area code for this town? American
16: Vocabulary postcode – What’s your postcode?
17: Spelling 'center' - It's in the town center.
18: Expression with preposition 'live on' - I live on Washington street.
19: Vocabulary 'crossroads' - Take a left at the second crossroads.
20: Vocabulary 'apartment' - I'm staying in an apartment in the city.

MissAnnElk
07-03-2008, 23:42
1: Vocabulary 'vacation' - We went on a two week vacation last month. AMERICAN
2: Vocabulary 'rubbish' - Why is there so much rubbish in here? BRITISH (We say TRASH)
3: Vocabulary 'rest room' - Excuse me, where is the rest room? AMERICAN (We're vague)
4: Vocabulary 'mean' - She gave him a kiss for his birthday. She's rather mean! BRITISH (We say CHEAP)
5: Spelling 'programme' - Did you see that new programme last night? BRITISH
6: Expression with preposition 'plays on' - He plays on a team in town. EITHER? wE SAY IT.
7: Vocabulary 'torch' - The lights have gone out. Where is the torch? BRITISH (We say FLASHLIGHT)
8: Vocabulary 'dialling code' - What's the dialling code for this town? BRITISH (We say AREA CODE)
9: Vocabulary 'trunk' - Put your luggage in the trunk. AMERICAN
10: Grammar 'that it be done' - It's very important that it be done. BRITISH. (I'd say THAT IT GETS DONE)
11: Grammar 'real strange' - He looked at me real strange. EITHER? I'd say it. But it should be STRANGELY
12: Vocabulary 'public toilet' - Excuse me, where is the public toilet? BRITISH. We'd never say TOILET
13: Grammar 'seven hundred and thirty' - eight thousand seven hundred and thirty BRITISH? (I'd say EIGHTY SEVEN THIRTY . . . or at least EIGHTY SEVEN HUNDRED . . . but others may disagree)
14: Vocabulary 'nappy' - Honey, can you change the baby's nappy? BRITISH (It's a DIAPER)
15: Vocabulary 'garbage' - Why is there so much garbage in here? AMERICAN
15: Vocabulary 'area code' - What's the area code for this town? AMERICAN
16: Vocabulary postcode – What’s your postcode? BRITISH (We say ZIPCODE)
17: Spelling 'center' - It's in the town center. AMERICAN
18: Expression with preposition 'live on' - I live on Washington street. EITHER? I'd say it.
19: Vocabulary 'crossroads' - Take a left at the second crossroads. BRITISH (We say INTERSECTION)
20: Vocabulary 'apartment' - I'm staying in an apartment in the city. AMERICAN

But that's just me.

Bels
07-03-2008, 23:57
Very good 96% correct, but I think we'll leavit as I personally think it's argumentative.



Next lot I suggest non-natives have a chance as Ithink it,s easy for natives, either American or British. But annelka made a very good example to start you all off.

May I sugest something more difficult for natives. Give five questions on the difference between Americans and British English in regards to, vocabulary, grammar, or spelling. Noe that gets you thinking doesn't it. :)

20: Vocabulary 'apartment' - I'm staying in an apartment in the city.
21 Expression with preposition 'do over' - Can I do that over?: Vocabulary 'check' - (in a restaurant) Can I have the check?
Q: Word order 'has probably arrived' - He has probably arrived by now. Both
Q: Vocabulary 'attorney' - I called the attorney to get the information.
Q: Vocabulary 'two weeks' - We'll be away for two weeks.
Q: Vocabulary 'stand in line' - We had to stand in line for three hours to get into the concert.
Q: Vocabulary 'intersection' - Take a left at the second intersection.
Q: Grammar 'this' - (on the telephone) Hello, is this Peter?
Q: Spelling 'program' - Did you see that new program last night?
Q: Spelling 'airplane' - He took an airplane to Paris.
Q: Vocabulary 'queue' - We had to queue for three hours to get into the concert.
Q: Vocabulary 'fortnight' - We'll be away for a fortnight.
Q: Expression with preposition 'live in' - I live in Washington street.
Q: Vocabulary 'call collect' - (on the telephone) I'd like to call collect.
Q: Vocabulary 'diaper' - Honey, can you change the baby's diaper?
Q: Grammar 'one's' - One should get to know one's neighbours.
Q: Grammar 'committee meet' - The committee meet tomorrow.
Q: Past participle form - He's gotten more difficult.
Q: Vocabulary 'holiday' - We went on a two week holiday last month.
Q: Grammar 'his' - One should get to know his neighbours.
Q: Spelling 'check' - I wrote a check for the full amount.
Q: Spelling 'tire' - Do you know how to change a tire?
Q: Spelling 'color' - Do you have this shirt in a different color?
Q: Spelling 'centre' - It's in the town centre.
Q: Spelling 'colour' - Have you got this shirt in a different colour?
Q: Spelling 'tyre' - Do you know how to change a tyre?

alterego
08-03-2008, 00:03
got/gotten
don't have/haven't
hospital/the hospital
have/got
at the weekend/ on the weekend

MissAnnElk
08-03-2008, 00:11
While/Whilst

alterego
08-03-2008, 00:14
damn yankee/damn right I'm a yankee

MissAnnElk
08-03-2008, 00:16
And I always got the impression that "bloody" was really bad . . . having something to do with Christ and therefore being sacreligious.

Bels
08-03-2008, 00:16
While/Whilst

Some reference books claim whilst is old fashioned, and I have a lot of them. But I believe it's correct withe correct timing.

Actually is a great word, but don't over use it, it's often used when not necessary.

alterego
08-03-2008, 00:18
Half the Brits I ask say 'bloody' is rather foul and the other half say it's ok.

Bels
08-03-2008, 00:24
And I always got the impression that "bloody" was really bad . . . having something to do with Christ and therefore being sacreligious.

And if your a regualar visiter to southern UK you will find many using to every word of which they cannot express. To many it has no real meaning, and can be negative or positive. Bludy fantastic! That bludy kid of mine! You're bludy good! You're bludy useless.

Gypsy
08-03-2008, 08:11
And I always got the impression that "bloody" was really bad . . . having something to do with Christ and therefore being sacreligious.

It's just used for emphasis nowadays.

DJ Biscuit
08-03-2008, 20:30
Half the Brits I ask say 'bloody' is rather foul and the other half say it's ok.

Interesting, I've never come across someone who finds it offensive.

An old semi-swear word is 'Blimey' an expression of surprise.

It comes from 'god blind me'.

Bels
08-03-2008, 22:22
Interesting, I've never come across someone who finds it offensive.

An old semi-swear word is 'Blimey' an expression of surprise.

It comes from 'god blind me'.

Now we are getting old fashioned, as such as should we bring up

the Naff expressions of "Gee Whiz" or simply. Nobody uses blimey now, same as yanks dont't use GEE. Unfortunately on my checking of the slang dictionary I cut out of at least 50% of it. The British English slang is much more explicit and descriptive than the American language.

Malypense
08-03-2008, 22:57
Now we are getting old fashioned, as such as should we bring up

the Naff expressions of "Gee Whiz" or simply. Nobody uses blimey now, same as yanks dont't use GEE. Unfortunately on my checking of the slang dictionary I cut out of at least 50% of it. The British English slang is much more explicit and descriptive than the American language.

Excuse me if I get this wrong as I'm not quite sure what the first two sentences mean, (looks like you've been enjoying a drink while watching the rugby, hope your team won! ;)) but I must agree with you (if that is what you are saying) that 'blimey' is out of date and only used by a very few people (mainly the upper classes in my experience). One I heard the other week that I thought had gone out with the dinosaurs was 'jeepers', I couldn't believe that anyone ever said that in the first place! I have heard Americans (is it no longer insulting to say 'yanks'?) say 'gee' but again, only in rather exclusive circles.

I'm not sure I'd go so far as to say that British English slang is more descriptive than the American language; that's a difficult one to equate as English is an ever evolving language, wherever it is spoken, but the difference in usage of any language is always an enjoyable subject so thanks for starting this interesting topic.

Bels
08-03-2008, 23:59
That's my point, blimey has only been used to my knowledge in 1930's 1949 movies. And normally used by the lower class. The educated would not lower themselves to an expression of where the could use a more expressive word. I t was simpky for the movies of which foreigners remembered.

Transparent Theatre
09-03-2008, 00:47
Nobody uses blimey now, .

That's not entirely true. I know quite a few people who use it in a self-consciously ironic way... rather like adding the word "Vicar!" after an accidental double-entendre.

"Blimey" turns up a lot in tv drama which goes out before the 9pm "watershed". Since progs like "The Bill" (an ITV cop series of many years standing, and the proving-ground for almost every young male actor in Britain these days) go out before 9pm, they have to rely on a diet of "minced oaths" like "blimey", "ruddy hell", "oh sugar" etc when obviously something else is meant. But the result is that it's heard a lot on TV.

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 03:04
Now we are getting old fashioned, as such as should we bring up.
What does this mean - the sentence is not english.


I t was simpky for the movies of which foreigners remembered.
The "of" is superfluous. ...simply for the movies which foreigners remembered....is correct.
Or you could have said.....of which foreigners have fond memories, for example but NOT..... of which foreigners remembered. That is not english.

Transparent Theatre
09-03-2008, 03:36
Now we are getting old fashioned, as such as should we bring up


1st MATE: Cap'n, Cap'n, I've brought up your lunch!
CAPTAIN (NOEL COWARD): Serves you right for eating it, lad!

boom-CHING!

The old ones are always the best ones...

MickeyTong
09-03-2008, 17:17
write me/write to me

xSnoofovich
09-03-2008, 18:02
same as yanks dont't use GEE........ than the American language.

i say gee, as in "uh, gee, i dont know." and geez - like - "geez, what more do you want from me?"


i do have a question for Bels-

what is this "American language" ? i mean - i can understand that you feel that you want to differeniate between British english/spellings and American, ok - its interesting for 1 or 2 lessons. but - i seriously doubt your students are spending good money to speak "slang" like someone who lacks an education.

most of the students i had were office workers, who wanted to either be able to communicate with people over the phone ( many times with other non-native english speakers ), in person, or to work in an office in an english speaking country.

Natkin
09-03-2008, 18:09
Good point, Snoofovich!

I read the examples of British slang with an interest, because it helped me to understand remarks of my British friends drinking in a bar and discussing a girl passing by. (Yes, you know who you are, be scared now!)

But there is no practical use of slang knowledge in out everyday life, especially in the office. I won`t dare to use any of these phrases when talking business, let my client be British.

DJ Biscuit
09-03-2008, 18:35
Now we are getting old fashioned, as such as should we bring up

the Naff expressions of "Gee Whiz" or simply. Nobody uses blimey now, same as yanks dont't use GEE. Unfortunately on my checking of the slang dictionary I cut out of at least 50% of it. The British English slang is much more explicit and descriptive than the American language.

Indeed it is old fashioned, which is why, in my post I stated it was an OLD swear word.
However, a lot of people I know in London still use this word, be they old or young.

Bels
09-03-2008, 20:51
i say gee, as in "uh, gee, i dont know." and geez - like - "geez, what more do you want from me?"


i do have a question for Bels-

what is this "American language" ? i mean - i can understand that you feel that you want to differeniate between British english/spellings and American, ok - its interesting for 1 or 2 lessons. but - i seriously doubt your students are spending good money to speak "slang" like someone who lacks an education.

most of the students i had were office workers, who wanted to either be able to communicate with people over the phone ( many times with other non-native english speakers ), in person, or to work in an office in an english speaking country.

Let’s talk about the original purpose of this particular thread, and that is to differentiate between the American language and the British language. Not the slang and you may make this argument on my other threads if you wish.

I have stated this many times here as it’s important for students to be aware of both languages, because they must never mix the languages.

And why?, because if they are taking English Exams, they will be penalised for mixing the language, and they will be penalised for doing so.

When writing articles such as sales letters representing their British or American based language it would look rather stupid if you represent a British company using American English, or a mixture of would be even worse. Sometimes the result would be extremely humorous.

The same applies to those students who will eventually develop in doing some translation work for both American companies and British or EU countries in the English language. And what is the most acceptable form of English in Europe or the EU. Do you know, as I do know that there are new regulations being developed in the EU? I don’t know about the rest of Europe.

Of course we Brits or Americans know the difference of sound and communication on the telephone in regards to business. But believe me you sound more impressive if for example you are representing an international company that is British, EU based, or European, they are much more impressed with British English language and sound. The same applies with North American companies.

Of course when teaching EFL, you have to meet the students needs, and that might well be going through a full course of a certain level. Hopefully you have understood those students and placed them for example in the appropriate level, and will meet their requirement. Generally such courses are between 80- 140 hours. Students should not expect fast results if they choose to have one hour a week for example. It may well take them two years pass one level if they do so. Recommended hours for students should be 3 lessons per week with each lesson being at least 1.5 academic hours. Depends on age, as for young children for example 1 academic hour five days a week as their attention span is low after this.

To summarise your question it’s extremely important through whatever EFL course you give your student in the four skills, reading, writing, speaking and listening that you contentiously inform your students of the difference. Even with my children I inform of the differences between biscuit and cookie, sweets with candy.

Now bring up the slang question on the other thread and I will answer. When my wife, who is above advanced level in English, with a degree in linguistics, she was shocked that she could not understand my friends in my local pub. It looks like to be bi-lingual is going to take a lot longer than I thought.. Will I ever be a native speaker, I don’t think so.

Yes she will, a few years resident anywhere in Great Britain will take care of that.

MissAnnElk
09-03-2008, 21:04
Tell your wife that I have had trouble understanding Australians and Scots. I'm better at it now, but I have had some funny moments where I was sure we were speaking completely differetn languages.

I agree about mixing the styles in business. I have to ask for a style sheet in some jobs. The UN, for example, uses a mixture of UK and US English in their printed pieces. Very odd. I think once one is a writing professional, it suffices to ask the client/employer/whatever what style they use. I don't present myself as anything other than an American in my resume/CV and cover letters. I explain that I am aware of the differences in style, and, to the best of my knowledge, it has never prevented me from getting writing/editing jobs. But I am a native speaker.

Judge
09-03-2008, 21:32
i say gee, as in "uh, gee, i dont know." and geez - like - "geez, what more do you want from me?"


i do have a question for Bels-

what is this "American language" ? i mean - i can understand that you feel that you want to differeniate between British english/spellings and American, ok - its interesting for 1 or 2 lessons. but - i seriously doubt your students are spending good money to speak "slang" like someone who lacks an education.



I'm sure bels isn't teaching his student only slang terms.
Mixing up the lesson and throwing in some slang words is ok.
Do you remember when I sat in one of your classes and we spent an hour teaching your students Brit and American slang,the students were open mouthed and writing everything down and asking for more.I also remember some of the students wanting lessons like this all the time,instead of the boring books they were given.

MissAnnElk
09-03-2008, 21:36
I'm sure bels isn't teaching his student only slang terms.
Mixing up the lesson and throwing in some slang words is ok.

When I taught ESL, my approach was that it is important to understand what people say, and that includes slang. However, when you are a non-native speaker, it is always a bit risky to use the slang as it can be loaded with meaning you don't quite understand, be dated, etc.

There is value in teaching it.

Bels
09-03-2008, 21:41
Here are the answers. It's disappointing that some of you second language speakers couldn't handle, you can communicate here well within reaso, but you can't handle the differences. Very easy for such as Annelk. but not so easy for you to tackle. Yes, it's very important to know the differences, and this thread has nothing to do with slang. Even though us natives had a chat about it here.


20: Vocabulary 'apartment' - I'm staying in an apartment in the city. Answer: Both
21 Expression with preposition 'do over' - Can I do that over? American
: Vocabulary 'check' - (in a restaurant) Can I have the check?
Q: Word order 'has probably arrived' - He has probably arrived by now. Both
Q: Vocabulary 'attorney' - I called the attorney to get the information. American
Q: Vocabulary 'two weeks' - We'll be away for two weeks. Both although Brits can also use a fortnight
Q: Vocabulary 'stand in line' - We had to stand in line for three hours to get into the concert American, why.?.
Q: Vocabulary 'intersection' - Take a left at the second intersection. American. It’s a big problem with Americans,even with native Brits asking for directions whether in prepositions or vocabulary.
Q: Grammar 'this' - (on the telephone) Hello, is this Peter? Both, although yo may hear that, it’s here on the phone.
Q: Spelling 'program' - Did you see that new program last night? American in spelling, no doubt about it.
Q: Spelling 'airplane' - He took an airplane to Paris American. American no doubt
Q: Vocabulary 'queue' - We had to queue for three hours to get into the concert. British
Q: Vocabulary 'fortnight' - We'll be away for a fortnight. British
Q: Expression with preposition 'live in' - I live in Washington street. British but I’m not sure, most certainly street is British. Preposition??
Q: Vocabulary 'call collect' - (on the telephone) I'd like to call collect . American
Q: Vocabulary 'diaper' - Honey, can you change the baby's diaper? American no doubt.
Q: Grammar 'one's' - One should get to know one's neighbours. British
Q: Grammar 'committee meet' - The committee meet tomorrow. Difficult one YES :) plural or singular? In this case British I believe, argumentive as it might be both
Q: Past participle form - He's gotten more difficult. Idon;t like it in my language, therefore American.
Q: Vocabulary 'holiday' - We went on a two week holiday last month British.
Q: Grammar 'his' - One should get to know his neighbours . both due to his.
Q: Spelling 'check' - I wrote a check for the full amount. American
Q: Spelling 'tire' - Do you know how to change a tire? American
Q: Spelling 'color' - Do you have this shirt in a different color? American
Q: Spelling 'centre' - It's in the town centre. British
Q: Spelling 'colour' - Have you got this shirt in a different colour? British
Q: Spelling 'tyre' - Do you know how to change a tyre? British

Bels
09-03-2008, 21:47
When I taught ESL, my approach was that it is important to understand what people say, and that includes slang. However, when you are a non-native speaker, it is always a bit risky to use the slang as it can be loaded with meaning you don't quite understand, be dated, etc.

There is value in teaching it.

I totally agree with you, it's important to understand in the envioronment you are in. But don't attempt to use it, as you will mess up. As many have have already looked stupid in their efforts. You can't do it , and just accept it. But you can try and undertand if that's your area where you are going to visit. But please don't use it, as you are sure to look a fool like many members here :)

DJ Biscuit
09-03-2008, 21:49
Q: Expression with preposition 'live in' - I live in Washington street. British but I’m not sure, most certainly street is British.


In Britain it would be 'I live ON Washington Street'.

Bels
09-03-2008, 21:50
Judge here is the real Mckoy, because he's a Brit, but the other attempts? WOW!

MissAnnElk
09-03-2008, 21:52
If you are American and of a certain age, you may remember the Saturday Night Live sketches with Steve Martin and Dan Akroyd where they portray the "two Slovak brothers looking for foxes." I'm sure these exist on You Tube. A prime example of the dangers of using slang in another language. And very funny stuff.

DJ Biscuit
09-03-2008, 21:54
Judge here is the real Mckoy, because he's a Brit, but the other attempts? WOW!

McCoy.

An idiom dating back to around 1900 credited to a boxer called Kid McCoy.

Judge
09-03-2008, 21:58
When I taught ESL, my approach was that it is important to understand what people say, and that includes slang. However, when you are a non-native speaker, it is always a bit risky to use the slang as it can be loaded with meaning you don't quite understand, be dated, etc.

There is value in teaching it.

That's true, understand and explaining the slang terms is the whole point,even knowing the history of the slang words .Idioms are the same,it helps to know the origin of the idiom.

Judge
09-03-2008, 22:04
McCoy.

An idiom dating back to around 1900 credited to a boxer called Kid McCoy.

Didn't that saying come from McCoy's crisps;);)

MissAnnElk
09-03-2008, 22:05
Exactly. Especially in the job I had. We were teaching Survival English to adults. They were not taking exams or writing papers. They were shopping and dealing with organ transplants (it was Pittsburgh) and meeting Americans.

Bels
09-03-2008, 22:13
In Britain it would be 'I live ON Washington Street'.

There you go. one question answered. Do we live in a street or do do we live on top of a street :) American: onBritish: in

Which one makes more common sense :)

DJ Biscuit
09-03-2008, 22:19
I'm English born and bred and would never say ''I live in Oxford Street''. I would say ''I live on Oxford Street''

Other examples: 'Debenhams have opened a new shop on the High Street'. In this case you can alternate 'in' and 'on'.

Bels
09-03-2008, 22:19
Another issue: To Russians. Which sounds easier to the ear. five million, three hundred thousand, three hundred and fifty. Or five million, three hundred thousand, three hundred fifty.?

Which one's British :)

MissAnnElk
09-03-2008, 22:22
I'm English born and bred and would never say ''I live in Oxford Street''. I would say ''I live on Oxford Street''

Other examples: 'Debenhams have opened a new shop on the High Street'. In this case you can alternate 'in' and 'on'.

I would say the same. But I might talk about "in the streets, you hear people say suchandsuch . . ."

The whole "High Street" concept is strictly Britsh, however . . . took me a long time to understand that!

kirk10071
09-03-2008, 22:25
Another issue: To Russians. Which sounds easier to the ear. five million, three hundred thousand, three hundred and fifty. Or five million, three hundred thousand, three hundred fifty.?

Which one's British :)

I am not Russian, so I will let them answer the first part, but in contracts prepared by the big law firms, at least the US-trained lawyers would put it this way: five million three hundred thousand three hundred fifty. No and and no commas. And if it there are numbers like 37, there are hyphens, as follows: two million three hundred thirty-seven thousand one hundred twenty-nine (2,337,129).

Bels
09-03-2008, 22:25
That's true, understand and explaining the slang terms is the whole point,even knowing the history of the slang words .Idioms are the same,it helps to know the origin of the idiom.


Yes this is true, but many of us here are discussing as natives. let's not forget which thread we are in, as there is an ongoing thread discussing slang. But this one is about American and British English, and it's not slang, it's formal.

Unfortunately the ESL students are having problems even this area ???

Bels
09-03-2008, 23:21
I am not Russian, so I will let them answer the first part, but in contracts prepared by the big law firms, at least the US-trained lawyers would put it this way: five million three hundred thousand three hundred fifty. No and and no commas. And if it there are numbers like 37, there are hyphens, as follows: two million three hundred thirty-seven thousand one hundred twenty-nine (2,337,129).

But the Russians do use the and, but not the written commas. For example £9876543213 ? isn,t it easier to read £9,876,543,213 as nine million eight hundred and seventy six thousand million, five hundred and forty three thousand, two hundred and thirteen

?? Wow!! the American version would be answered by please send your numbers by e-mail, as nye panemayo.

Bels
09-03-2008, 23:24
I am not Russian, so I will let them answer the first part, but in contracts prepared by the big law firms, at least the US-trained lawyers would put it this way: five million three hundred thousand three hundred fifty. No and and no commas. And if it there are numbers like 37, there are hyphens, as follows: two million three hundred thirty-seven thousand one hundred twenty-nine (2,337,129).

This topic of differences in American English and British is well discussed in "Market leader Intermediate cousrse books". But not heavy enough I'm afraid. The lesson needs to be expanded.

xSnoofovich
09-03-2008, 23:27
As, i was typing this out - it came to me - why you keep pounding on all of this Brit/Amer stuff -

you mostly teach children - outside of Moscow, but near or in a rich village/area

whereas, i am lead to believe that most of the people here ( at least the ones i know ) teach inside moscow, to mostly businessmen/adults, with one or two children.

However -




When writing articles such as sales letters representing their British or American based language it would look rather stupid if you represent a British company using American English, or a mixture of would be even worse. Sometimes the result would be extremely humorous.

Not really - Ever heard of International companies? My gf works at shell - which, i believe, is dutch, and yet, there are both brits and americans, as well as dutch !




The same applies to those students who will eventually develop in doing some translation work for both American companies and British or EU countries in the English language. And what is the most acceptable form of English in Europe or the EU. Do you know, as I do know that there are new regulations being developed in the EU? I don’t know about the rest of Europe.

uh - do you "teach" translators? i thought thats what universities do





But believe me you sound more impressive if for example you are representing an international company that is British, EU based, or European, they are much more impressed with British English language and sound. The same applies with North American companies.

Not really, have you ever worked in an office? Prestige comes from reputation, not what the other guy/gal sounds like on the phone.





Now bring up the slang question on the other thread and I will answer. When my wife, who is above advanced level in English, with a degree in linguistics, she was shocked that she could not understand my friends in my local pub. It looks like to be bi-lingual is going to take a lot longer than I thought.. Will I ever be a native speaker, I don’t think so.


i doubt i would understand you either - does that make me a non native english speaker?

xSnoofovich
09-03-2008, 23:29
ok - so - for our contracts * in english * they are a mere formality. the emphasis is on the * Russian * contract.

the english version is just to know what the russian version says.

Bels
09-03-2008, 23:30
And please someone don't bring up the billions, it's only an example as a figure of speech to give an example.

xSnoofovich
09-03-2008, 23:32
But the Russians do use the and, but not the written commas. For example £9876543213 ? isn,t it easier to read £9,876,543,213 as nine million eight hundred and seventy six thousand million, five hundred and forty three thousand, two hundred and thirteen

?? Wow!! the American version would be answered by please send your numbers by e-mail, as nye panemayo.

Russians arent as stupid as you think or pretend them to be.

Bels
09-03-2008, 23:36
As, i was typing this out - it came to me - why you keep pounding on all of this Brit/Amer stuff -

you mostly teach children - outside of Moscow, but near or in a rich village/area

whereas, i am lead to believe that most of the people here ( at least the ones i know ) teach inside moscow, to mostly businessmen/adults, with one or two children.

However -



Not really - Ever heard of International companies? My gf works at shell - which, i believe, is dutch, and yet, there are both brits and americans, as well as dutch !



uh - do you "teach" translators? i thought thats what universities do




Not really, have you ever worked in an office? Prestige comes from reputation, not what the other guy/gal sounds like on the phone.





i doubt i would understand you either - does that make me a non native english speaker?

Sorry I don't buy what you say. It's important that students, especially business students are made aware of the differences in both languages. It's final and it's important. What do others, becausebelieve me , it's official and every teacher should recognise this, and so should the student. Otherwise you going to get in a terrible mees eventually.

Bels
09-03-2008, 23:39
I'm English born and bred and would never say ''I live in Oxford Street''. I would say ''I live on Oxford Street''

Other examples: 'Debenhams have opened a new shop on the High Street'. In this case you can alternate 'in' and 'on'.

So am I, and I wouldn't. The grammar is wrong in your case.

Bels
09-03-2008, 23:41
Russians arent as stupid as you think or pretend them to be.

Exactly :) And they use the and. Don't worry,theres a Russian and English linguist right behind me :)

xSnoofovich
09-03-2008, 23:42
So am I, and I wouldn't. The grammar is wrong in your case.

would you be so kind as to post the rules for "in, on, or at" ?

Bels
09-03-2008, 23:58
would you be so kind as to post the rules for "in, on, or at" ?

What's the point, as we all know the prepositions, including those EFL students at intermediate level. Of course it's argumentative with American English or British and I don't care about this particular factor.

The important issue is that we are different, and students should know the differences, fortunately the British course text books now rule in Russia, and that helps a lot.

But going back to street, I live in Brook street, or should it be, I live on Brook street. Now to me the latter seems very strange to me, but perhaps not to the Americans.

For goodness sake, it's only a quiz, and you've been given the correct answers, don't confuse the RUSSIAN STUDENTS.

Gypsy
10-03-2008, 01:01
Sorry I don't buy what you say. It's important that students, especially business students are made aware of the differences in both languages. It's final and it's important. What is final and important? If "differences" then they are plural so should it not be:- They are final and important?
What do others, becausebelieve me , it's official and every teacher should recognise this, and so should the student. Otherwise you going to get in a terrible mees eventually. What on earth is this supposed to mean because it certainly isn't english? "What do others what?" do?think? say? write? There needs to be a verb there.

alterego
10-03-2008, 06:24
Q: Vocabulary 'stand in line' - We had to stand in line for three hours to get into the concert American, why.?.
Why not?

Q: Expression with preposition 'live in' - I live in Washington street. British but I’m not sure, most certainly street is British. Preposition??
American would be “I live on Washington street.” The British do not have a monopoly on the word ‘street’.

Q: Grammar 'one's' - One should get to know one's neighbours. British
Americans would also say this. It sounds a bit formal but not uncommon.

Q: Grammar 'committee meet' - The committee meet tomorrow. Difficult one YES plural or singular? In this case British I believe, argumentive as it might be both
Definitely not American. Committee, CIA, the government, the team, are all viewed as singular. Some overly educated Americans may say ‘the team are’ if they want to emphasize an individual aspect of each member but more likely they will say ‘the team members are . . .”

Q: Past participle form - He's gotten more difficult. Idon;t like it in my language, therefore American.
There are a lot of things I don’t like in my language too but I don’t automatically ascribe them to the British.
Yes, in American English it is get – got – have gotten
When questioned by my British colleagues I love to ask them
“Do you also say forget – forgot – have forgot?”

‘Got’ has multiple meanings. In American English the primary meaning is not possession but acquisition.
Almost . . . almost. . . I got it!
Now I have it. (NOT ‘I have got it.')

Did you get it? (Did you receive it?)
Yes, I got it. (Yes, I received)

If we say “I got two tickets yesterday” that’s fine.
If we say “I got two tickets now” our mothers slap us and say “Don’t say got.”
‘I have got two tickets now’ would sound stranger but equally bad.

The above should not be confused with ‘got to’.

kapione
10-03-2008, 07:27
1: Vocabulary 'vacation' - We went on a two week vacation last month.American
2: Vocabulary 'rubbish' - Why is there so much rubbish in here?we say garbage
3: Vocabulary 'rest room' - Excuse me, where is the rest room?bathroom
4: Vocabulary 'mean' - She gave him a kiss for his birthday. She's rather mean!she is cheap
5: Spelling 'programme' - Did you see that new programme last night?TV show
6: Expression with preposition 'plays on' - He plays on a team in town.
7: Vocabulary 'torch' - The lights have gone out. Where is the torch?Light ,or light bulb burned out
8: Vocabulary 'dialling code' - What's the dialling code for this town?area code
9: Vocabulary 'trunk' - Put your luggage in the trunk.suitcases
10: Grammar 'that it be done' - It's very important that it be done.
11: Grammar 'real strange' - He looked at me real strange.
12: Vocabulary 'public toilet' - Excuse me, where is the public toilet?
13: Grammar 'seven hundred and thirty' - eight thousand seven hundred and thirty 8730 is eightthousandthirty no AND in the alphbetised numbers
14: Vocabulary 'nappy' - Honey, can you change the baby's nappy?diapers /or the disposable one pampers
15: Vocabulary 'garbage' - Why is there so much garbage in here?
15: Vocabulary 'area code' - What's the area code for this town? American
16: Vocabulary postcode – What’s your postcode?
17: Spelling 'center' - It's in the town center.Downtown
18: Expression with preposition 'live on' - I live on Washington street.
19: Vocabulary 'crossroads' - Take a left at the second crossroads.intersection/junction
20: Vocabulary 'apartment' - I'm staying in an apartment in the city.American

kapione
10-03-2008, 07:31
Fun quiz...my students ask me for the explainations of these very common word, they can tell our students/colleagues alot of helpful things ! great work again Bels

Gypsy
10-03-2008, 10:24
Q: Vocabulary 'stand in line' - We had to stand in line for three hours to get into the concert American, why.?.
Why not? Certainly said in every day english (Uk style). I think he might have been trying to use "line" in place of the British "queue", in which case he should have put "a" in front of"line".


Q: Expression with preposition 'live in' - I live in Washington street. British but I’m not sure, most certainly street is British. Preposition??
American would be “I live on Washington street.” The British do not have a monopoly on the word ‘street’.Nor would we claim to. One of the most famous roads in the US is Wall STREET.


Q: Grammar 'one's' - One should get to know one's neighbours. British
Americans would also say this. It sounds a bit formal but not uncommon.

Q: Grammar 'committee meet' - The committee meet tomorrow. Difficult one YES plural or singular? In this case British I believe, argumentive as it might be both
Definitely not American. Committee, CIA, the government, the team, are all viewed as singular. Some overly educated Americans may say ‘the team are’ if they want to emphasize an individual aspect of each member but more likely they will say ‘the team members are . . .” Absolutely correct alterego, committee is singular, one says "a committee", thus it should have read "the committee meets tomorrow."

Basically alterego you are correct.

Malypense
10-03-2008, 11:08
So am I, and I wouldn't. The grammar is wrong in your case.I wouldn't necessarily say he was wrong. It depends on what part of the country you are from. I would use either 'in' or 'on'. English is such a diverse language that there are many differences in usage and it is misleading to say that he is "wrong" in this case. One cannot assume that one's own version of English is always the "correct" version.

Bels
10-03-2008, 11:38
I wouldn't necessarily say he was wrong. It depends on what part of the country you are from. I would use either 'in' or 'on'. English is such a diverse language that there are many differences in usage and it is misleading to say that he is "wrong" in this case. One cannot assume that one's own version of English is always the "correct" version.

I stand corrected, I assumed because he was British that in his case he was wrong. Sometimes prepositions are argumentative.

alterego
10-03-2008, 12:34
I stand corrected, I assumed because he was British that in his case he was wrong. Sometimes prepositions are argumentative.
In American English prepostitions can't be argumentative.

Gypsy
10-03-2008, 12:43
In American English prepostitions can't be argumentative.

Ditto, English, English. How can a preposition be argumentative? Do they get angry?

Do they drink too much, become everybodies' best mate and then start an argument?

"Hello, my name's On, what you lookin' at?" Smack.

We don't know. Sigh.

xSnoofovich
10-03-2008, 12:47
In American English prepostitions can't be argumentative.

Yes, they can. ;)

Bels
10-03-2008, 12:49
Nice simple examples. " I've just found a key". "I've just found the key".
They're playing the piano. They're playing a piano.

alterego
10-03-2008, 13:30
Yes, they can. ;)

Are you being prepositional?

Bels
10-03-2008, 18:20
Well, I'm not proposing anything.

Gypsy
10-03-2008, 19:50
Nice simple examples. " I've just found a key". "I've just found the key".
They're playing the piano. They're playing a piano.
These are the definite and indefinite articles, not prepositions aren't they?

I thought prepositions were words such as, in,on,by, at etc.

Bels
10-03-2008, 20:04
Yes it's an article.

xSnoofovich
11-03-2008, 09:34
Are you being prepositional?


no - but i am trying to article-ate my thoughts on this matter.

Gypsy
11-03-2008, 10:28
no - but i am trying to article-ate my thoughts on this matter.

Are you sure?

Is this definite?

xSnoofovich
11-03-2008, 11:33
Are you sure?

Is this definite?

a - definitely an indefinite article