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IraM
07-03-2008, 22:14
Did funny things happen to you when you used the words with totally different meanings in British and American English? For example, the word ‘fag’ came to my mind… :D

Bels
07-03-2008, 23:08
Yes it's here now, let's have a fag. :) Check out on the next thread. What a coincidence as already prepared.

kirk10071
07-03-2008, 23:15
Did funny things happen to you when you used the words with totally different meanings in British and American English? For example, the word ‘fag’ came to my mind… :D

I had a British friend in America once who was married to an American. His son from his first marriage came to the States to spend the summers, but as he got older, he was bored. One summer, he brought a friend with him. I was visiting and the two British lads were sitting in the kitchen in silence. I asked them if they were ok because they weren't speaking and they said "we're pissed." I thought for weeks they were angry with each other, which was sad since they can come from so far away. Then their father explained that they were just drunk! I had never heard that expression before to mean "drunk." In the US, it only means "angry."

MissAnnElk
07-03-2008, 23:33
There's the classic story of the English exchange student in the US.

The class is having a test, and the exchange student leans over and asks his classmate if he has a rubber.

"Sure," says the American kid. "But why do you want it NOW?!"

alterego
07-03-2008, 23:41
I raised a few eyebrows by using the word 'fanny' before I learned the British definition.

Bels
07-03-2008, 23:41
Nice one , both of you. They're such common expressions. I'm out to get some nappies for my baby.

MissAnnElk
07-03-2008, 23:44
I raised a few eyebrows by using the word 'fanny' before I learned the British definition.

Oh, yeah! The "fanny pack" (in UK "the bum bag"). I have an American friend married to an English guy. He would cringe, visibly, when she said that.

Bels
08-03-2008, 00:02
Oh, yeah! The "fanny pack" (in UK "the bum bag"). I have an American friend married to an English guy. He would cringe, visibly, when she said that.

No, it means something more :) a females vagina, crudel meant. The same as ass we have a word considered cruder word a*se.

Bels
08-03-2008, 00:03
But "Arse about face" is ok.

MissAnnElk
08-03-2008, 00:04
I know! That's why he cringed when she used the term in a different context.

MissAnnElk
08-03-2008, 00:05
Yeah, I never understood the difference between ass/arse and sh*t/sh*te.

alterego
08-03-2008, 00:05
I believe Americans would consider 'arse' and 'shite' to be not so bad whereas 'ass' and 'shit' would definitely be vulgar.

MissAnnElk
08-03-2008, 00:10
I agree . . . but I'm not sure.

Bels
08-03-2008, 00:11
I had a British friend in America once who was married to an American. His son from his first marriage came to the States to spend the summers, but as he got older, he was bored. One summer, he brought a friend with him. I was visiting and the two British lads were sitting in the kitchen in silence. I asked them if they were ok because they weren't speaking and they said "we're pissed." I thought for weeks they were angry with each other, which was sad since they can come from so far away. Then their father explained that they were just drunk! I had never heard that expression before to mean "drunk." In the US, it only means "angry."

To be pissed off with everything or someone would have a similar meaning,

I get pissed off with sal now and again, and I always get pissed off with this berk Gypsy. But to be pissed means extremel drunk.

alterego
08-03-2008, 00:13
It's better to be pissed off than pissed on.

MissAnnElk
08-03-2008, 00:13
To be pissed off with everything or someone would have a similar meaning,

I get pissed off with sal now and again, and I always get pissed off with this berk Gypsy. But to be pissed means extremel drunk.

But my Brit friends talk about the weather: "It was pissing down!" I find that rather crude.

Bels
08-03-2008, 00:28
Nice one, I'm going for a Gypsy, byebye.