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Bels
06-03-2008, 22:59
Here's the beginning of the London s london slang dictionary; You are all welcome to join in and build this dictionary. I'll do my best best to collate. East ender slang is most welcome. By the way this slang could well be spread out through out the South of England.

Soon their will be a quiz, and you will have to explain it in the same manner as what is below.

.
ace - excellent, great.
aggro - short for aggravation or violence, e.g. "He was steaming drunk and well up for some aggro".

banged up - to be put in prison. eg "Did you hear John got banged up for that blag".

bangers - another name for sausages. Originates from the fact that they explode when cooking if they are not pierced first. A traditional English meal is 'bangers and mash' (sausages + mashed potatoes).

barmy - a foolish person, mad. "You must be barmy mate".

bell - a telephone call. eg "give us a bell later"

bent - can mean 'gay man' or 'stolen'. ie "That bloke dahn the market sells bent goods".

bent as a nine* pound/bob note - (* denomination varies widely) a term to describe someone thought to be gay. eg "(H)e's bent as a nine bob note mate" and also used to describe something that is illegal/crooked, ie. stolen goods.

berk - Rhyming Slang, short for 'Berkshire Hunt', meaning 'cunt'. Most people go around calling people 'berks' for years not realising that it is slang for one of the strongest swear words in the English language.

Billy - short for 'Billy Whizz' a character from an English children's comic (the Beano). 'Whizz' is another name for the drug 'speed'. ie. It makes you whizz.

bimbo - a young woman considered sexually attractive but of limited intelligence. From the Italian word for little child / baby.

Mete
06-03-2008, 23:27
Love rhyming slang, though I would not post my favourite ones, as they are well dodgy :mml:

Here are the ones I use the most

to have the butcher's (butcher's hook) = to have a look
north and south - mouth
cheese and kisses- missus
whistle ad flute- suit
Bristols(city)- tits(titty)
Barry White -shite

Bels
06-03-2008, 23:41
Love rhyming slang, though I would not post my favourite ones, as they are well dodgy :mml:

Here are the ones I use the most

to have the butcher's (butcher's hook) = to have a look
north and south - mouth
cheese and kisses- missus
whistle ad flute- suit
Bristols(city)- tits(titty)
Barry White -shite

Wow! Thanks mate, that will confuse the non native speakers. To have the butcher's, Cheese and kisses, yes I'm familiar with. But it looks like us natives are not familiar with them all.

So the quiz will be for all, when it comes. So start getting your books ready non natives of EnglishErrr, would we say make sure you're weariing the whistle and flute at the party ???.

Marina-ballerina
07-03-2008, 01:33
trouble & strife - wife
apple and pears - upstairs

Gypsy
07-03-2008, 02:24
Here's the beginning of the London s london slang dictionary; What is London s london?
You are all welcome to join in and build this dictionary. I'll do my best best to collateit (presumably).
East ender slang is most welcome. No such thing, there is Cockney rhyming slang, or East End slang,never heard of East ender slang though.
By the way this slang could well be spread out through out the South of England. Did you mean "could be spread throughout the south of England?" Your sentence does not make sense.


Soon their THERE
will be a quiz, and you will have to explain it in the same manner as what is below. This is a joke,right? The english is dreadful; "same manner as below" is correct.



ace - excellent, great.
aggro - short for aggravation or violence, e.g. "He was steaming drunk and well up for some aggro".

banged up - to be put in prison. eg "Did you hear John got banged up for that blag".

bangers - another name for sausages. Originates from the fact that they explode when cooking if they are not pierced first. A traditional English meal is 'bangers and mash' (sausages + mashed potatoes).

barmy - a foolish person, mad. "You must be barmy mate".

bell - a telephone call. eg "give us a bell later"

bent - can mean 'gay man' or 'stolen'. ie "That bloke dahn the market sells bent goods".

bent as a nine* pound/bob note - (* denomination varies widely) a term to describe someone thought to be gay. eg "(H)e's bent as a nine bob note mate" and also used to describe something that is illegal/crooked, ie. stolen goods.

berk - Rhyming Slang, short for 'Berkshire Hunt', meaning 'cunt'. Most people go around calling people 'berks' for years not realising that it is slang for one of the strongest swear words in the English language.

Billy - short for 'Billy Whizz' a character from an English children's comic (the Beano). 'Whizz' is another name for the drug 'speed'. ie. It makes you whizz.

bimbo - a young woman considered sexually attractive but of limited intelligence. From the Italian word for little child / baby.
Haven't heard those for 30 odd years and even then they were so old they'd appear on the BBC.

A load of old pony, no one has said Whistle & Flute for 30 odd years, just Whistle, and more recently people may say "Bell me later.", Barmy went out with the war, a whizz is to urinate - "just off for a whizz" or "shake hands with the unemployed."

What is appalling though is that your written english is so absolutely dire.

pjw
07-03-2008, 02:58
What is London s london? it (presumably). No such thing, there is Cockney rhyming slang, or East End slang,never heard of East ender slang though. Did you mean "could be spread throughout the south of England?" Your sentence does not make sense...............english teacher and your written english is absolutely dire.

Ok, donīt touch like the south London man, like, yeah, know what I mean man, yeah? South London is cool man, like, South London is God man. Norwood, Crystal Palace man, Tulse Hill, like up to f...ing Streatham man. Even up to trendy f***ing Clapham man. What you know about SE is like man, you know no think about my sth London man innit though? man, yeah goes through like me man like, you know what I mean man like yah man? Brixton man. Love you man. :rasta:

Gypsy
07-03-2008, 03:38
Ok, donīt touch like the south London man, like, yeah, know what I mean man, yeah? South London is cool man, like, South London is God man. Norwood, Crystal Palace man, Tulse Hill, like up to f...ing Streatham man. Even up to trendy f***ing Clapham man. What you know about SE is like man, you know no think about my sth London man innit though? man, yeah goes through like me man like, you know what I mean man like yah man? Brixton man. Love you man. :rasta:

South of the river? Not at this time of night mate, sorry.

Mete
07-03-2008, 09:37
My favourite one:

Gary (Glitter)- shitter, as in she/he is taking it up the Gary. I put it in both genders trying not to appear sexist.
Is there a continuation of an old brawl between bels and gypsy or it's just me?
Ta

Gypsy
07-03-2008, 10:18
My favourite one:

Gary (Glitter)- shitter, as in she/he is taking it up the Gary. I put it in both genders trying not to appear sexist.
Is there a continuation of an old brawl between bels and gypsy or it's just me?
Ta

Brawl? Perish the thought.

Simply correcting some rather obvious errors in his written english.

I'm sure that, as a teacher of English, he would not wish non English speakers to be misinformed; or confused by the difference between the text books and his own writing.

Bels
07-03-2008, 12:28
gypsy's kiss - Rhyming Slang for 'piss' (urinate). More often shortened to 'gypsy's'. e.g.. "I'm just nipping out for a gypsy's".

Bels
07-03-2008, 12:44
hacked off - fed up, annoyed. A lot of the time prefixed with 'totally'.

keep your hair on - a phrase meaning "keep calm".

keep your pecker up - meaning "stay positive", "look on the bright side" etc.

knackered - exhausted, especially after sex (derived from the word describing an old horse). Sometimes shortened to 'knacked'. Can also be used for something broken.

khazi - lavatory (From the Indian).

leave it out - "stop doing that" or "stop saying that" or as if to say "you must be joking".

luvverly jubberly - a phrase made popular by the TV series 'Only Fools and Horses' meaning that all is well..

Penelope
07-03-2008, 12:59
OMG!!!! I can just imagine some of these peppering the next annual report I look at :eek:

Gypsy
07-03-2008, 13:47
OMG!!!! I can just imagine some of these peppering the next annual report I look at :eek:

Not much chance-they are very old, and are hardly used anymore.

Penelope
07-03-2008, 14:14
Yes, but any Russians looking to improve their slang factor don't always know that. Anyway, non-native speakers often have a difficult time keeping "everyday" language out of their business writing.

Gypsy
07-03-2008, 14:20
Yes, but any Russians looking to improve their slang factor don't always know that. Anyway, non-native speakers often have a difficult time keeping "everyday" language out of their business writing.

My point exactly. What is the point in teaching out of date slang? What if native russian speakers start using this in London - they'll be laughed at. I cannot see how this helps anyone.

Penelope
07-03-2008, 14:55
I guess it would make watching Eastenders easier?

xSnoofovich
07-03-2008, 15:40
What if native russian speakers start using this in London - they'll be laughed at.

what about us americans?

xSnoofovich
07-03-2008, 15:51
we should add * current/up to date * words like-

hommie - friend/guy
homegirl- a girl ( see hommie)
hoochie pop - a dance move for females by thrusting the pelvis region
hoochie - a name to call girls that you don't like - sexually promiscuous
hooch - cheap homemade alcohol
ho - short form of whore


or - some really * cool ones *

be geese - To leave: Yo we be geese, because geese migrate, or travel over long distances.

bent - Drunk. It doesn't matter if I'm dead sober or I'm bent
Sad. You got me bent like elbows, amongst other things
Whipped or in love. Tell me why you just can't take a hint that I'm with someone else that's got me bent.


8 Ball - Old English 800

blunted - Under influence of a blunt

Bling Bling - Jewelry such as chains, watches, bracelets, rings, earrings, etc.

cock diesel - Very muscular.

Gypsy
07-03-2008, 15:56
Much better, although in the UK - to be behind the 8 ball, means to be in a difficult, almost impossible position.

xSnoofovich
07-03-2008, 16:00
brizzles - Women. Broads
Casper - "I'm Casper", I'm out of here, I'm ghost.
Crank - It can mean anything you want it to mean, in any circumstance.

Damn cave bitch tried to Crank me --
That shit was Crank --
That was the Crankest thing ever, it was so tight. --


buck - To threaten by 'jumping' toward a person.

crunk - To have a good time

floss - To show off.

face gator - Well respected. All good

DJ Biscuit
07-03-2008, 16:34
Much of what Bels has written is classic but many are out of date.

What about 'Britneys'?

As in: ''Fancy going for a few Britneys later?''

Britney Spears = Beers.

DJ Biscuit
07-03-2008, 16:35
Or :

''It all went a bit Pete.''

Pete Tong = wrong.

xSnoofovich
07-03-2008, 16:41
Or :



Pete Tong = wrong.

? Is this a common phrase? i always thought he was a great dj, at least the parties i went to where he played were really cool.

DJ Biscuit
07-03-2008, 16:55
It's nothing to do with him per se, it simply ryhmes and he is well known. Nothing to do with him personally.

And yes. it is a very commonly used phrase.

DJ Biscuit
07-03-2008, 17:05
"You're a berk!" (berkshire hunt = c*nt)

DJ Biscuit
07-03-2008, 17:16
Double Bubble = Cocaine.

Gypsy
07-03-2008, 17:38
It's nothing to do with him per se, it simply ryhmes and he is well known. Nothing to do with him personally.

And yes. it is a very commonly used phrase.

Indeed - it has even been used in TV advertising in the UK.

MissAnnElk
07-03-2008, 18:25
I don't suppose these are slang, or if they are even specific to London, but the following are expressions I have picked up from friends or had to ask my British friends about:

More-ish
Pear-shaped (as in "it's all gone pear-shaped.")
Happy as Larry (a Stooges reference?)
Sarnie
Pushchair (thought it meant wheelchair)
Yard (Didn't get why this was not a good thing . . . I grew up with a frontyard and a backyard)

And while I refuse to use the term "brilliant," I have started using "sorted" and "fash" (as in "do not fash yourself). But that's Scottish with French origins, no?

Watching SKY has helped me learn English.

Bels
07-03-2008, 18:32
Slang should never be written formally. It's purpose for non-natives is as a matter of interest, and also for non-natives to understand what has been spoken by natives.

Only an English speaking native can criticise what is dated and what isn't. All of the slang written here has been carefully selected, and is currently in use.

I'm sorry to see that there are a few who don't appreciate my being active here and shadow me with crticism.

Penelope
07-03-2008, 18:34
Gypsy is a native English speaker.

Bels
07-03-2008, 18:36
what about us americans?

Coming soon, but I will need a dictionary :)

Bels
07-03-2008, 18:43
Much of what Bels has written is classic but many are out of date.

What about 'Britneys'?

As in: ''Fancy going for a few Britneys later?''

Britney Spears = Beers.

As stated, keep building and keep it up to date. And your comments are welcome. Shame about the minority.

xSnoofovich
07-03-2008, 19:13
Coming soon, but I will need a dictionary :)

no - you misunderstood me - i meant, would people in south london laugh if i said -


that will be a 100 pounds, please, and i am like -
uh - youre pete , it should be 70 pounds even.

70 pounds ! 70 pounds ! are you on the double bouble? have you gone mad?

yea ! you berk - i am not paying a penny more, those charges for the ciggies arent ours, we only came in for a few britneys

Penelope
07-03-2008, 19:15
What they would do is then think you would understand all the other rhyming slang and you would then be up a creek without a paddle!

pullar
07-03-2008, 21:03
Gypsy said:

Barmy went out with the war,..."

This is completely wrong. I've used the word all my life, and I am a lot younger than War babies. A quick check on the Internet shows its use as recently as 2005 in a comment on an anti-terrorist proposal. The same can be said of several other remarks made by Gypsy. Further, the fact that some phrase is used on BBC TV hardly indicates that no one uses it in speech any more.

Bels
07-03-2008, 22:04
[QUOTE=pullar;357688]Gypsy said:

Barmy went out with the war,..."

This is completely wrong. I've used the word all my life, and I am a lot younger than War babies. A quick check on the Internet shows its use as recently as 2005 in a comment on an anti-terrorist proposal. The same can be said of several other remarks made by Gypsy. Further, the fact that some phrase is used on BBC TV hardly indicates that no one uses it in speech any more.[/QUOTE

Thank you very much pullar , you and others were what I was looking for. Please leave such remarks to r eal Brits, as honestly are such berks
around.
Sometimes the best tactics are to shutup for a while :) and hope the real cavalry come in and support you :)

Bels
07-03-2008, 22:06
Now do you want more? Or are you getting fedup with British slang. Do you want to know what on earth the london cabbie is talking about??