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Bels
04-03-2008, 21:41
Just for Penelope :)
The English dictionary for Eastenders, there are many more, also what's a bulls-eye?


General Lingo
cosmic -outstanding; exceptional
cushty - great; brilliant
dipstick - a fool
el-bow - also 'the Spanish fiddler', to end a relationship
enemy - wife, missus
Gandhi's revenge - a dodgy stomach
heave-ho - another way of saying 'el-bow'
hump - to be annoyed
humpty-dumpty - to perform sexual relations
jacksie - the posterior
jaffa - to be 'seedless' as in infertile, one who 'fires blanks'
lovely jubbly - brilliant, great, cushty
noofter - a gay man
plonker - an idiot
pukka - great, perfect
ruby - Indian takeaway cuisine
schtum - to keep quiet, keep a secret
sort - a woman, or bird
stoke on trent - a gay man
stone me - an exclamation of anguish
stuke - a difficult situation
this immortal curl - the world
triffic - great, wonderful
twonk - a plonker or dipstick
Wally - a twonk, a plonker, or a dipstick
cop - to receive something, or a police officer

Money Lingo

boracic or brassic - lacking in funds, skint
century - 100
douce in bunce - 200
earner - as in a "nice little ...", a profitable business transaction
grand - 1000
kosher readies - unlaundered money
monkey - 500
pony - 25
potless - to be skint
score - 2 ( I think this ones wrong)

bluemidnight
04-03-2008, 21:43
A bull's eye is a target, of the type made of circles within circles. =)

Bels
04-03-2008, 21:48
A bull's eye is a target, of the type made of circles within circles. =)

Correct and with many other meanings. It's well known in darts especially and archery. Is darts popular in Russia. The expression can also be used in monetary terms.

Bels
04-03-2008, 21:49
What's a bird or a shiela?

Bels
04-03-2008, 21:54
Not East London but still English in a way, and for non natives as it's easy for them. And please NO SCOTSMEN !!! what's a loch ?

I found this question interssting with my young Russian students, especially if you know how it's pronounced. :)

Judge
04-03-2008, 22:13
Cool thread Bels.you could go up and down England with this thread.Good place to start is the capital of England.
Good old Del Boy,the king of slang,for the ones who don't know Del Boy check out this link for more words.

BBC - Only Fools and Horses - Del's Lingo (http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/onlyfools/lingo/index.shtml)

Del Boy is fluent in many languages:reindeer::reindeer:

BBC - Only Fools and Horses - Del's Lingo (http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/onlyfools/lingo/euro.shtml)

Bels
04-03-2008, 22:18
Cool thread Bels.you could go up and down England with this thread.Good place to start is the capital of England.
Good old Del Boy,the king of slang,for the ones who don't know Del Boy check out this link for more words.

BBC - Only Fools and Horses - Del's Lingo (http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/onlyfools/lingo/index.shtml)

Del Boy is fluent in many languages:reindeer::reindeer:

BBC - Only Fools and Horses - Del's Lingo (http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/onlyfools/lingo/euro.shtml)

Yep! Your spot on, and check out on his foreign lingo. I'm a great fan of delboy in East London, Peckham. The greatest comedy hit in Britain, but unfortunately wasn't a hit outside the UK, coz they couldn't understand him :) Terrific acting, or should I say triffic.

Judge
04-03-2008, 22:25
Yep! Your spot on, and check out on his foreign lingo. I'm a great fan of delboy in East London, Peckham. The greatest comedy hit in Britain, but unfortunately wasn't a hit outside the UK, coz they couldn't understand him :) Terrific acting, or should I say triffic.

The best show ever,my wife got right into it and started calling me a plonker for months....cosmic man...just love it,I have them all on dvd(downloaded).

AstraTeaching
04-03-2008, 22:38
Bels, mate, that absolutely pukka! Cosmic in all regards. Cheers, you've made my day! Brought back my fondest memories of Eastenders and, of course, the delightful Del Boy.
ps: loch is a lake:), what are blads and emmets:)?

Bels
04-03-2008, 23:17
Bels, mate, that absolutely pukka! Cosmic in all regards. Cheers, you've made my day! Brought back my fondest memories of Eastenders and, of course, the delightful Del Boy.
ps: loch is a lake:), what are blads and emmets:)?

Kooshki, me ole mate :) Loved the one where they made a lot of dough from an old watch. " I wanna be a millionaire" and he made it. :) and he and they made it. What on earth is the whole world commumnity missing as the greatest comedy ever made universally.

But yes yes let's not forget a great soap "Eastenders" and of course the first ever televised soap ever from 1955 and still going strong now in the UK known as "Coronation street". And from where many other nationality t.v companies who copied our soaps without much success. Now that's learning English. Pukka!

AstraTeaching
04-03-2008, 23:20
You bring tears to me eyes, luve:)

Bels
04-03-2008, 23:26
Now that's it, I know who I'm going to call who a plonker is in the near future. You can only guess :)

Bels
04-03-2008, 23:32
The best show ever,my wife got right into it and started calling me a plonker for months....cosmic man...just love it,I have them all on dvd(downloaded).

Oh! please let me know how you download them. I used a search on a popular website and couldn't find. When I n=made a search there, and I downloaded, I got garbage.

For Russians, intermediate level or above, it's a great comedy series to experience, believe me :) And the greatest comedy ever from Britain.

Judge
08-03-2008, 09:55
Oh! please let me know how you download them. I used a search on a popular website and couldn't find. When I n=made a search there, and I downloaded, I got garbage.

For Russians, intermediate level or above, it's a great comedy series to experience, believe me :) And the greatest comedy ever from Britain.


Here you go.

only fools and horses - btjunkie (http://btjunkie.org/search?q=only+fools+and+horses)

You will need to download this first.
Azureus : Java BitTorrent Client - Download (http://azureus.sourceforge.net/download.php)

Gypsy
08-03-2008, 10:18
Yep! Your You're. The apostrophe replaces the space and first letter of the word "are". Thus you are really saying "You are" but in short form.
spot on, and check out on his foreign lingo. You can "check out" or "check on" but you cannot check out on.
I'm a great fan of delboy in East London, Peckham. The greatest comedy hit in Britain, but unfortunately wasn't a hit outside the UK, coz they couldn't understand him :) Terrific acting, or should I say triffic.

A much better set, but remember "Delboy" speak is not current and people trying to use it will be teased. And no-one has ever seriously said "cushty", or "lovely jubbly" in my living memory.

A score is 20.

Elbow does not have a hyphen in the middle. You keep writing el-bow.

And the point about East End slang is that people "outside" (originally the police) don't understand it - thus you would say the first part eg "butchers", (to look) but not the second rhyming part, "hook" as that would give the game away.

Again, you teach non-english speakers to use the full phrase and they will be laughed at.

And Peckham is in South East London; the distinction matters down there and to eastenders.

Bels
08-03-2008, 10:32
Here you go.

only fools and horses - btjunkie (http://btjunkie.org/search?q=only+fools+and+horses)

You will need to download this first.
Azureus : Java BitTorrent Client - Download (http://azureus.sourceforge.net/download.php)

Thanks Judge, you might not see me here for a fortnight as I relax and watch all the series of Only Fools and Horses.

And just as well, it'll help me relax away from such a berk that pesters this forum at the moment.

Thanks again and much appreciated.

Judge
08-03-2008, 10:51
Thanks Judge, you might not see me here for a fortnight as I relax and watch all the series of Only Fools and Horses.

And just as well, it'll help me relax away from such a berk that pesters this forum at the moment.

Thanks again and much appreciated.

Months of fun,i'm ready to go through them all again,one can never get bored of Del,Rodney ,Grandad , Uncle Albert,Trigger:bowdown::bowdown:(O right Dave)
and last but not least Boycie

Gypsy
08-03-2008, 11:18
Months of fun,i'm ready to go through them all again,one can never get bored of Del,Rodney ,Grandad , Uncle Albert,Trigger:bowdown::bowdown:(O right Dave)
and last but not least Boycie

My favourite, from memory:

Delboy "Rodders you did French, what's the word for duck?"

Rodney:"Canard."

Delboy: "You're telling me."

Judge
08-03-2008, 11:29
My favourite, from memory:

Delboy "Rodders you did French, what's the word for duck?"

Rodney:"Canard."

Delboy: "You're telling me."

Da da da.

Del boy thinks Rodeny is saying f**king hard(I hope I understood that right)
I don't speak french but to someone who does,it must be well funny when Del Boy mixes everything up.

Another funny moment is when they are held up in a supermarket by this robber and Rodney gets a chance to get hold of the gun but instead reaches for a pkt of cigs,a classic moment..:mml::mml::mml:
There are so many funny parts,we will be here all day talking about them..

Judge
08-03-2008, 11:40
YOU PLONKER..:wavey::wavey:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZYxJLVyM9g

Malypense
08-03-2008, 11:46
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plNjNNvQoUs

Gypsy
08-03-2008, 11:53
Da da da.

Del boy thinks Rodeny is saying f**king hard(I hope I understood that right)
I don't speak french but to someone who does,it must be well funny when Del Boy mixes everything up.

Another funny moment is when they are held up in a supermarket by this robber and Rodney gets a chance to get hold of the gun but instead reaches for a pkt of cigs,a classic moment..:mml::mml::mml:
There are so many funny parts,we will be here all day talking about them..

We could be, if you go to "geocities.com.hookyscripts" it is the site for all the scripts, no downloads needed.'kin easy in fact!

Again they are old now, but you will hear people, especially south of the river saying:-

'kin'ell - silent fu at the start and no g at the end
'kin'ard - as you say above.
etc

Malypense
08-03-2008, 12:20
The concept of Cockney Rhyming Slang is incredibly difficult for non-native speakers of English. I have only ever taught it to my top level students and even then they have found it very difficult, although highly amusing. They love the idea of it, but they find it very difficult to use.

If a non-native speaker of English suddenly started using slang like this (apart from maybe the occasional word like "berk" or "plonker") there is a high probability that (s)he would not be understood, unless his/her grasp of English was such that (s)he spoke it like a native.

Gypsy
08-03-2008, 12:42
The concept of Cockney-Rhyming Slang is incredibly difficult for non-native speakers of English. I have only ever taught it to my top level students and even then they have found it very difficult, although highly amusing. They love the idea of it but they find it very difficult to use.

If a non-native speaker of English suddenly started using slang like this (apart from maybe the occasional word like "berk" or "plonker") there is a high probability that (s)he would not be understood, unless his/her grasp of English was such that (s)he spoke it like a native.

Absolutely correct Mal -I lived in London from '68 to 80 and when I go back to where I lived and talk to my mates in the pub the slang has changed every time.

The slang originated as a means of being able to speak in front of the police without them knowing what you were saying - thus you would never use the whole phrase, as bels has suggested, because then the rhyme is obvious.

"Give us a butchers," for example sounds meaningless. Add the "hook" and someone could guess - butchers hook= look. So it means "Let me have a look at it."

"Got a new whistle? Give us a butchers. Nice, I'm brassic though"

And the scriptwriters wrote Delboy as a figure of fun and his slang as something to be laughed at - not copied. People laughed AT him when he said "cushty" or "lovely jubbly". No teacher should be recommending non english speakers to copy this. And it isn't worth learning as no-one says it.

Back to Moscow and: "It's Brass Monkeys out there mate."

Malypense
08-03-2008, 12:49
Indeed Gypsy. The language moves so fast that it's hard to keep up, it is also easy to sound out-of-date and uncool if using slang that is no longer really used or using it in the wrong way, a very dodgy area indeed.

If you are a native speaker you might have a chance of guessing what the missing word is and from there extrapolating the meaning from the context, but it is still quite hard.

One of my favourites though is: having a Jodrell ;)

Gypsy
08-03-2008, 13:03
Indeed Gypsy. The language moves so fast that it's hard to keep up, it is also easy to sound out-of-date and uncool if using slang that is no longer really used or using it in the wrong way, a very dodgy area indeed.

If you are a native speaker you might have a chance of guessing what the missing word is and from there extrapolating the meaning from the context, but it is still quite hard.

One of my favourites though is: having a Jodrell ;)

There you go.

It was a "J Arthur" in my day.

DJ Biscuit
08-03-2008, 19:03
A Doris is a woman, a brass is a tart.

And Bels, the venacualr is ''innit'' nowadays.

Bels
08-03-2008, 22:51
A Doris is a woman, a brass is a tart.

And Bels, the venacualr is ''innit'' nowadays.,

Third issue, I dont get you . reading your profile you're English. Innit is aint it or in proper terms isn't it.

Malypense
08-03-2008, 23:10
,

Third issue, I dont get you . reading your profile you're English. Innit is aint it or in proper terms isn't it.You're correct, but I think the previous poster is pointing out that 'ain't it' has now become 'innit', a friend from Stockport says his neighbour ends every sentence with it (although he spells it 'init' so I'm not sure which is the correct spelling, if, indeed, it has one!)

Bels
08-03-2008, 23:50
You're correct, but I think the previous poster is pointing out that 'ain't it' has now become 'innit', a friend from Stockport says his neighbour ends every sentence with it (although he spells it 'init' so I'm not sure which is the correct spelling, if, indeed, it has one!)

This issue has come recently in previous posts. Check up you dictionary for aint it . I used a Cambridge dictionarary. init I am not going to bother looking, as I don't believe it exists in spelling.

Judge
09-03-2008, 00:13
Cor blimey,I ain't been this confused about slang for years,innit great???:10518::10518:

Bels
09-03-2008, 00:19
Cor blimey,I ain't been this confused about slang for years,innit great???:10518::10518:

Now that sounds good :)

Transparent Theatre
09-03-2008, 00:37
And Peckham is in South East London; the distinction matters down there and to eastenders.

Na it bloody ain't, issin Sarf-Eas' Lunnun, oroight? Stone the bloody crows, eh...

;)

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 02:50
Na it bloody ain't, issin Sarf-Eas' Lunnun, oroight? Stone the bloody crows, eh...

;)

'Oo learnt you to talk proper then?

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 02:53
,

Third issue, I dont get you . reading your profile you're English. Innit is aint it or in proper terms isn't it.

That's DJB's point -you titled the thread and ended it "ain't it".This has been superceded by "innit" or"init" oop north.

And in what you call "proper terms" it is short for "is it not" - "isn't it" is itself an abbreviation.

Transparent Theatre
09-03-2008, 03:31
'Oo learnt you to talk proper then?

I 'ad special coachin' from Dick Van Dyke in "Mary Poppins", mate :)

Chim-chimminy, chim-chimminy, chim-chim, cheree,
When you're wiv a sweep you're in glad companee...

etc.

He was even "better" in "Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang" :mad:

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 08:31
I 'ad special coachin' from Dick Van Dyke in "Mary Poppins", mate :)

Chim-chimminy, chim-chimminy, chim-chim, cheree,
When you're wiv a sweep you're in glad companee...

etc.

He was even "better" in "Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang" :mad:

Sorry - his "London" accent in Mary Poppins is officially the worst accent in movie history

Malypense
09-03-2008, 08:52
It was some strange Australian dialect!

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 12:22
Not sure they'd want to own up to it though.

DJ Biscuit
09-03-2008, 17:18
The following are some new slang terms in use in London and England in general these days:

Airplane blonde - one who has dyed her hair but still has a 'black box"!

Bob Marley - another Modern Rhyming Slang term for 'Charlie' (cocaine). If used in it's short form (i.e. 'Bob') it could be confused with the older term 'Bob Hope' (dope).

Brad Pitt - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'shit'.

David Gower - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'shower', e.g. "Give us half an hour mate, I've gotta go for a David".

Donald Trump - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'dump' (defecate), e.g. "I'm just nipping out for a Donald".

Drink-link - a modern term for a cash point machine (ATM). Named so because it is common to visit one before going out on the booze!

Drum and bass - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'face', i.e. "Nice body, shame about the drum"

Edinburgh Fringe - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'minge' (vagina).

fishmonger - slang term for 'lesbian'

Frank and Pat - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'chat', e.g. "Do you ever stop your Frank and Pat!". After the well-known couple in Eastenders, the UK soap

Jackson Pollock(s) - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'b*llocks' (testicles). e.g. "He needs a good kick in the Jacksons".

Janet Street-Porter - Modern Rhyming Slang for a 'quarter' (of hashish).

Jean-Michel Jarre - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'bar', e.g. "Oi, Simon, get up to the Jean Michel, will ya!?".

Leo Sayer - an 'all-dayer' (drinking or a rave etc).

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 17:48
The following are some new slang terms in use in London and England in general these days:

Airplane blonde - one who has dyed her hair but still has a 'black box"!

No "matching collar and cuffs" then.


Drum and bass - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'face', i.e. "Nice body, shame about the drum" Shame,I always like "boat" for face. (short for Boat Race).

DJ Biscuit
09-03-2008, 18:30
Drum is also an old Romany word/slang for 'gaff' or house or dwelling. I believe it comes from their word 'drom' meaning road.

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 18:32
Drum used to be a word for your local too. maybe the same reason,deriving from house.

DJ Biscuit
09-03-2008, 18:37
Down the frog to the rubber for a few jars of rock 'n' roll mouth wash!

Gypsy
09-03-2008, 18:41
Down the frog to the rubber for a few jars of rock 'n' roll mouth wash!

You're a poet,mate. Catch you later, latish.