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SalTheReturn
01-03-2008, 02:26
So I am opening this new section where non native speakers are invited to post the sort of english words/phrases/etc... they could not understand despite of having a good dictionary

Here are my entries for today, look at the bolded words:

This is a feelgood buddy film
how in russian would you translaight "feelgood buddy film"???

The "Bucket List" strikes a bum note from the start
to strike a bum note???

With laddish abandon they go skydiving and...
laddish abandon???

The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each other
all sentence???

One of those deluded men who think rudeness is daring irreverence
rudeness is daring irreverence??? what "to dare" means in this contest?

lofty???

Thanks a lot

Sal

IraM
01-03-2008, 20:34
This is a feelgood buddy film
how in russian would you translaight "feelgood buddy film"???

The "Bucket List" strikes a bum note from the startto strike a bum note???

With laddish abandon they go skydiving and...laddish abandon???

The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each otherall sentence???

One of those deluded men who think rudeness is daring irreverence
rudeness is daring irreverence??? what "to dare" means in this contest?

lofty???


Possible variants:

feelgood buddy film - веселый (оптимистичный) фильм о друзьях (дружбе)

to strike a bum note - создать плохое настроение

laddish abandon (coll. with abandon so with laddish abandon) - с юношеской энергией (страстью)

The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each other - context, please

rudeness is daring irreverence - грубость - это дерзкое пренебрежение традициями (нормами и законами общества и др.)
daring is an adjective

lofty - a few meanings - so, again, context, please



Here are my entries for today, look at the bolded words

BTW, your words are given in italics not in bold type.


Sal, why do you need these things translated into Russian not into Italian?;)

Bels
01-03-2008, 20:44
So I am opening this new section where non native speakers are invited to post the sort of english words/phrases/etc... they could not understand despite of having a good dictionary

Here are my entries for today, look at the bolded words:

This is a feelgood buddy film
how in russian would you translaight "feelgood buddy film"???

The "Bucket List" strikes a bum note from the start
to strike a bum note???

With laddish abandon they go skydiving and...
laddish abandon???

The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each other
all sentence???

One of those deluded men who think rudeness is daring irreverence
rudeness is daring irreverence??? what "to dare" means in this contest?

lofty???

Thanks a lot

Sal

It's garbage sal, throw it in the wastepaper bin.

Bels
01-03-2008, 20:49
Possible variants:

feelgood buddy film - веселый (оптимистичный) фильм о друзьях (дружбе)

to strike a bum note - создать плохое настроение

laddish abandon (coll. with abandon so with laddish abandon) - с юношеской энергией (страстью)

The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each other - context, please

rudeness is daring irreverence - грубость - это дерзкое пренебрежение традициями (нормами и законами общества и др.)
daring is an adjective

lofty - a few meanings - so, again, context, please




BTW, your words are given in italics not in bold type.


Sal, why do you need these things translated into Russian not into Italian?;)

Lofty mean tall, often thin

Bels
01-03-2008, 20:58
What's the Americans got to say about this, I think the quotes. But Iguess he got them from somewhere . Yes I admit with lofty as it's British English. But te rest rest sounds like garbage.

Couldn't you come up with something else sal. I work with my wife translating some American and some British telivision programmes, and I haven't come across this garbage.

I must admit my wife has less problems with BBC [programmes than she does with American tv programmes. I have no problen with either.

But your quotes are shit.

IraM
01-03-2008, 20:59
Lofty mean tall, often thin

As well as noble and superior. That's why the context is a must.


It's garbage sal, throw it in the wastepaper bin.

And very often - media lingo.:)

SalTheReturn
01-03-2008, 21:06
LOL LOL LOL

I wanted only the feelgood buddy's deal to be translated into russian

for the other ones i want to understand what do they mean, not thru an italian translation but thru other examples in english

thanks

Sal

SalTheReturn
01-03-2008, 21:06
It's garbage sal, throw it in the wastepaper bin.

probably not garbage, probably your english is garbage

all this sentence where film reviews excerpts from the NeyYorkTimes

SalTheReturn
01-03-2008, 21:08
Possible variants:

feelgood buddy film - веселый (оптимистичный) фильм о друзьях (дружбе)

to strike a bum note - создать плохое настроение

laddish abandon (coll. with abandon so with laddish abandon) - с юношеской энергией (страстью)

The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each other - context, please

rudeness is daring irreverence - грубость - это дерзкое пренебрежение традициями (нормами и законами общества и др.)
daring is an adjective

lofty - a few meanings - so, again, context, please




BTW, your words are given in italics not in bold type.


Sal, why do you need these things translated into Russian not into Italian?;)

anyway for the first 3 examples i could get what they mean even using your russian explanations

i did not even have to use a dictionary!!!

SalTheReturn
01-03-2008, 21:10
What's the Americans got to say about this, I think the quotes. But Iguess he got them from somewhere . Yes I admit with lofty as it's British English. But te rest rest sounds like garbage.

Couldn't you come up with something else sal. I work with my wife translating some American and some British telivision programmes, and I haven't come across this garbage.

I must admit my wife has less problems with BBC [programmes than she does with American tv programmes. I have no problen with either.

But your quotes are shit.

Bels, your criticism is so constructive!!!

Bels
01-03-2008, 21:15
Thank you sal :)

But can you give us some better American phrases, please. In all due respect to the Americans there are some better ones.:10806:

Nice start for a thread Sal. Welldone. But your examples are garbage.

Bels
01-03-2008, 21:32
How about the differences of American for example:

What do Americans call pavements, flats, biscuits, petrol,accelerating, Asking for direction to a particular direction will be completely different from what a Brit will give for example.

Real estate to Brits are Estate agents,, the difference is endless.And the famous ones color is colour, and tires are tires, boy !! I feel so tired!! matter

We are different and it doesn't matter, except when we are dealing with serious business. It's no good a russian who is representing a british company who use American terminology, because it will look ridiculous and stupid, but they continue to do it. In business language we are completely different.

Bels
01-03-2008, 21:45
probably not garbage, probably your english is garbage

all this sentence where film reviews excerpts from the NeyYorkTimes

I think garbage, I think from those who cannot even speak English probably. Those are bad examples, and I'm sticking up with the yanks on this one. The phrases are not great, hopefully you will come up with better phrases, British or AMERICAN PHRASES, Because I'm not impressed.

Bels
01-03-2008, 21:54
Beliee me my English is probably better than your Italian, I learnt to read and write from the age of three. When I went to school I found it boring in English, I quickly answered the questions ,and continued to read. I wrote and I wrote well. Thanks to my Grandmother and my early interest in books.

This appears to be the same stage as my son . Who is not yet two years old. Yet he is fascinated with books, and cannot sleep without his dad covering one of his favourite books. He can comminacate and with some speaking with each book he loves.

SalTheReturn
01-03-2008, 22:50
could you open your own thread and get away from here?

yes your english is so good that not even your fellow nationals understand what you mean

leave me alone please

Bels
01-03-2008, 22:55
But I don't know what you mean

SalTheReturn
02-03-2008, 05:28
But I don't know what you mean

LOL LOL LOL we never know what you mean!!!

Sal

SalTheReturn
02-03-2008, 15:08
We see the terrible physical hardships and the loneliness that at times seem to push him over the edge.

Gypsy
02-03-2008, 15:17
So I am opening this new section where non native speakers are invited to post the sort of english words/phrases/etc... they could not understand despite of having a good dictionary

Here are my entries for today, look at the bolded words:

This is a feelgood buddy film
how in russian would you translaight "feelgood buddy film"???

The "Bucket List" strikes a bum note from the start
to strike a bum note???
To hit the wrong, discordant note. ie it was poor and unbelievable from the start.


With laddish abandon they go skydiving and...
laddish abandon??? without any care - lads, young men are typically carefree.


The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each other
all sentence??? there was no chemistry between them,they did not convince the watcher that the relationship there was real.


One of those deluded men who think rudeness is daring irreverence
rudeness is daring irreverence??? what "to dare" means in this contest? Daring is almost dangerous but not quite. It might be daring to steal from a shop for example.


lofty??? Lofty refers to height,but is often used for lofty ambitions. ie aiming for something high, maybe even unobtainable.

Thanks a lot

Sal[/QUOTE]

Gypsy
02-03-2008, 15:25
What's the Americans got to say about this, I think the quotes. But Iguess he got them from somewhere . Yes I admit with lofty as it's British English. But te rest rest sounds like garbage. What HAVE the Americans etc Americans is plural.


Couldn't you come up with something else sal. [/QUOTE}Question mark?[QUOTE]I work with my wife translating some American and some British telivision television perhaps?
programmes, and I haven't come across this garbage.

I must admit my wife has less Fewer, Less describes quantity; Fewer describes number
. problems with BBC [programmes than she does with American tv programmes. I have no problen with either.

But your quotes are shit. and problem ends in m.

Bels
02-03-2008, 15:43
I appear to have got Quipsy's feathersrs ruffled again. :) By the way Americans are plural :)

SalTheReturn
02-03-2008, 15:52
To hit the wrong, discordant note. ie it was poor and unbelievable from the start.
without any care - lads, young men are typically carefree.

there was no chemistry between them,they did not convince the watcher that the relationship there was real.

Daring is almost dangerous but not quite. It might be daring to steal from a shop for example.

Lofty refers to height,but is often used for lofty ambitions. ie aiming for something high, maybe even unobtainable.

Thanks a lot

Sal[/QUOTE]

thanks a lot

SalTheReturn
02-03-2008, 15:53
To hit the wrong, discordant note. ie it was poor and unbelievable from the start.
without any care - lads, young men are typically carefree.

there was no chemistry between them,they did not convince the watcher that the relationship there was real.

Daring is almost dangerous but not quite. It might be daring to steal from a shop for example.

Lofty refers to height,but is often used for lofty ambitions. ie aiming for something high, maybe even unobtainable.

Thanks a lot

Sal[/QUOTE]

as regards "to strike a bum not from the start" another poster said it means "to create a bad feeling/mood"

Gypsy
02-03-2008, 16:47
I appear to have got Quipsy's feathersrs ruffled again. :) By the way Americans are plural :)

Exactly so you cannot say "has americans" you have to say HAVE Americans. 3rd person plural - they HAVE, not they has, which you wrote.

Jeez.

Gypsy
02-03-2008, 16:49
as regards "to strike a bum not from the start" another poster said it means "to create a bad feeling/mood"[/QUOTE]

Yes -it could well mean that too - it depends on context. If there were more than a few words we could give better definitions.

Bels
02-03-2008, 17:52
Thank you for your lesson on the present simple of which I am fully aware of, aint I ? :)

SalTheReturn
02-03-2008, 17:55
Thank you for your lesson on the present simple of which I am fully aware of, aint I ? :)

Bels pls leave this thread, pls

do not you realize how annoying you are?

Gypsy
02-03-2008, 18:27
Thank you for your lesson on the present simple of which I am fully aware of, aint I ? :)

If it is something of which you are fully aware then why did you not write it correctly in your post? And you split an infinitive above. Neither are good examples to non english speakers.

Gypsy
02-03-2008, 18:33
What's the Americans got to say about this,

Americans is plural - you can tell because of the "s" at the end. So you should have written "What HAVE (plural) the Americans got to say about this? The apostrophe s replaces "has" the singular, not the plural.

SalTheReturn
02-03-2008, 18:45
My thread is completely hijacked...where are the mods please???:cussing::cussing::cussing:

Judge
04-03-2008, 00:16
Please respect Sal's thread,no hijacking.
Keep up the good work Sal.

pullar
04-03-2008, 14:35
Lofty mean tall, often thin

It can also mean showing a feeling of superiority in some contexts

Penelope
04-03-2008, 14:58
So I am opening this new section where non native speakers are invited to post the sort of english words/phrases/etc... they could not understand despite of having a good dictionary

Here are my entries for today, look at the bolded words:

This is a feelgood buddy film
how in russian would you translaight "feelgood buddy film"???

The "Bucket List" strikes a bum note from the start
to strike a bum note???

With laddish abandon they go skydiving and...
laddish abandon???

The 2 guys do not spark and reel off each other
all sentence???

One of those deluded men who think rudeness is daring irreverence
rudeness is daring irreverence??? what "to dare" means in this contest?

lofty???

Thanks a lot

Sal
Sal, I think you've got a great idea here. :thumbsup: I think it might be easier if you posted one phrase at a time, however, rather than a whole lot of them.

Penelope
04-03-2008, 15:00
It's garbage sal, throw it in the wastepaper bin.
Bels, if you can't contribute positively to the thread, stop yanking his chain!

elis
04-03-2008, 15:04
. . .yanking his chain!

Meaning: pulling his leg, getting his goat . . .

:)

Bels
04-03-2008, 18:02
Meaning: pulling his leg, getting his goat . . .

:)

Pulling his leg, and getting his goat have two different meaning. Pulling his leg is often what many of us do to sal, and in return he gets his goat.

kirk10071
04-03-2008, 18:03
Pulling his leg, and getting his goat have two different meaning. Pulling his leg is often what many of us do to sal, and in return he gets his goat.

No, Bels. WE get his goat. That means we make him upset. He doesn't get his own goat.

Penelope
04-03-2008, 18:07
Pulling his leg, and getting his goat have two different meaning. Pulling his leg is often what many of us do to sal, and in return he gets his goat.
Are you sure you're a native English speaker? :suspect:How long have you been living here?

Bels
04-03-2008, 18:07
No, Bels. WE get his goat. That means we make him upset. He doesn't get his own goat.

OK! OK! We get his goat = make him angry
Having his leg pulled or pull his leg is to joke with him. :) and then make him angry :)

Bels
04-03-2008, 18:40
Are you sure you're a native English speaker? :suspect:How long have you been living here?

Indeed I am and used to such expressions with out checking it out in a book.Do you doubt my answers of what they mean?

I've been here for about four years, but I must admit I miss conversation with a British native speaker. And I have learnt to avoid a lot of expressions when speaking to second language speakers.

Penelope
04-03-2008, 18:53
I've been watching British TV for much of my life, and I have several friends and colleagues from the UK, and you often cite completely different meanings for common colloquial expressions than I've ever heard. You also use expressions that no expat.ru poster from the UK (other than yourself) seems to have ever heard of.

Bels
04-03-2008, 19:12
I've been watching British TV for much of my life, and I have several friends and colleagues from the UK, and you often cite completely different meanings for common colloquial expressions than I've ever heard. You also use expressions that no expat.ru poster from the UK (other than yourself) seems to have ever heard of.

Where on earth are coming from? Are you giving me stick? Or are you winding me up?
It's time to take control of the teachers folder and start a real thread about real phrasal verbs etc.

I've neglected the folder for too long.

Penelope
04-03-2008, 19:21
For example. I've never heard the expression "to give someone stick". Perhaps it's a very localized colloquialism from the area where you were reared.

SalTheReturn
04-03-2008, 19:47
Thanks a lot for the great help you are giving (this exclude the "functionally illitterate" guy who is up for messing rather than helping)

I will now collect the info I have received about my questions

Then i will close the thread and open a new one and keep it tied

See you in few days

Sal

Bels
04-03-2008, 19:53
For example. I've never heard the expression "to give someone stick". Perhaps it's a very localized colloquialism from the area where you were reared.

Not localised, it's international and in the Cambridge dictionary. in regards to British television have you ever watched " Only fools and horses"?

IraM
04-03-2008, 19:54
Dear native speakers

Please remember Sal's plea for not hijacking his thread! While defending him you seem to lose track again, don't you?


what does it mean?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We see the terrible physical hardships and the loneliness that at times seem to push him over the edge.


For example. I've never heard the expression "to give someone stick". Perhaps it's a very localized colloquialism from the area where you were reared.

My Dictionary of Idioms (Collins COBUILD) says this
If someone gives you stick or if you get a lot of stick, you are criticized, often in an unfair way or for something that is not your fault. BrE expression. I've seen this only once in a book (unfortunately I don't remember its title/author). So I, too, would like to find out how often it is used in colloquial English.

elis
04-03-2008, 19:55
No, Bels. WE get his goat. That means we make him upset. He doesn't get his own goat.

Indeed. If he got his own goat, he wouldn't get peeved.

For anyone who cares, here's the background on goats. Thought this was interesting. (As this explains the origin of a phrase, I do believe I'm not off thread. :) ):

"It all began with thoroughbred horses, which have a tendency to be very jumpy, nervous animals. Goats are the exact opposite. Calm and unshakable. Someone noticed this contrast and wondered if the goat's demeanor would have a calming influence on the horse. As a test, a goat was put into the stall of a thoroughbred horse. As hoped, the horse calmed a bit AND, most importantly, the horse ran better in its next race.

Next thing you knew, all thoroughbreds stalls had a companion goat.

Soon some unscrupulous owners began kidnapping (pun?) the goats of competitor's horses, hoping the disruption would help their still goat-calmed horses to win their races.

Out of this practice came the phrase "to get one's goat."

(from Get One's Goat - Origin Story | Wanderings (http://www.wanderings.net/notebook/Main/GetOnesGoatOriginStory))

SalTheReturn
04-03-2008, 19:58
thread was turned into crap by the usual trio

this time i am taking the issue to the customer service or the obusdman of this site if necessary

learn to respect young students

Penelope
04-03-2008, 20:05
Not localised, it's international and in the Cambridge dictionary. in regards to British television have you ever watched " Only fools and horses"?
I've found it on Wiktionary, with 6 citations. I apologize Bels, especially with regard to "to give stick".

Bels
04-03-2008, 20:24
Thank you Penelope, let's stick together, and not be such a stick in the mud. Stick around and you might learn something. Just stick to it and look up the word stick in a good dictionary. It might also be a good idea to check-up the word give and get.

Bels
04-03-2008, 20:30
I think Sal has given up and has moved to his next thread. He's also giving it a go on TOEFL