PDA

View Full Version : Nuclear Missle Cruiser May Explode



Random
23-03-2004, 13:03
From Interfax:

A Russian nuclear cruiser may explode at any moment and is returning to port.

(Peter the Great heavy missle cruiser)

Sheepy
23-03-2004, 13:09
Eeeek!! Any particular direction? Now where did I put my passport?:eek:

Random
23-03-2004, 13:12
I got it from Bloomberg ...

kak
23-03-2004, 13:34
actually nobody said/knows (i mean in the medias) where the cruiser is ... but normally his harbor is Severomorsk near Mourmansk

ghost 6-3
23-03-2004, 13:45
MOSCOW (Reuters) - The head of the Russian navy on Tuesday ordered the Northern Fleet's nuclear-powered flagship, "Peter the Great," into dock, saying it was in such a poor state it could blow up at any time, Interfax news agency said.

"The ship is in such a condition that it may blow up any minute," the agency quoted Admiral Vladimir Kuroyedov as saying. "It is especially dangerous since the vessel is equipped with a nuclear reactor," Kuroyedov said, adding he came to this conclusion when visiting the vessel last week.

Kuroyedov made his alarming comments about the cruiser, whose 20 cruise missiles can be equipped with nuclear warheads, as President Vladimir Putin was due to meet top brass in Moscow about social conditions for servicemen.

Kuroyedov gave the crew of the ship two weeks to fix up unspecified problems on board, which he made clear were connected with maintenance of the nuclear reactor. He said he discovered problems when inspecting the ship last week.

"In areas where admirals walk around it looks all right, but in places they do not visit, the situation is such that it (the ship) may explode any minute," he said. "I mean among other things maintaining the nuclear reactor."

In 2003, "Peter the Great," which frequently hosts top officials including Putin himself, was declared the Fleet's model ship.

Kuroyedov made his remarks after the popular daily newspaper Kommersant published an article Tuesday saying the reason for bringing the ship into dock was the result of a power struggle among top Russian admirals.

Kommersant said Kuroyedov unexpectedly told the crew last week that their ship was going into dock.

Zachariah
23-03-2004, 14:27
Originally posted by Sheepy
Eeeek!! Any particular direction? Now where did I put my passport?:eek:

We will not need a passport where we are headed!
Z
:wavey:

Random
23-03-2004, 14:34
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3560249.stm

ReturnOfBroadmoor
23-03-2004, 15:06
Looks like the threat is being blown way out of proportion for some sort of internal political game.

ghost 6-3
23-03-2004, 15:11
Also, those types of ships are designed to be as idiot-proof as possible. They would have to be able to withstand battle damage (without going boom), and maintenance and operation by conscripts.

It does sound political. But then, wasn't Chernobyl run by a bunch of political hacks?

aliwilliams
23-03-2004, 16:12
My Nuclear weapons authority tells me that in theory the reactor should be shut down on the ship and all trigger devices removed from the weaponry when it is seen to be a risk. Russia has assured the EU that this is the case. Reactor leakage can be contained, but will probably cost the lives of all on board unless the crew is evacuated early on.

However, Chernobyl was being run by some guys who didn't know how to shut down a nuclear reactor and did the exact opposite of what you should do when it gets a little over excited. If you take the rods out then then it gets very hot and eventually cracks.

Let's hope that these boys have done the right thing.

camaeljax
23-03-2004, 16:24
I must concur with the recnt posts. It is being blown WAY out of proportion by some political internal struggle.
I served in the Nuclear Engineering Sept of a guided missle cruiser in the US Navy for 6 years (CGN-37 to be exact) - We studied the russian ships and designs in Academy as well of course - the risk is minimal at worst case scenario. Russian engineering indeed is designed to take a licking and keep on ticking. Many redundant systems and safeguards and the like. BBC and the rest of the world yellow press flying over the top at the first whisper of the dreaded word "nuclear", as usual - like clockwork in fact.

jheisel
23-03-2004, 17:43
"The admiral of Russia's navy, Vladimir Kuroyedov has retracted his early comment that one of the fleet's nuclear-powered missile crusiers could explode at any minute. He said his comments had been misunderstood. "

legspreader
23-03-2004, 17:50
Originally posted by aliwilliams
My Nuclear weapons authority tells me that in theory the reactor should be shut down on the ship and all trigger devices removed from the weaponry when it is seen to be a risk. Russia has assured the EU that this is the case. Reactor leakage can be contained, but will probably cost the lives of all on board unless the crew is evacuated early on.

However, Chernobyl was being run by some guys who didn't know how to shut down a nuclear reactor and did the exact opposite of what you should do when it gets a little over excited. If you take the rods out then then it gets very hot and eventually cracks.

Let's hope that these boys have done the right thing.

that and the design was only single barrier domes instead of two as are found in the west

legspreader
23-03-2004, 17:52
Originally posted by camaeljax
I must concur with the recnt posts. It is being blown WAY out of proportion by some political internal struggle.
I served in the Nuclear Engineering Sept of a guided missle cruiser in the US Navy for 6 years (CGN-37 to be exact) - We studied the russian ships and designs in Academy as well of course - the risk is minimal at worst case scenario. Russian engineering indeed is designed to take a licking and keep on ticking. Many redundant systems and safeguards and the like. BBC and the rest of the world yellow press flying over the top at the first whisper of the dreaded word "nuclear", as usual - like clockwork in fact.

problem in many cases safe guards are disabled ala Chernobyl. im sure if you looked at its design and safeguards you could have said the same....

camaeljax
23-03-2004, 18:19
I'm sorry (laughing)
I just can't believe I am having a tit fo tat on a Russian forum on a post about nuclear design and operation with a guy with the moniker "leg spreader". The world is truly an absurd joke played on us all by some malevolent diety with a shitty sense of humor

ghost 6-3
23-03-2004, 18:19
If we are going to talk Chernobyl, then we have to talk about the Davis-Beese reactor run by First Energy, which came with 1/8 inch of making us forget about Chernoble. Here is a (very) small portion of a transcript taken from part of the investigation carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The NRC also published the Root Cause Report for this narrowly averted disaster. Great reading (if you can handle 850 pages of nuclear goobly-gook (I managed 35). You won't sleep too well afterwards, though.


"The company identified a number of cracks in the penetrations which was not unexpected. Some of those cracks went the whole way through the penetration, and they had leaked out onto the top of the reactor pressure vessel head. In the process of repairing those cracks, the company identified that there had been a cavity that developed next to one of the penetrations. When I say a cavity, what I mean, it was about four to five inches wide and about six or seven inches long. It was kind of an oblong shaped -- and it went the whole way through the six and a half inches of steel in that area, and what happened is boric acid corroded the steel away. Boric acid is an additive to the reactor coolant. It's added to the reactor coolant at very mild levels on the orders of hundreds to a couple of thousands parts per million to control the nuclear reaction the system controlling the nuclear reaction. The element boron is useful in that regard. When the leakage occurred through the penetration, the cracks in the penetration, the boric acid became more concentrated and corrosive and corroded the steel. The -- the result of the corrosion was that the liner on the inside of the normal steel that's referred to as low alloyed steel, there's a stainless steel liner, and that's the only material that was left that was retaining the reactor pressure, the reactor coolant system pressure.

Wanderer
23-03-2004, 20:01
I don't suppose bin laden and all his mates are crewing this ship ?

DaveUKagain
23-03-2004, 23:20
Sorry, folks, but unless there`s a catastrophic leakage of coolant on a reactor and the damper rods somehow fail to drop, the chances of a boom are pretty low. ;-))))))))

DaveUKagain
24-03-2004, 02:03
PS Ohhh yes, I seem to recall that the first working reactor was built on the tennis court of some university somewhere, and cooling was achieved by, er, students pouring buckets of water over it........ "Step forwards a volunteer for a dangerous job"..... "Ti plyvee, plyvee bez strashna"...... (apologies for spelling :) )

geofizz56
24-03-2004, 08:08
I think that was the University of Chicago. I've never met anyone from there who was completely normal. My paleo professor was a Chicago grad, and his hobby was analyzing the distribution of species and characteristics of breakage of McDonald's animal crackers. Maybe there's still a nuclear cloud over the place.

ghost 6-3
24-03-2004, 10:33
Dave,

You are right about the rods. That is why the Davis-Beese reactor head damage was so dangerous. If it had burst, (only 1/8 inch of stainless steel covering was left), it would have sprayed the preasurized coolant on the rod control mechanisms. There was no guarantee that they would have worked under these conditions to drop the rods, as they were not designed for such a scenario, which was considered highly improbable.

The reactor at the University of Chicago was designed and built by Enrico Fermi.