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AstraTeaching
25-02-2008, 14:12
Since my husband has been offered a job in London, we will move there in May.
However, he has to start in March, which means that I will spend some time here being a single mother:), abeit one with a nanny!
Nevetheless, I will not be able to keep some of my private students (two of them are in the morning and one - on Friday evening).
All are well-paying, good students and I will gladly pass them on to somebody who has time and is a quality teacher.

Now, the question - should I ask for comission? Is it an acceptable practice here? And how much should it be?

:11088: (this smile was put here on the request of my son)

IraM
25-02-2008, 14:42
I sometimes pass my students on to other teachers and vice versa and none of us ask for comission. I cannot say if this (I mean comission) is unacceptable for all the teachers here though - just don't know.

SalTheReturn
25-02-2008, 15:29
my suggestion is that you should get a commission

so contact an agency and talk to them directly about your clients

IraM
25-02-2008, 16:04
I should not pass my students on to any agence/language school. I, first, do not know their teachers - their qualification/experience etc. Second, even if a school offers individual classes it normally charges more than a private teacher (native let alone non-native). I'd rather pass them on to the teachers I personally know or the teachers my friends know and could recommend.

I suppose that the teachers who tell us about their students they cannot teach any longer mind such things like quality/reputation otherwise they might as well wave goodbye to their students.

Sounds too idealistic?

And have you ever heard about or have you got any comission from any agency? Please enlighten us!

AstraTeaching
25-02-2008, 16:15
I suppose that the teachers who tell us about their students they cannot teach any longer mind such things like quality/reputation otherwise they might as well wave goodbye to their students.


Exactly! Because of it I don't want my educated, rich and good-looking students (all girls) to fall prey to some teaching cowboys (no offence intended).

OK, I got an idea about the setup, although I will still ask for the milk chocolate bar:)

I will open a new thread regarding my students when I will understand what my schedule will look like (mid-March).

SalTheReturn
25-02-2008, 17:52
I should not pass my students on to any agence/language school. I, first, do not know their teachers - their qualification/experience etc. Second, even if a school offers individual classes it normally charges more than a private teacher (native let alone non-native). I'd rather pass them on to the teachers I personally know or the teachers my friends know and could recommend.

I suppose that the teachers who tell us about their students they cannot teach any longer mind such things like quality/reputation otherwise they might as well wave goodbye to their students.

Sounds too idealistic?

And have you ever heard about or have you got any comission from any agency? Please enlighten us!

of course you should know some agents and know they are good ones

without going too much into details, yes a 12,5% commission

SalTheReturn
25-02-2008, 17:53
Exactly! Because of it I don't want my educated, rich and good-looking students (all girls) to fall prey to some teaching cowboys (no offence intended).

OK, I got an idea about the setup, although I will still ask for the milk chocolate bar:)

I will open a new thread regarding my students when I will understand what my schedule will look like (mid-March).

but this is weird, how teachers do not know other teachers? no friends to pass your clients on?

is4fun
25-02-2008, 19:36
Since my husband has been offered a job in London, we will move there in May.
However, he has to start in March, which means that I will spend some time here being a single mother:), abeit one with a nanny!
Nevetheless, I will not be able to keep some of my private students (two of them are in the morning and one - on Friday evening).
All are well-paying, good students and I will gladly pass them on to somebody who has time and is a quality teacher.

Now, the question - should I ask for comission? Is it an acceptable practice here? And how much should it be?

:11088: (this smile was put here on the request of my son)

Interesting to note that you feel your students are a commodity. Are you not concerned in the education they may receive from the highest bidder?

AstraTeaching
25-02-2008, 23:34
If I would ask for % (which I would not, but it seems to me that you have not bothered to read the thread), I would certainly meet with teachers before making the judgement.

alterego
26-02-2008, 06:08
I've never heard of any teachers taking a commission although I don't think it is unconscionable. Agencies take commissions but they take them from the students not the teachers and they provide additional services such as writing up a contract and arbitrating if there is a problem. That suggests that your commission should be smaller although students that I've aquired through agencies paid a very hefty fee.
The bottom line is that it is a teacher's market. Students are a dime a dozen. Native speaking teachers are rare. This site is full of teachers looking for someone to take their students. I turn away prospective students weekly and I am often asked if I know of any other teachers. So good luck finding a teacher (a good one) who will pay you a commission.
Now what you might consider doing is charging your students a commission to get them a new teacher.

SalTheReturn
26-02-2008, 10:25
I've never heard of any teachers taking a commission although I don't think it is unconscionable. Agencies take commissions but they take them from the students not the teachers and they provide additional services such as writing up a contract and arbitrating if there is a problem. That suggests that your commission should be smaller although students that I've aquired through agencies paid a very hefty fee.
The bottom line is that it is a teacher's market. Students are a dime a dozen. Native speaking teachers are rare. This site is full of teachers looking for someone to take their students. I turn away prospective students weekly and I am often asked if I know of any other teachers. So good luck finding a teacher (a good one) who will pay you a commission.
Now what you might consider doing is charging your students a commission to get them a new teacher.

what you guys do not understand that there are still tons of teachers who came to moscow straight after college and have no clue on how to market themselves. these are all the teachers working at the BigMacSchools and believe me (been there done that) their salaries are so low that they would not mind to pay you a commission.

so would i be desperate to find replacement for my students and eager meanwhile to make some cash on top of that, i would just hang around the BigMacSchools. of course you have to make sure teacher is good, but honestly, despite of them being offered thirld world salaries, i must say they put in lots of effort to their work and many turned out to be good teachers.

that was not my case, the less you were paying me the worst i was (and in fact i lost 6 customers - not my privates of course!), the more you were paying me the better i was LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL

SalTheReturn
26-02-2008, 10:27
btw asking commission is fair

i had very good italian friend in moscow, we still regularly visit each other, and honestly our friendship is beautiful

when leaving moscow i passed him 3/4 clients of mine, in exchange i asked him a forfait of 100euros

this did not compromise our relation at all, clever people understand that you have worked to get your clients and you dont feel like sparing humanitarian aid

Bels
26-02-2008, 11:50
what you guys do not understand that there are still tons of teachers who came to moscow straight after college and have no clue on how to market themselves. these are all the teachers working at the BigMacSchools and believe me (been there done that) their salaries are so low that they would not mind to pay you a commission.

so would i be desperate to find replacement for my students and eager meanwhile to make some cash on top of that, i would just hang around the BigMacSchools. of course you have to make sure teacher is good, but honestly, despite of them being offered thirld world salaries, i must say they put in lots of effort to their work and many turned out to be good teachers.

that was not my case, the less you were paying me the worst i was (and in fact i lost 6 customers - not my privates of course!), the more you were paying me the better i was LOL LOL LOL LOL LOL

What were you teaching Sal, Italian or English ?

Bels
26-02-2008, 11:52
Good post, I totally agree and I can add no more.


I've never heard of any teachers taking a commission although I don't think it is unconscionable. Agencies take commissions but they take them from the students not the teachers and they provide additional services such as writing up a contract and arbitrating if there is a problem. That suggests that your commission should be smaller although students that I've aquired through agencies paid a very hefty fee.
The bottom line is that it is a teacher's market. Students are a dime a dozen. Native speaking teachers are rare. This site is full of teachers looking for someone to take their students. I turn away prospective students weekly and I am often asked if I know of any other teachers. So good luck finding a teacher (a good one) who will pay you a commission.
Now what you might consider doing is charging your students a commission to get them a new teacher.

smchilds
26-02-2008, 13:56
I haven't heard of a teacher asking for a commission when giving students to another teacher. As far as I understand, you are going to stop teaching someone, you donít want to leave him/her in a lurch, so you help him/her find a new teacher. If you have a bunch of students, and want to find experienced teachers for them, there probably wonít be one teacher who can take them all. Maybe you will need several teachers. Besides, even if the teacher is good (which it will be hard for you to tell unless you know him/her), you canít be sure that the teacher will even gel with the student. So, if someone were going to pay commission, he/she would have to be sure that the student was going to work out. So, youíd have to meet with the teacher(s), figure out a commission (honestly, it couldnít be a lot), find some way to understand if the teacher would be suitable, and in the end it would be a sort of headache. I could take a student off someoneís hands, but I would never do it for a commission. So, I think the only people who would be interested in taking students for commission would be those teachers who are inexperienced/are really lacking students for whatever reason, and would you really want to give your students to those people? If you care about helping out your students, I think the best thing is get together a few e-mail addresses/phone numbers, pass them onto your students, and let them choose their new teachers themselves. (I suppose I second the idea that it might make more sense to charge the student a fee to help him/her find a new teacher.)
I guess someone mentioned taking a regular percentage of the payment, and I canít see any teacher agreeing to that. In order to get a regular commission, I think you need to be providing something (academic support, guarantee of no cancelled lessons, etc. etc.).

SalTheReturn
26-02-2008, 15:44
What were you teaching Sal, Italian or English ?

I am a LifeCoach:fridaysign:

alterego
26-02-2008, 15:49
Here's another thought.
Since it seems to be difficult to get replacement teachers, suggest to your students that they offer a 'signing bonus' for a new teacher. Or maybe get the bonus after one month if the student decides to keep the teacher.

Then if you're greedy/hungry/whatever you can ask the new teacher to split it with you.

I wouldn't be too surprised if I could actually get a full schedule asking for something like this.

Bels
26-02-2008, 23:07
Problem is . how many teachers are around long enough to complete a full course with their students. A student needs 90 hours at least to complete a full course level. They say between 90- 120 hours.

How many students get teachers of whom they have known for more than a year?

AstraTeaching
27-02-2008, 01:18
All the posts have been very helpful, thank you:)
I have started with all my students in October and hope to see majority of them through May (that's when we leave). However, I still have three students that just don't fit into my new schedule and I will have to pass them to somebody else.
I will post one request tomorrow evening, since I have to turn the person down due to the lack of time.
The interesting thing, though, is the following: the artisan friend of mine in Paris always asks her customers - how did they find her?
If they came on the recommendation of one of her friends, she insists on taking the person out to dinner or gives something small as a thank-you gift.
If I get a student on somebody's recommendation I always do the same.

Seems like people don't act in this manner here. Am I wrong?

smchilds
27-02-2008, 09:13
I think showing gratitude to friends is normal everywhere. I am sure that if one of my friends did me a favor, for example found a student for me who fits my schedule/location perfectly, I would do something out of gratitude. But I think, again, that if you are finding a new teacher for your student, the person you are helping is really the student, not the teacher.
Why don't teachers keep students for a long time? I guess the main issue is how long the teacher is going to stay in Moscow (if s/he is a good teacher). I have been teaching most of my current students since 2006, and it seems that a lot of my students want me to teach them for the rest of their lives :P (Though I think it's better for the student to have different teachers, not the same teacher forever.)

Bels
27-02-2008, 12:26
I suppose if a teacher has developed a small business that's worth a good weekly incme to private a teacher, then it would worth selling for a price.especially id the tudents ar all in the same area and come to you.

Any teacher can get bits and pieces in no time, especilly natives who are increasingly in short supply.

The other problem might be on passing on these student is what kind f a fee are they used to paying.

SalTheReturn
27-02-2008, 15:40
All the posts have been very helpful, thank you:)
I have started with all my students in October and hope to see majority of them through May (that's when we leave). However, I still have three students that just don't fit into my new schedule and I will have to pass them to somebody else.
I will post one request tomorrow evening, since I have to turn the person down due to the lack of time.
The interesting thing, though, is the following: the artisan friend of mine in Paris always asks her customers - how did they find her?
If they came on the recommendation of one of her friends, she insists on taking the person out to dinner or gives something small as a thank-you gift.
If I get a student on somebody's recommendation I always do the same.

Seems like people don't act in this manner here. Am I wrong?

you wanna a date in exchange of students?:rasta:

Bels
27-02-2008, 18:35
Sal, get back to the cafe where you belong. Perhaps expat. ru will make a Sal's cafe folder just for you, to keep you away from here.

ezik
27-02-2008, 18:56
Sal, get back to the cafe where you belong. Perhaps expat. ru will make a Sal's cafe folder just for you, to keep you away from here.

That would be a bit too much really...

But point taken.


This folder is meant for discussions amongst professionals. So if you're participating in a discussion, I think it is fair to ask and get an honest answer about what subject you teach. "Lifecoach" is not good enough.

Please respect the people discussing their professions here.

Bels
27-02-2008, 23:33
That was my point Ezik. I have been tolerant in the past, but listening to the serious ones on this folder, publicly and privately they don't want the interference. Therefore it's a go for the majority.

Some have asked for a teacher's section where there might be a locked section. That is a section where a separate password could be entered only for those who apply as teachers.

In one way I think it's a good idea , because the idea of teachers making their own place will never last. because there will be no continuity,as they will come and go, meaning that they will disappear each year only to go to another country or go home for a more stable and better paid profession. That is why it's Expat.ru that should do something about it, as I assume you, expat.ru are going to be around for many years yet.

Another option is to leave it the way it is, and let the teachers talk. if they have a complaint of interference of which they wish to complain about, then they should press the alarm button on the top right hand corner.

And rather than criticise me, simply give us positive ideas on how we can this folder a site for teachers. Let's work together on this one. Positive critisms are most welcome.