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quincy
12-09-2014, 09:46
NATO at the heart of a new Cold War, says former Ambassador

By James Bissett

Defence Watch Guest Writer

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was meant to be a purely defensive organization. When the Brussels Treaty of 1948 established the European Defence Alliance of five European countries, it was Canada’s Minister of Foreign affairs, Louis St. Laurent, who proposed the alliance be expanded to include the United States and Canada.

One year later, in April 1949, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was born. The primary purpose of the new organization was to defend member states from any attack from the Soviet Union and to act in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations.

NATO was born in the aftermath of the Second World War. Its founders were painfully aware that having reached the mid-point of the 20th century there had already been two world wars and the dropping of the atom bomb on civilian cities. They were determined that war and violence should not become the norm in resolving disputes and it was in this spirit that Article I of the treaty was conceived.

Article I of the Treaty made this abundantly clear. It read:

“The parties undertake, as set out forth in the Charter of the United Nations, to settle any international dispute in which they may be involved, by peaceful means in such a manner that international peace and security and justice are not endangered… and to refrain from the threat or use of force in any manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations.”

For fifty years NATO was successful in deterring aggression against the West. A combination of conventional forces and the nuclear bomb created a mutual understanding that armed conflict between the two opposing powers was not an option. Critically important, however, was Article I itself because it was a guarantee to the Soviet Union that it would never be attacked by NATO forces. Article I acted as a safety blanket for the Soviets.

Ironically, the fall of the Soviet empire did not foretell the beginning of a new age of peace and security in Europe. On the contrary, the empire’s demise caused a crisis in NATO. After the Warsaw Pact armies had returned home what was the justification of maintaining such an expensive and powerful military force in Europe. NATO’s response was – business as usual- a continuation of the Cold war. As the respected former United States Ambassador to Moscow, George F Kennan wrote in 1987…”Were the Soviet Union, to sink tomorrow under the waters of the ocean, the American military industrial complex would have to remain substantially unchanged until some other adversary could be invented. Anything else would be an unacceptable shock to the American economy.” Until his death Kennan continued to deplore NATO’s hostile encirclement of Russia.

In fact, NATO didn’t have to find another adversary it just pretended nothing had changed and acted accordingly. NATO’s behaviour towards Russia speaks for itself; a record marked by duplicity, double standards and hypocrisy. One of its first acts was to convert the Alliance from a purely defensive organization to one that could intervene militarily to resolve international disputes by force. The opportunity for this transformation occurred with the 78 day bombing of Serbia in March 1999 carried out by NATO without authorization from the UN Security Council. Later, in violation of UN Resolution 1244 reaffirming Serbia’s sovereignty over Kosovo, NATO recognized the unilateral declaration of Kosovo independence – declared without any pretence of a referendum.

During the bombing on NATO’s 50th birthday, US President Bill Clinton announced a new role for NATO – from now he declared, in effect, that NATO could intervene wherever and whenever it decided to do so. Article I of the treaty presumably had been nullified by Presidential decree. The NATO treaty had been turned upside down. In the same month NATO admitted Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic into NATO thus breaking the promise made to Russian president Mikhail Gorbachev that if Russia allowed a united Germany into NATO the organization would never expand eastward.

The current crisis in Ukraine threatens global security and at worst has the potential for nuclear catastrophe. At best it signals a continuation of the Cold War. Sadly, the crisis is completely unnecessary and the responsibility lies entirely in the hands of the United States – led NATO powers. The almost virulent propaganda onslaught blaming Russia for the instability and violence in Ukraine simply ignores reality and the facts.

NATO, spurred on by the United States, has been determined since the collapse of the Soviet Union to surround Russia with hostile NATO members. The first attempt to win Ukraine over to the West through the Orange Revolution in 2004 failed but NATO kept trying and now has “let slip the dogs of war” on that unfortunate country.

It was inevitable that NATO’s expansion eastward would at some point run into hostile Russian reaction. The attack on South Ossetia in 2008 by the US armed and trained Georgian military was the last straw and Russia finally showed its teeth and crushed the Georgian offensive in 48 hours. The Russians then added insult to injury by recognizing the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia. President Putin had warned that the illegal recognition of Kosovo independence would set a dangerous precedent and endanger the international framework of peace and security. Obviously his warning was unheeded and now the Cold War has started again. This was not supposed to happen.

It is time for the citizenry of the NATO countries to demand that the principles contained in the original NATO treaty be honoured and that Article I be followed. Bellicose statements, sanctions and other warlike moves (however futile) are not helpful in reaching a peaceful solution. NATO’s Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen should stop threatening Russia and instead reaffirm to the world that Article 1 of the treaty will be enforced.

(James Bissett is a former Canadian diplomat. He was Canada’s ambassador to Yugoslavia, Albania, and Bulgaria)
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/nato-at-the-heart-of-a-new-cold-war-says-former-ambassador

quincy
13-09-2014, 00:30
Daniel Zubov

As President Obama prepares for his address at the NATO Summit in Wales and for chairing the United Nations Security Council in September, the children of Zbignew Brzezinski, the aging anti-Russian strategist who advised President Obama during his first campaign, have been actively working to implement his Cold War schemes.

While Zbigniew has held no official role in President Obama’s administration, his son Mark, who served on President Clinton’s National Security Council as Advisor for Russia and Eurasian Affairs, has been Ambassador to Sweden since his confirmation on November, 11, 2011. From 1999 to 2001, he served as a director at the National Security Council, where he coordinated inter-agency policy formulation and advised the President and the National Security Advisor on issues relating to Russia, Eurasia, the Balkans and NATO.

Ambassador Mark Brzezinski has used his position to urge Sweden to join NATO, appearing at an Atlantic Council event in March to commend Sweden’s integration into NATO’s military forces, and pointing out to the Swedish media in April that the renewed Russian threat should justify increased defense budgets, as NATO or American support is not completely guaranteed.

Despite not being a full member, the Swedish military has participated in several coordinated NATO exercises this year. In March, fourteen hundred Swedish troops participated in Cold Response, a bi-annual drill hosted by Norway which simulates NATO responding to a hypothetical conflict between a government and separatists after a natural disaster.

In October 2013, Swedish troops participated alongside the NATO countries, Finland, and Ukraine in Operation Steadfast Jazz, to “train and test the NATO Response Force, a highly ready and technologically advanced multinational force made up of land, air, maritime and Special Forces components that the Alliance can deploy quickly wherever needed.”

In June, 2014, Swedish troops participated in two major exercises: Flaming Sword, based in Lithuania, and the 42nd annual BALTOPS drill, where 13 nations from around the Baltic and North Sea (plus the Republic of Georgia) practiced “air, surface, subsurface, and mine warfare, where the participants conducted “advance information sharing, crucial to maintaining regional stability and maritime security in the region.”

Zbigniew Brzezinski’s other son, Ian, is currently a member of the Strategic Advisors Group of the Atlantic Council, a pro-NATO lobbying organization created in 1961. From 2006 – 2011 he worked with CIA and NSA-contractor Booz Allen Hamilton and from 2001 to 2005, served as President George W. Bush’s Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Europe and NATO Policy. From 1986 - 1987 he worked at the National Security Council, and from 1991-1993, he was on the Policy Planning staff of the Defense Department.

On August 14, 2014 Ian co-authored “NATO’s Crucial Summit” for CNN, where he openly advocated escalating the violence in the region, writing, “the alliance should be prepared to provide Ukraine lethal military assistance, including anti-tank weapons and surface to air missiles, and to deploy intelligence platforms to improve the situational awareness of Ukrainian security forces and military trainers. The alliance should also resume military exercises with Ukraine to help train its armed forces.”

The first time Ian had publicly sought to compel NATO to take a hostile stance towards Russia alongside Ukraine’s new government was in his March 24 Washington Post piece, entitled “Three ways NATO can bolster Ukraine’s security.” In addition to approving lethal weapon transfers and increasing training exercises, he suggested reminding Russians of their role in Afghanistan - perhaps forgetting the blowback from America’s decision to arm and train Islamist Mujahedeen soldiers.

Zbigniew’s last child, his daughter Mika, hosts a morning political gossip show on MSNBC with former right-wing Republican Congressman Joe Scarborough. When not speaking about her cozy relationship with administration officials, she has provided a platform for neo-conservative policy architect William Kristol to call for another war in Iraq, as she did on June 17. In May, Mika and Joe even presented the Republicans with the opportunity to fraudulently attack President Obama and Hillary Clinton over Benghazi.

Zbignew himself has been quite busy. In addition to teaching American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies and Co-chairing the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Advisory Board, this year Zbigniew himself has written several columns, appeared at a conference at Princeton’s Wilson Center entitled “Confronting Russian Chauvinism” and testified in January and July to Congress about events in Ukraine, where he spoke of Putin “exalt[ing] in his military seizure of Crimea while basking in an orgy of unleashed chauvinistic sentiments.”

On May 2nd, Zbigniew wrote a piece for Politico magazine entitled “What Obama Should Tell Americans About Ukraine,” where he suggests turning Ukraine into a permanent urban battlefield, writing, “the Ukrainians will fight only if they think they will eventually get some help from the West, particularly in supplies of the kind of weaponry that will be necessary to wage a successful urban defense.”

While Obama never gave the particular speech Mr. Brzezinski wrote, he did speak on the issue on July 29 when he announced the second round of sanctions against the Russian arms, energy, and banking sectors. However, the language President Obama uses to discuss sovereignty and territorial integrity has closely mirrored Zbigniew’s suggestions.

Zbignew, who served as President Carter’s National Security Advisor from 1977-1981, was raised by his anti-Russian father, Tadeusz Brzezinski (1896 – 1990), who fought the Soviet Red Army in the final Warsaw campaign of 1920 and later was Consul General in the German city of Leipzig in 1931-1935.

Zbigniew also married into a legendary family of anti-Russian politicians: his wife, Emilie Beneš, was the grand-daughter Czech politician Vojta Beneš (1878-1951), brother of former Czechoslovak Prime Minister Eduard Beneš (1884-1948). Beneš was Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia before WWII, in exile, and then after the war. Beneš was overthrown in 1948 after he tried to bring Czechoslovakia into America’s Marshall Plan, a project to consolidate anti-Soviet power in Europe.

The Brzezinski clan’s activity in the State Department, media, and pro-NATO lobbying organizations make it certain that their family tradition of Russophobia will play a key role in the way the American government plans and executes its aggressive policy towards Russia

Daniel Zubov for The Center for International Journalism and Research, Rossiya Segodnya

Uncle Wally
13-09-2014, 01:15
Look they ain't listening and nobody cares.


We know they lie, we know they kill but it's just easier to hide and cower.

Please don't shut off our TV and take our popcorn away, we'll be good promise we will.