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Bels
07-01-2008, 19:41
Fill in the missing word from this famous phrase or proverb... For those who use English as a second language, students or teachers. It should be too easy for natives but perhaps you might discuss the meanings when the results are given. Greenies for the one who gets them all correct.


What one knows it is sometimes useful to ______.

A man may lead a horse to water, but cannot make him ______.

You're a stick-in-the-_______________.


Sal and clean32 are always giving each other _________

Hold your ______.

There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the ______ is always the same. View


You're barking up the wrong ______.


You can't teach an old dog new ______.

You're making a ______ out of a molehill.

Good things come to he who ______.

No ______ like the present.

Philippa
07-01-2008, 20:06
Your barking up the wrong ______.


Shouldn't that be "You're"?

SalTheReturn
07-01-2008, 20:20
it is also stupid that bels thought non natives know their national proverbs...this is more difficult than having to decide when using or omitting the article in english

but the most difficult thing in english is the following

sometimes you gotta use the genitive and saying stuff like "Harri's bar"
sometimes you can just say "student career" where student is used as a normal adjective

how to recognize when it is genitive and when it is adjective? impossible, you gotta feel the language fort hat

sal

Korotky Gennady
07-01-2008, 20:38
What one knows it is sometimes useful to Sal.

A man may lead a horse to water, but cannot make him piss.

You're a stick-in-the-assh..le.


Sal and clean32 are always giving each other sweet shit

Hold your mouth shut up... motherfaka !

There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the boulder above your grave is always the same. View


Your barking up the wrong tree.


You can't teach an old dog new pissing tricks.

You're making a mountain out of a molehill.

Good things come to he who is dead long ago. ( maybe this last one is just about me... )

No shit like the present.

:fireworks: :fireworks: :fireworks:

Thank you Bels ! Did I cope with your task successfully ?

Korotky Gennady
07-01-2008, 20:42
it is also stupid that bels thought non natives know their national proverbs...this is more difficult than having to decide when using or omitting the article in english

but the most difficult thing in english is the following

sometimes you gotta use the genitive and saying stuff like "Harri's bar"
sometimes you can just say "student career" where student is used as a normal adjective

how to recognize when it is genitive and when it is adjective? impossible, you gotta feel the language fort hat

sal

What is this "genitive" ?

alterego
07-01-2008, 20:51
. . .

What one knows it is sometimes . . .

???
Bels if you keep this up you're likely to be banned as a teacher.

Bels
07-01-2008, 21:03
Shouldn't that be "You're"?

Read again idiot! and it wasn't edited.

Bels
07-01-2008, 21:06
it is also stupid that bels thought non natives know their national proverbs...this is more difficult than having to decide when using or omitting the article in english

but the most difficult thing in english is the following

sometimes you gotta use the genitive and saying stuff like "Harri's bar"
sometimes you can just say "student career" where student is used as a normal adjective

how to recognize when it is genitive and when it is adjective? impossible, you gotta feel the language fort hat

sal

Believe me, natives will find this easy. And Korotky has yet again outdone you Sal, and I bet he's not going for an English degree.

Bels
07-01-2008, 21:07
???
Bels if you keep this up you're likely to be banned as a teacher.

Okay, perhaps you can correct it and add the missing word. May I remind you that they are phrases or famous quotes.

Philippa
07-01-2008, 21:12
Read again idiot! and it wasn't edited.

I'm not sure where the hostility comes from Bels, I sent you greens explaining just to make sure you knew my intentions were honorable (thanks for the unsigned reds in their place), I apologise for offending you and have no idea where your aggression comes from.

Just to clarify, you wrote:

"Your barking up the wrong ______ "

I always thought it was "You're barking up the wrong ____"

You're = You are

Your = possession, making barking a noun (gerund) so it doesn't make sense unless it goes

"Your barking is up the wrong _____" but as that isn't the phrase (I will leave out the missing word so that this fun quiz isn't ruined for everyone) I thought you'd like to know that you'd made a spelling error.

I am shocked by your hostile reaction to a simple observation. In your position I would have been grateful that someone had pointed out an error so that my reputation as an English teacher wouldn't be tarnished.

Korotky Gennady
07-01-2008, 21:12
Read again idiot! and it wasn't edited.


Really he looks so...

Bels
07-01-2008, 21:12
What one knows it is sometimes useful to Sal.

A man may lead a horse to water, but cannot make him piss.

You're a stick-in-the-assh..le.


Sal and clean32 are always giving each other sweet shit

Hold your mouth shut up... motherfaka !

There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the boulder above your grave is always the same. View


Your barking up the wrong tree.


You can't teach an old dog new pissing tricks.

You're making a mountain out of a molehill.

Good things come to he who is dead long ago. ( maybe this last one is just about me... )

No shit like the present.

:fireworks: :fireworks: :fireworks:

Thank you Bels ! Did I cope with your task successfully ?

The only decent post so far :) The rest were idiots. Apparently I have to spread my reputations to others for the moment, but you will get a greenie later.

Korotky Gennady
07-01-2008, 21:16
Okay, perhaps you can correct it and add the missing word. May I remind you that they are phrases or famous quotes.


Its strange... it seems to me as the absolute right frase." What one knows it is sometimes useful to ... "

Bels
07-01-2008, 21:24
My apologies, I must have been barking up the wrong tree. It's sal's fault as usual :) He wound me up :) He's always giving me stick !!! Just fill in the missing words :)


I'm not sure where the hostility comes from Bels, I sent you greens explaining just to make sure you knew my intentions were honorable (thanks for the unsigned reds in their place), I apologise for offending you and have no idea where your aggression comes from.

Just to clarify, you wrote:

"Your barking up the wrong ______ "

I always thought it was "You're barking up the wrong ____"

You're = You are

Your = possession, making barking a noun (gerund) so it doesn't make sense unless it goes

"Your barking is up the wrong _____" but as that isn't the phrase (I will leave out the missing word so that this fun quiz isn't ruined for everyone) I thought you'd like to know that you'd made a spelling error.

I am shocked by your hostile reaction to a simple observation. In your position I would have been grateful that someone had pointed out an error so that my reputation as an English teacher wouldn't be tarnished.

Bels
07-01-2008, 21:33
it is also stupid that bels thought non natives know their national proverbs...this is more difficult than having to decide when using or omitting the article in english

but the most difficult thing in english is the following

sometimes you gotta use the genitive and saying stuff like "Harri's bar"
sometimes you can just say "student career" where student is used as a normal adjective

how to recognize when it is genitive and when it is adjective? impossible, you gotta feel the language fort hat

sal

You talk crap Sal. What did you get on your IELTS from one to nine. Three?

Philippa
07-01-2008, 22:05
My apologies, I must have been barking up the wrong tree. It's sal's fault as usual :) He wound me up :) He's always giving me stick !!! Just fill in the missing words :)
Apology accepted, especially as it was Sal's fault ;)

Hopefully the reds I received will be cancelled out by your generous greens, if you wish to send them that is :thumbsup:

Bels
07-01-2008, 22:14
Get them all correct and you might get some more greens.

Bels
07-01-2008, 22:16
Didn't you see my clues ???>

Philippa
07-01-2008, 22:16
But I'm a native....I didn't think it was allowed!

Korotky Gennady
07-01-2008, 22:23
Alterego, i know you are a native speaker too. Please don't fuss my mind what was wrong with frase which you pointed to ?

Bels
07-01-2008, 22:29
Then you're the first Brit I've ever ome aross where we have had such a misundestaning. Remind me, you will get two greens to make up for that misunderstanding. I thought you were French :)

I'm not allowed to give anymore to you for the moment, hopefully you understand the rules.

Bels
07-01-2008, 22:35
OK,time to prove sal wrong. Natives are now welcome, and please state if it was easy or not.

Philippa
07-01-2008, 23:02
Get them all correct and you might get some more greens.

More greens? I haven't received anything but reds :(

Bels
07-01-2008, 23:07
You appear to be doing pretty good to me , what 15 posts and two green bars. How on earth did you manage that. Are you a gremlin or something.

Philippa
07-01-2008, 23:08
*What one knows it is sometimes useful to forget.

A man may lead a horse to water, but cannot make him drink. (I know this as "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink")

You're a stick-in-the-mud.

Sal and clean32 are always giving each other _________ I don't think I can answer this outside of Bardak ;)

Hold your own / tongue / horses

*There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the view is always the same.

You're barking up the wrong tree.

You can't teach an old dog new tricks.

You're making a mountain out of a molehill.

Good things come to he who waits

No time like the present.




I guessed the top one. The other one with an asterisk I didn't know at all, but it had the word written after the sentence.

I can only guess at the Sal and Clean one, but I'm far too much of a lady to say it in public :rolleyes:

Philippa
07-01-2008, 23:10
You appear to be doing pretty good to me , what 15 posts and two green bars. How on earth did you manage that. Are you a gremlin or something.

Oh, sorry, I misunderstood, I thought you were going to give me greens to make up for the reds, my mistake.

Bels
07-01-2008, 23:32
Oh, sorry, I misunderstood, I thought you were going to give me greens to make up for the reds, my mistake.

I always keep my word, and incase you misundertood I can't give you anymore reds or greens for the moment. Are you a teacher or a student??

Here are the answers:

Fill in the missing word from this famous phrase or proverb...


What one knows it is sometimes useful to forget.

Well done Korotky, sal didn't even try.

A man may lead a horse to water, but cannot make him drink

You're a stick-in-the mud


Sal and clean32 are always giving each other stick

Hold your horses

There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the view is always the same.


You’re barking up the wrong tree.


You can't teach an old dog new tricks.

You're making a mountain out of a molehill.

Good things come to he who waits

Nothing like the present. or There's nothing like the present.

Philippa
07-01-2008, 23:36
Ah, ok, I see, sorry again.

I was a teacher until last year, then had a "gap" year in Moscow ;) Now I'm just having a gap....

I thought the last one was "No ____ like the present" which implied to me that the underscored bit was a whole word and not part of a word.

Bels
07-01-2008, 23:42
Ah, ok, I see, sorry again.

I was a teacher until last year, then had a "gap" year in Moscow ;) Now I'm just having a gap....

I thought the last one was "No ____ like the present" which implied to me that the underscored bit was a whole word and not part of a word.

Acceptable confusion, unless you were already familar withe phrase. I've stated this phrase many times. Accepted, answered like a native.

Philippa
07-01-2008, 23:56
Acceptable confusion, unless you were already familar withe phrase. I've stated this phrase many times. Accepted, answered like a native.
Thanks (I think? ;)) I've never heard "Nothing like the present" you learn a new thing every day! :applause:

Korotky Gennady
08-01-2008, 00:02
Ah, ok, I see, sorry again.

I was a teacher until last year, then had a "gap" year in Moscow ;) Now I'm just having a gap....

I thought the last one was "No ____ like the present" which implied to me that the underscored bit was a whole word and not part of a word.

Bels, if she is a native speaker how could it be that she knows her native proverb ?

Korotky Gennady
08-01-2008, 00:04
And unfortunently Alterego didn't come and didn't explain his note.... :vader:

Miracle77777
08-01-2008, 00:42
Really he looks so...

???????
Hey, guys!!!!
It is a woman!!!!!!!!
Is it so difficult to check public profile at first??!!:duhhhh:

Miracle77777
08-01-2008, 00:50
Sorry....:groan:
in process of reading I can see,,that you already aware of that.....but still - it is better to check PP before posting :agree:

Philippa
08-01-2008, 01:05
Bels, if she is a native speaker how could it be that she knows her native proverb ?

KG, I don't really understand this post, but I will try to reply, forgive me if I assume the wrong meaning.

I am a native speaker, but I have never heard the phrase "nothing like the present", I have only ever heard "No time like the present". Bels says he has used the former phrase often, but I have never heard it before, so I have learned a new phrase today. I was also uncertain of the 2 asterisked answers I gave - showing that there are a lot of phrases in English and you can't know all of them, even if you are a native!

Margo
08-01-2008, 01:14
really it is impossible to know every proverb, it happens that we use sayings of the same meaning but of different form. And one is widely used in London and another - in Manchester. :)

Could anybody give examples of such proverbs?

Lady Marmalade
08-01-2008, 02:09
I know it as "No time like the present." too. I have never heard the other usage. However, learn something new everyday I guess.


Anyway, I know them as the following and would have filled them in as so on a quiz...


A man may lead a horse to water, but cannot make him ______. DRINK

And I know is as "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink."
You're a stick-in-the-_______________. MUD


Sal and clean32 are always giving each other _________. HELL However, my goodness we could have fun with the images conjured up by that one!

Hold your ______. HORSES. TONGUE.

There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the ______ is always the same. VIEW

Your barking up the wrong ______. TREE "You're barking up the wrong tree!"


You can't teach an old dog new ______. TRICKS

You're making a ______ out of a molehill. MOUNTAIN

Good things come to he who ______. "Good things come to those who wait." is what I know this one as.

No ______ like the present. TIME

Korotky Gennady
08-01-2008, 02:20
I know it as "No time like the present." too. I have never heard the other usage. However, learn something new everyday I guess.


Anyway, I know them as the following and would have filled them in as so on a quiz...


A man may lead a horse to water, but cannot make him ______. DRINK

And I know is as "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink."
You're a stick-in-the-_______________. MUD


Sal and clean32 are always giving each other _________. HELL However, my goodness we could have fun with the images conjured up by that one!

Hold your ______. HORSES. TONGUE.

There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the ______ is always the same. VIEW

Your barking up the wrong ______. TREE "You're barking up the wrong tree!"


You can't teach an old dog new ______. TRICKS

You're making a ______ out of a molehill. MOUNTAIN

Good things come to he who ______. "Good things come to those who wait." is what I know this one as.

No ______ like the present. TIME

You are late as always. I have answered all these questions before you and you could just use my ready answers... And make a point that I am not native speaker and i even didn't study english in the school... girl. And my loved teacher here Bels confirmed that my answers were the best among others. :bong:

Korotky Gennady
08-01-2008, 02:25
there are a lot of phrases in English and you can't know all of them, even if you are a native!

You can. I think that it's impossible to find a russian who doesn't know our native proverbs. And besides of it... I like " nothing but the present' much more than " no time but present". There is more taste in the version of the proverb which Bels offered to us.

Lady Marmalade
08-01-2008, 02:25
You are late as always. I have answered all these questions before you and you could just use my ready answers... And make a point that I am not native speaker and i even didn't study english in the school... girl. And my loved teacher here Bels confirmed that my answers were the best among others. :bong:


LOL! As long as I'm late for stuff like this and not "womanly" issues, then all is right with the world! Sometimes it's good to be late.

It's my "beloved" teacher Bels, not loved and I'm sure your answers were the best in terms of creativity and humour as I did already read them.

Korotky Gennady
08-01-2008, 02:32
Maybe for you... he is "beloved" but for me... he is "loved' !!!

He is the one and only man here who teaches me english...

Korotky Gennady
08-01-2008, 02:36
And it's amusing that .. (sensured)... Sal doesn't appreciate it...

Lady Marmalade
08-01-2008, 03:04
Maybe for you... he is "beloved" but for me... he is "loved' !!!

He is the one and only man here who teaches me english...

Fair enough. So be it. :thumbsup:

Philippa
08-01-2008, 04:52
You can. I think that it's impossible to find a russian who doesn't know our native proverbs. And besides of it... I like " nothing but the present' much more than " no time but present". There is more taste in the version of the proverb which Bels offered to us.

I'm glad you like Bels' version and it's nice to see such loyalty, but I have never heard it before (and neither has Fari). Some phrases change from region to region (as Margo pointed out) so maybe it's just that Bels' version is from the north, for example, and mine and Fari's from the south and Canada. I Googled the 2 phrases and Google indeed also favours the version I know, but English is hugely varied and is always changing, which is what makes it such an expressive and diverse language ;)

Clean32
08-01-2008, 05:08
I'm glad you like Bels' version and it's nice to see such loyalty, but I have never heard it before (and neither has Fari). Some phrases change from region to region (as Margo pointed out) so maybe it's just that Bels' version is from the north, for example, and mine and Fari's from the south and Canada. I Googled the 2 phrases and Google indeed also favours the version I know, but English is hugely varied and is always changing, which is what makes it such an expressive and diverse language ;)

Yeppa just like :Good things come to he who ______. "Good things come to those who wait." is what I know this one as."

Bels giving an older more traditional version, you giving the PC version

alterego
08-01-2008, 07:54
First I'll say that I'm not familar with the phrase but the grammar just seems wrong. Perhaps it is some sort of idomatic expression and I just don't know it,
But I suspect that it is just wrong.

What one knows it is better to . . .

'what one knows' = subject
'it' (seems to =) subject

A double subject doesn't work.

"John is big."
that's fine

"John he is big"
is garbage, substituting 'he' for 'john' would be
"He he is big"

"John? He is big."
"John! He is big."
these are fine

I suspect that the correct grammar is
"What one knows is best forgotten."

Now we have a single subject used in the passive, (due to the word order)
If you don't want to use the passive then the word order should be changed

"It is better to forget what one knows."
which is understood to mean
"It is better to forget what one knows than to remember it."

Again perhaps this is a customary phrase like
"I don't want no coffee."
Grammatically wrong but understandable to those who are familiar with it.

alterego
08-01-2008, 08:02
Having just run this through my mind so much another possibility occurred to me.

"It is better to forget what one knows"
could be put into a non-standard form of the object first to give it a poetic flare,
"What one knows, it is better to forget."
Of course the comma is very important here to let the reader know what you are doing. If the reader is very familiar with the phrase I guess they would do this for you. I'm not familiar with the phrase so I didn't.
In spoken English there would be a definite, if not dramatic, pause where the comma is.

Clean32
08-01-2008, 08:57
thou has't not read thy King James.




First I'll say that I'm not familar with the phrase but the grammar just seems wrong. Perhaps it is some sort of idomatic expression and I just don't know it,
But I suspect that it is just wrong.

What one knows it is better to . . .

'what one knows' = subject
'it' (seems to =) subject

A double subject doesn't work.

"John is big."
that's fine

"John he is big"
is garbage, substituting 'he' for 'john' would be
"He he is big"

"John? He is big."
"John! He is big."
these are fine

I suspect that the correct grammar is
"What one knows is best forgotten."

Now we have a single subject used in the passive, (due to the word order)
If you don't want to use the passive then the word order should be changed

"It is better to forget what one knows."
which is understood to mean
"It is better to forget what one knows than to remember it."

Again perhaps this is a customary phrase like
"I don't want no coffee."
Grammatically wrong but understandable to those who are familiar with it.

alterego
08-01-2008, 09:35
thou has't not read thy King James.

Yes I have. I even know how to spell 'hast'.

Bels
08-01-2008, 11:15
Let's try a few more :) Hopefully with a little more politeness from our know all natives??



It was just a ______ in the pan.

A ______ in the hand is worth two in the bush.

Put your money where your ______ is.

The ______ of a pretty girl can be heard further than the roar of a lion.

Philippa
08-01-2008, 12:18
Let's try a few more :) Hopefully with a little more politeness from our know all natives??

And hopefully with a little more politeness from our teacher. ;)

I assume from the tone of this post that you would rather the "know all natives" keep out of it.

Thanks for the first set of greens by the way, you are indeed a man of your word. :thumbsup:

Bels
08-01-2008, 12:31
And hopefully with a little more politeness from our teacher. ;)

I assume from the tone of this post that you would rather the "know all natives" keep out of it.

Thanks for the first set of greens by the way, you are indeed a man of your word. :thumbsup:

And reading all your previous posts again, a sense of sarcasm I think?? :)

What do you think gang?? after my obligation is over, should I send the gremlin to the firing sqaud of ten kalashnikovs and have him peppered. :)

Korotky Gennady
08-01-2008, 12:47
Having just run this through my mind so much another possibility occurred to me.

"It is better to forget what one knows"
could be put into a non-standard form of the object first to give it a poetic flare,
"What one knows, it is better to forget."
Of course the comma is very important here to let the reader know what you are doing. If the reader is very familiar with the phrase I guess they would do this for you. I'm not familiar with the phrase so I didn't.
In spoken English there would be a definite, if not dramatic, pause where the comma is.

Alterego, of course I meant just that when i said that you confused me...

Philippa
08-01-2008, 13:03
And reading all your previous posts again, a sense of sarcasm I think?? :)

What do you think gang?? after my obligation is over, should I send the gremlin to the firing sqaud of ten kalashnikovs and have him peppered. :)

No sarcasm from me, apologies if my posts came across like that.

Not sure why you feel you have to call me a gremlin and the threat of having me shot is frankly scary and I'm female by the way. I really don't understand your hostility towards me, I have been nothing but polite, even after you launched into me calling me an idiot and a gremlin.

Bels
08-01-2008, 13:21
No sarcasm from me, apologies if my posts came across like that.

Not sure why you feel you have to call me a gremlin and the threat of having me shot is frankly scary and I'm female by the way. I really don't understand your hostility towards me, I have been nothing but polite, even after you launched into me calling me an idiot and a gremlin.

Look at your avater, what is it???? A teddy bear????? Keep being nice and I might believe you. :)

My disbelief of you being British native is this misunderstanding of each other that we keep having. I thought only sal could do that to me.

Philippa
08-01-2008, 13:31
Look at your avater, what is it???? A teddy bear????? Keep being nice and I might believe you. :)

My disbelief of you being British native is this misunderstanding of each other that we keep having. I thought only sal could do that to me.

The avatar is my faithful mutt, Oz. Wonderful isn't he? He is something of a teddy bear and the kindest (maddest) hound you're ever likely to meet. He's a real character.

I'm not sure what the misunderstanding is that you keep referring to, or have I misunderstood that you just threatened to have me shot and called me an idiot and a gremlin?

I was born in England but I have been living in France for 8 years, although I'm not sure what my nationality has to do with anything.

I still don't understand your hostility.

Bels
08-01-2008, 13:44
I'm not sure where the hostility comes from Bels, I sent you greens explaining just to make sure you knew my intentions were honorable (thanks for the unsigned reds in their place), I apologise for offending you and have no idea where your aggression comes from.

Just to clarify, you wrote:

"Your barking up the wrong ______ "

I always thought it was "You're barking up the wrong ____"

You're = You are

Your = possession, making barking a noun (gerund) so it doesn't make sense unless it goes

"Your barking is up the wrong _____" but as that isn't the phrase (I will leave out the missing word so that this fun quiz isn't ruined for everyone) I thought you'd like to know that you'd made a spelling error.

I am shocked by your hostile reaction to a simple observation. In your position I would have been grateful that someone had pointed out an error so that my reputation as an English teacher wouldn't be tarnished.


Let's sort it out like adults. This is where it all started, and I can't find any hostility to you from this point. I know full well the difference between Your and you're and I have over a 1,000 posts to prove it.

But it wasn't what I was asking, all I wanted was for students to fill in the missing without someone coming up with something so minor and irrelevent.
These quizes normally go smoothly and friendly, but not this one unfortunately.

Bels
08-01-2008, 13:46
And if you had seen The Gremlins film, you would know what I was talking about.

Philippa
08-01-2008, 13:53
I'm sorry for upsetting you by correcting you - but I seriously thought that if you were setting a quiz for non-native speakers it was difficult enough as it was without having errors in there. As the you're/your confusion is common in people learning English it seemed obvious to me that it should be corrected.

At no point was it a personal attack on you, I was genuinely trying to draw your attention to what was obviously an error, at no point did I think you were confused by the your/you're thing, you're a teacher of English, of course you would know the difference.

Then you called me an idiot and told me to look again, so you seemed to have not understood what I was trying to point out. That is when I had to explain in detail so that you could see where the error was.

You have since apologised so I thought the matter was over, I am sorry if I have upset you by pointing out your mistake, it was an innocent correction and only there for the sake of the non-native speakers who might have been confused by it.

Philippa
08-01-2008, 13:54
And if you had seen The Gremlins film, you would know what I was talking about.

I have seen the Gremlins film (the first one anyway, although it was a long time ago) but I still don't see how that leads to your calling me a gremlin and threatening to have me shot.

Philippa
08-01-2008, 14:45
You can. I think that it's impossible to find a russian who doesn't know our native proverbs. And besides of it... I like " nothing but the present' much more than " no time but present". There is more taste in the version of the proverb which Bels offered to us.

This is educational don't you think? Good thread Bels.

As I hadn't heard of Bels' "Nothing like the present" I thought I would look it up and improve my knowledge of British phrases.

I found this for "No time like the present":
No time like the present - UsingEnglish.com (http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/no+time+like+the+present.html)

Unfortunately I couldn't find anything for "Nothing like the present"

Usually when creating a cloze test there are certain rules to abide by, one of which is that the "gap" should represent a whole word, if not there should be a hyphen to let the reader know that it is only part of a word, or better still the whole word "nothing" should have been represented by the gap.

I think that's where the confusion lay.

Bels
08-01-2008, 14:54
Cool Quiz! Trivia, Quizzes, Puzzles, Jokes, Useless Knowledge, FUN! (http://www.coolquiz.com/quizzes/Phrases/index.asp?action=newgame)

Enjoy the source of the quiz.

Bels
08-01-2008, 14:58
This is educational don't you think? Good thread Bels.

As I hadn't heard of Bels' "Nothing like the present" I thought I would look it up and improve my knowledge of British phrases.

I found this for "No time like the present":
No time like the present - UsingEnglish.com (http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/no+time+like+the+present.html)

Unfortunately I couldn't find anything for "Nothing like the present"

Usually when creating a cloze test there are certain rules to abide by, one of which is that the "gap" should represent a whole word, if not there should be a hyphen to let the reader know that it is only part of a word, or better still the whole word "nothing" should have been represented by the gap.

I think that's where the confusion lay.


Yes I do admit I prefer There's no time like the present.

alterego
08-01-2008, 16:39
Bels, the only hostility I sense is from you. My comment was meant to be light hearted, but of course that can be difficult to show in text. Sorry if you took it too seriously.
I don't expect one to be perfect in their grammar in most conversations. However you are not making idle conversation here. You are putting forth a test. I think all would agree that you should be held to a higher standard in this case. How is one to know which error you want corrected? Blaming the source is not acceptable either, especially when the source is not originally cited.
People are always making the mistake of 'your' instead of 'you're'. I'm sure I do it myself. I'm sure a search of your posts, or anyone's for that matter, would show an abundance of this particular error. And your'e not fooling anyone by saying you didn't edit it. I saw it and it's clear from several posters on this thread that they also saw it.
And I don't think this critique is off topic considering you chose to put this thread in the Teacher's Discussion Folder.
Why don't you come to a teacher's meet up? I think you'd find everyone very friendly.

Bels
08-01-2008, 16:48
I normally find them very friendly here, I've also explained why I can't have meetings in Moscow. Teachers are normally supportive to each other whether it be on a forum or face to face.

Bels
08-01-2008, 17:23
You are off topic in this particular thread, especially when dealing with phrases. I will acept judgement from others.

Thank you for everyone for my 70 rep points, in less than 24hours. It must be a record. Only a one pointer negataive and that was it. Thank you again for your support.

MickeyTong
08-01-2008, 20:48
Olny srmat poelpe can.
cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!
if you can raed tihs psas it on

I wonder if this only applies to native speakers/fluent speakers.....

Grammar Jokes (http://www.walkupsway.com/grammar_jokes.htm)
an entertaining source

SalTheReturn
08-01-2008, 22:26
You talk crap Sal. What did you get on your IELTS from one to nine. Three?

LOL LOL

6.5 it is the minimum to get in and thats right what i got LOL LOL

Bels, how is your russian now? LOL LOL LOL

IraM
12-01-2008, 14:55
It was just a ______ in the pan.

A ______ in the hand is worth two in the bush.

Put your money where your ______ is.

The ______ of a pretty girl can be heard further than the roar of a lion.


Now back from my dacha and straight towards my PC!

1) flash - It was just a flash in the pan.
2) bird - A bird in hand is worth two in the bush.
3) mouth - Put your money where your mouth is.

The last saying is not familiar to me. I'll try to guess... Maybe whisper?

James_B
29-01-2008, 13:06
You are absolutely right! "Wisper" is the right answer here. Your intuition did not let you down.