PDA

View Full Version : Russian-French couple: name change for wife, dual citizenship for baby



Paprika AP
08-12-2013, 22:05
My sister married a Frenchman in August 2013. She hasn't changed her name officially in France because her husband has told her (her French is not very good yet) that there is no such thing as legal name change in case of marriage in France. She now signs her name everywhere as her maiden name and her husband's name (making a double name). She is now pregnant and the baby is due in June 2014. She says she has no intention of changing her name in Russia or France and will keep her Russian passport unchanged. But trhe baby will get some kind of birth certificate, right? And she will eb stated on it with a double name. What is she needs to take some legally significant actions with the baby later in Russia? Won't it make her two different people in France and in Russia? If there really no such thing as legally changing your name in France in the case of marriage? I'm confused.

Another quesiton is about the baby's citizenship. I think she should get the baby both French and Russian citizenship. Is that possible?

penka
08-12-2013, 22:23
The general rule and not only in France is that one can keep the maiden name, take the hubby's last name or take the double name. Which is registered. So, all the passes must be changed and consistent. To be on the safe side, it is good to translate and legalise the marriage certificate into the relevant language, so there will be no questions/ problems.

Your sisters' husband might be referring to this:
"In France a law was passed in 1794 that is still in effect making it illegal for any person to legally use any name other than their birth name; however cultural and social influence is so powerful, the law is completely ignored as nearly all married women in France use their husbands name."

If your sister decided on keeping her maiden name, which is her legal name, i e the one stated in the passport, she should sign the documents only with that name.

When the baby is born, the Birth Certificate is issued. Which last name the baby gets, parents can decide between themselves. The BC should be translated and legalised (at the notary - not sure if the apostille is required). Presumably, the baby is born in France: then get the BC, translate, legalise, go to ZAGS in RF, register. No problem.

Of course, the baby can get two citizenships. It is not illegal.

PS I sense there might be some major misunderstanding going on either between your sister/ her husband or between you two.

tonytony
09-12-2013, 01:18
If your sister decided on keeping her maiden name, which is her legal name, i e the one stated in the passport, she should sign the documents only with that name.

When the baby is born, the Birth Certificate is issued. Which last name the baby gets, parents can decide between themselves. The BC should be translated and legalised (at the notary - not sure if the apostille is required). Presumably, the baby is born in France: then get the BC, translate, legalise, go to ZAGS in RF, register. No problem.

Of course, the baby can get two citizenships. It is not illegal.



My children have dual British/Russian citizenship and it was no problem getting them a Russian passport. My wife also kept her maiden name when we married and did not take my name. However, we did give our daughter my name on her birth certificate and passport. As penka says above, she still signs all documents and has her bank account etc in her maiden name.

Although things may be different in France to the UK, our experience was that the Russian embassy in London first required us to get a British passport for our daughter as she also had British citizenship and we were resident in the UK at the time.

That was a lot of fun, trying to get a proper passport photo of a 6 month old baby, but we managed eventually.

Once we had the British passport, my wife then went to the Russian consulate in London and they told her that they needed the British passport and birth certificate translated into Russian and that we must use one of their accredited agencies - you cannot just use anyone.

It is important to note that the Russian consulate in London said that they would only put the same name in the Russian passport that was shown in the British passport - they do not put a patronymic if that is not shown in the British passport.

That is how things work at the Russian consulate in London. Things may be slightly different in Paris, but I guess they will be similar.





PS I sense there might be some major misunderstanding going on either between your sister/ her husband or between you two.

I sort of got that feeling as well