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VicY
18-10-2013, 19:42
I've been going through a few reading aloud and storytelling sessions with my pupils and was reminded, once again, that a great many fairy tales/nursery rhymes seem to have come from the same source, although I haven't investigated the issue in-depth.

A few examples.

"Goldilocks and the Three Bears" is an Anglophone version of the Russian "Masha and the Bears" (Маша и медведи).
"The Gingerbread Man" is a knock-off of "Kolobok" (Колобок).
"The Giant Turnip" is actually claimed to have Russian origins (Репка), the same is true of "The Little Red Hen".

Have you come across other versions of your favourite childhood stories? ;)

Jack17
18-10-2013, 19:59
Fairy Tales, since Die Grimme Märchen in the 19th Century, are a recognized art form and an important part of German and Italian literature. They, like ancient Greek and Roman myths, all convey essential cultural and psychological archetypes and many basic human truths.

Beyond the Brothers Grimm, one of the best collections is Italo Galvino's Italian Fairy Tales.

rusmeister
18-10-2013, 20:22
Hi, VicY!
You're the sort that might trouble to read this...

http://journeytothesea.com/chesterton-fairy-tales/

and then:

http://www.readprint.com/chapter-20172/Tremendous-Trifles-Gilbert-Keith-Chesterton

Not long reads. I hope you find something interesting!

finnandcork
18-10-2013, 21:35
Sinyavsky, in "Ivan the Fool" speaks about some tales in Russia that are related to others, Iranian, German etc.....but Vladimir Propp goes into depth, also Jack Zipes has more than a few essays re: the connection between certain tales. Russian magic tales, though, stand apart from nearly all others in many ways.
http://www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/rrrussian.html

Theres a very good book by Prof. Sibelan Foresster, "Wild Witch of the East", about Baba Yaga, its "eh", compared to Baba Yaga, by Andreas Johns, it just regurgitates many of Prof. Johns statements.
I apologize for meandering from your question, but Russian folk tales, their origins, relation to other cultures own skazki is one of my obsessions.

Jack17
18-10-2013, 21:36
Oh, good lord; now it's Chesterton on fairy tales.

Rus, if every subject for you is filtered through the eyes of Chesterton, then why don't you do as he did and convert to Roman Catholicism?

Your posts might be more interesting if we could discuss Hans Küng and Jesuit theologians like Jon Sobrino.

Your entire library seems to consist of late Victorian Roman Catholic apologists.

I see at last the "twins" are together.

penka
18-10-2013, 21:38
Fairy Tales, since Die Grimme Märchen in the 19th Century, are a recognized art form and an important part of German and Italian literature. They, like ancient Greek and Roman myths, all convey essential cultural and psychological archetypes and many basic human truths.

Beyond the Brothers Grimm, one of the best collections is Italo Galvino's Italian Fairy Tales.

You mean Italo Calvino?

finnandcork
18-10-2013, 21:41
Jack, I disagree; first, I could care less about Chesterton outside his literary work, I am not keen on "Catholic apologists", theological arguments....more of a "contemplative" a "poet"...most waterfalls have more to say than your average thinker.

finnandcork
18-10-2013, 21:45
You mean Italo Calvino?

Calvinos "Italian Folk Tales"....oh my.....one of the best...
Have any of you read(or reread) Lord Dunsany ...can't recall the title of the short tale but it was about "The Wild Thing" that lives in a marsh, yearns to be human, becomes a woman with a soul, works in a factory, gives her soul away to a (?) Baroness, returns to the marshes as a two foot high brown skinned sharp eared "kith of elves" and her kind come out to dance on the stars reflections....read it to my wife and daughter two nights ago, a most enchanting story, vivid.

Alan65
18-10-2013, 21:58
I've been going through a few reading aloud and storytelling sessions with my pupils and was reminded, once again, that a great many fairy tales/nursery rhymes seem to have come from the same source, although I haven't investigated the issue in-depth.

A few examples.

"Goldilocks and the Three Bears" is an Anglophone version of the Russian "Masha and the Bears" (Маша и медведи).
"The Gingerbread Man" is a knock-off of "Kolobok" (Колобок).
"The Giant Turnip" is actually claimed to have Russian origins (Репка), the same is true of "The Little Red Hen".

Have you come across other versions of your favourite childhood stories? ;)

Just about any business plan I ever put together in England, Russia or China :D

As I say to the people in my team "It is not about what is achievable, it is all about what is believable" :D

penka
18-10-2013, 22:20
Calvinos "Italian Folk Tales"....oh my.....one of the best...
Have any of you read(or reread) Lord Dunsany ...can't recall the title of the short tale but it was about "The Wild Thing" that lives in a marsh, yearns to be human, becomes a woman with a soul, works in a factory, gives her soul away to a (?) Baroness, returns to the marshes as a two foot high brown skinned sharp eared "kith of elves" and her kind come out to dance on the stars reflections....read it to my wife and daughter two nights ago, a most enchanting story, vivid.

No, never. Perhaps, I should.

They read fairy-tales to med at bedtime, but strangely enough I grew to favour The Little Prince, which I'm still very fond of.

And I love the sublime strangeness of Brothers Grimm.

Stories like Cinderella or Little (Odd) Hood went into one ear and flew through another one.

rusmeister
18-10-2013, 23:55
Oh, good lord; now it's Chesterton on fairy tales.

Rus, if every subject for you is filtered through the eyes of Chesterton, then why don't you do as he did and convert to Roman Catholicism?

Your posts might be more interesting if we could discuss Hans Küng and Jesuit theologians like Jon Sobrino.

Your entire library seems to consist of late Victorian Roman Catholic apologists.

I see at last the "twins" are together.
Jack, you are not interested in any honest interchange with me, only in debunking.
You don't give a hoot about even Jesuit theologians. I'll bet as soon as we started examining someone like Fulton Sheen, you would drop him like a hot potato. Too much truth. Too uncomfortable for the choices you have made. YOU would have to admit that the Catholic faith was deeper and more intelligent than you are willing to acknowledge.
I have nothing more to say to you.
All the best!

rusmeister
19-10-2013, 00:02
Jack, I disagree; first, I could care less about Chesterton outside his literary work, I am not keen on "Catholic apologists", theological arguments....more of a "contemplative" a "poet"...most waterfalls have more to say than your average thinker.

Maybe you didn't intend it, but calling (or implying that) Chesterton was "an average thinker" is like calling Pushkin "an average poet" or Einstein "an average scientist". It would be extreme ignorance of the breadth of his thought. It dismisses what one knows pretty much nothing about.

Jack17
19-10-2013, 00:07
I'll bet as soon as we started examining someone like Fulton Sheen, you would drop him like a hot potato.

You would be correct because Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen was no Jesuit. If he is your idea of a modern Roman Catholic thinker, then you best remain a Russian Orthodox Christian.

rusmeister
19-10-2013, 02:36
You would be correct because Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen was no Jesuit. If he is your idea of a modern Roman Catholic thinker, then you best remain a Russian Orthodox Christian.

Like I said.

Sheen IS a modern RC thinker, with an active cause for sainthood being moved forward, not "my idea" of one. What you miss, in your pedantic thrust, is that serious Jesuits do not care about proving the truth of Jesuitism, but of Catholicism.

I am aware that you will have the last word, in which you will shift your tone to reasonableness as you have done in the past, but there's no honesty in your words. You don't even care so much about your own beliefs, which you do not hold seriously, as long as you may attack mine.

I do wish you the best, anyway, but see no reason to talk to you anymore.
Goodbye!

Russian Lad
19-10-2013, 03:39
It is funny to see how the discussion of fairytales has swerves to the discussion of theology rather quickly. No wonder to me here, since the most famous fairytale is the Bible...

Jack17
19-10-2013, 04:33
Goodbye!

:wavey:

Suit yourself Rus; if I had a nickle for every time you've said you'd never speak to me again, I'd be rich as Abramovich - or maybe Metropolitan Kiril - - or both!

Anyway, Mother Theresa is also a candidate for Sainthood; but no one recognizes her as a leading Roman Church thinker; neither do they Archbishop Sheen who was a charismatic American tele-vangelist of the 50's and 60's.

annasophia
19-10-2013, 14:24
I've been going through a few reading aloud and storytelling sessions with my pupils and was reminded, once again, that a great many fairy tales/nursery rhymes seem to have come from the same source, although I haven't investigated the issue in-depth.

A few examples.

"Goldilocks and the Three Bears" is an Anglophone version of the Russian "Masha and the Bears" (Маша и медведи).
"The Gingerbread Man" is a knock-off of "Kolobok" (Колобок).
"The Giant Turnip" is actually claimed to have Russian origins (Репка), the same is true of "The Little Red Hen".

Have you come across other versions of your favourite childhood stories? ;)

I love and adore fairy tales, they are always both frightening and heart rendering all at the same time, right?

In Russia I absolutely fell in love with the Giant Turnip, it completely captured me. I have several beautiful illustrated story books of the Giant Turnip, in Russian and in English, and in Moscow I bought several painted wooden artworks from the artists depicting the story of the pulling of the Giant Turnip. They are my prized possessions.

I love the whole family from the farmer down through his children and finally the cat (it's always the cat isn't it? Russians love cats), all tugging together to hoist the giant turnip out of the ground--but I am a gardener by trade so it makes sense that this story would resonate so clearly with me.

Aside from the Russian turnip, I think my other lifelong favorites are The Girl In the Red Shoes, and The Fisherman and the Sea--both of which I have loved since childhood but never knew before that The Fisherman was Russian in origin.

Fairy tales are my favorite literature of all time. They always come with beautiful colorful illustrations, fanciful characters, and a finger wagging moral to the story.

Russians are exceptionally fine story tellers and illustrators. Just superb. Their folklore is deep and touching and ancient and beautiful. They are the masters of the genre.

!And don't forget Maslenitsa! It is Russian fairy tales come alive every spring, with vodka and pancakes and performing forest creatures. My god I love Maslenitsa, best holiday ever.

Ibanez
19-10-2013, 15:31
I love and adore fairy tales, they are always both frightening and heart rendering all at the same time, right?

In Russia I absolutely fell in love with the Giant Turnip, it completely captured me. I have several beautiful illustrated story books of the Giant Turnip, in Russian and in English, and in Moscow I bought several painted wooden artworks from the artists depicting the story of the pulling of the Giant Turnip. They are my prized possessions.

I love the whole family from the farmer down through his children and finally the cat (it's always the cat isn't it? Russians love cats), all tugging together to hoist the giant turnip out of the ground--but I am a gardener by trade so it makes sense that this story would resonate so clearly with me.

Aside from the Russian turnip, I think my other lifelong favorites are The Girl In the Red Shoes, and The Fisherman and the Sea--both of which I have loved since childhood but never knew before that The Fisherman was Russian in origin.

Fairy tales are my favorite literature of all time. They always come with beautiful colorful illustrations, fanciful characters, and a finger wagging moral to the story.

Russians are exceptionally fine story tellers and illustrators. Just superb. Their folklore is deep and touching and ancient and beautiful. They are the masters of the genre.

!And don't forget Maslenitsa! It is Russian fairy tales come alive every spring, with vodka and pancakes and performing forest creatures. My god I love Maslenitsa, best holiday ever.


Anna, thanks for bringing the topic back to where it belongs...

rusmeister
20-10-2013, 07:48
So, VicY, Anna, Ibanez, any comment on the posts I linked? (Being entirely on topic)

Benedikt
20-10-2013, 08:33
Hi, VicY!
You're the sort that might trouble to read this...

http://journeytothesea.com/chesterton-fairy-tales/

and then:

http://www.readprint.com/chapter-20172/Tremendous-Trifles-Gilbert-Keith-Chesterton

Not long reads. I hope you find something interesting!



-before- Rusmeister I never knew who Chesterton even was. And since there is such a big pro and contra about him here, I started to read up. but i quickly found out that reading up a few pages is by far not enough to understand something that is completely new and unknown to me. but at least i read..

VicY
20-10-2013, 10:05
Hi, VicY!
You're the sort that might trouble to read this...

http://journeytothesea.com/chesterton-fairy-tales/

and then:

http://www.readprint.com/chapter-20172/Tremendous-Trifles-Gilbert-Keith-Chesterton

Not long reads. I hope you find something interesting!

Thanks, Rus, I will read them in a moment...
Haven't checked back this thread for a while.

VicY
20-10-2013, 10:07
No, never. Perhaps, I should.

They read fairy-tales to med at bedtime, but strangely enough I grew to favour The Little Prince, which I'm still very fond of.

And I love the sublime strangeness of Brothers Grimm.

Stories like Cinderella or Little (Odd) Hood went into one ear and flew through another one.

I loved them all: Cinderella, The Little Prince, and the Grimm stories...They were all good to me! :D

penka
20-10-2013, 10:11
I loved them all: Cinderella, The Little Prince, and the Grimm stories...They were all good to me! :D

Do you have any favourites among the Russian ones?

VicY
20-10-2013, 10:19
No wonder to me here, since the most famous fairytale is the Bible...

Well, actually, before you scoff, all fairy tales have real life origins...They may have been modified in order to be turned into allegories, rather than telling us exactly what it was all about, but they still can be tracked back to the source.

While I don't believe that Jesus was a son of god and lots of what is being claimed about him, I am 99.9% sure that he existed. He must have been a very unusual figure then, whose philosophy sounded groundbreaking at the time. He must surely have spawned a large following and he must have suffered precisely for that.
It was much later that he was canonized and made into a kind of deity.

annasophia
20-10-2013, 10:21
So, VicY, Anna, Ibanez, any comment on the posts I linked? (Being entirely on topic)

I read the Cheston link and liked it very much. There is surely a lot of unexplained magic in the world that science takes for granted and simply devolves it into some kind of inevitable DNA mumbo jumbo. (But where did the DNA come from?)

I'm not very good at dissecting things and then debating them. It often seems so unnecessary, when you can more easily love and appreciate something wonderful rather than reverse engineer what makes it so appealing taken down to the smallest molecule and then try explain it in some kind of complex meaningless formula.

I was for years an English and art history major in college but at some point I really got fed up with all the requisite literary criticism and miniscule art categorization and walked away. I still love literature and art--the whole novel or the entire sculpture--without squeezing every tiny element for it's micro meaning, destroying the wonderfulness of the whole finished work.

VicY
20-10-2013, 10:21
Do you have any favourites among the Russian ones?

When I was little, I loved "Repka" and a tale of Emelya and the Pike.

Later on I loved "The Flying Ship" and "The Princess Frog".
Actually, there were many others too, it's hard to remember off the top of my head! :D

VicY
20-10-2013, 10:25
I'm not very good at dissecting things and then debating them. It often seems so unnecessary, when you can more easily love and appreciate something wonderful rather than reverse engineer what makes it so appealing taken down to the smallest molecule and then try explain it in some kind of complex meaningless formula.



Very well-put, Annasophia! I can't agree more...

VicY
20-10-2013, 10:35
I love and adore fairy tales, they are always both frightening and heart rendering all at the same time, right?

In Russia I absolutely fell in love with the Giant Turnip, it completely captured me. I have several beautiful illustrated story books of the Giant Turnip, in Russian and in English, and in Moscow I bought several painted wooden artworks from the artists depicting the story of the pulling of the Giant Turnip. They are my prized possessions.

I love the whole family from the farmer down through his children and finally the cat (it's always the cat isn't it? Russians love cats), all tugging together to hoist the giant turnip out of the ground--but I am a gardener by trade so it makes sense that this story would resonate so clearly with me.

Aside from the Russian turnip, I think my other lifelong favorites are The Girl In the Red Shoes, and The Fisherman and the Sea--both of which I have loved since childhood but never knew before that The Fisherman was Russian in origin.

Fairy tales are my favorite literature of all time. They always come with beautiful colorful illustrations, fanciful characters, and a finger wagging moral to the story.

Russians are exceptionally fine story tellers and illustrators. Just superb. Their folklore is deep and touching and ancient and beautiful. They are the masters of the genre.

!And don't forget Maslenitsa! It is Russian fairy tales come alive every spring, with vodka and pancakes and performing forest creatures. My god I love Maslenitsa, best holiday ever.

Yes, I love Russian folk/fairy tales!
I've always loved those collections of "....folk tales" too - Russian, European, Asian.
In the Soviet Union they used to publish collections of "Folktales from all over the world" ("Сказки народов мира"), Russian folktales ("Русские народные сказки"), Northern peoples' folk tales ("Сказки народов Севера") etc. There would have been whole libraries of similar editions in many a family. We had one like that too :D

But the most amazing thing (and I started this thread with this thought in mind) is that so many of these tales seem to have a lot in common.

As I said above, plethora of foreign fairy tales that have Russian origins, as well as the other way round.

For example, the famous fairy tale by the Grimm brothers - Snow White - was the base of Pushkin's illustrious version of it - The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights. He read the original in a French translation and then created his own poetic version of it! Isn't it amazing?

Jas
20-10-2013, 10:54
For example, the famous fairy tale by the Grimm brothers - Snow White - was the base of Pushkin's illustrious version of it - The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Knights. He read the original in a French translation and then created his own poetic version of it! Isn't it amazing?

Yes, it is amazing. Cultures move from east to west usually, like Russian numbers is the same in Sanskrit, gods of Greece was from India, and no surprise Russian stories wud go west also. Now can u c this with fairy tales also? Yes u can, so the Indian Panchantra is how Aysop got his ideas.

TolkoRaz
20-10-2013, 11:01
Aren't Fairy Tales etc universal in that they are designed to teach children about morality, the difference between good & evil etc?

rusmeister
20-10-2013, 12:42
Aren't Fairy Tales etc universal in that they are designed to teach children about morality, the difference between good & evil etc?

I wouldn't say that that is their only design by any means, but they DO accomplish that, among other things. (Cough! Ahem! Did you read the links I posted? They address that...)

Anyone who sees these aspects of fairy tales will begin to see the equation of FTs to lies and silly falsehoods for what it is - blind ignorance. (RL decided to take and ever so slightly tweak something I said (minus the context, of course) and made it his signature for that very purpose.)

Jack17
20-10-2013, 20:04
Anna, thanks for bringing the topic back to where it belongs...
You know, after years of posting, I'm always baffled and slightly irritated at this high handed treatment of online thread topics.

Expat.ru forums are not online college credit courses. Is any of this discussion different from the kind of informal conversation people have at parties or other gatherings of friends and acquaintances? Can anyone imagine being gathered in a group of 5 or 6 people at a party where someone says, "Could we please return this discussion back to where it belongs . . . " I think the response to such a comment would be blank stares.

Beyond that, Fairy Tales have everything to do with morality and hence religion. Tolka is correct; Fairy Tales are an expression of secular morality most often directed to children but with beauty and truth for everyone. The same can be said for religion.

finnandcork
20-10-2013, 21:06
Russian Magic Tales from Pushkin to Platonov (Penguin Classics): Robert Chandler, Elizabeth Chandler, Sibelan Forrester, Anna Gunin, Olga Meerson: 9780141442235: Amazon.com: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YyjI0LAjL.@@AMEPARAM@@51YyjI0LAjL

We just picked this up, well, a couple moons ago, very nice selection, especially folk tales by Platonov and the Teffi Baba Yaga is worth the entire collection.

robertmf
21-10-2013, 02:14
Baba Yaga (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/ftr/chap06.htm) and other folk tales.

penka
21-10-2013, 09:27
Beyond that, Fairy Tales have everything to do with morality and hence religion. Tolka is correct; Fairy Tales are an expression of secular morality most often directed to children but with beauty and truth for everyone. The same can be said for religion.

I have trouble understanding the highlighted characteristics, Jack. Care to explain?

On a general note, I'd rather think, folk fairy-tales are very much archetype-based and therefore universal. Not sure the fabulaes are so conventionally (read: religiously) moral at all times.

Jack17
21-10-2013, 19:36
I have trouble understanding the highlighted characteristics, Jack. Care to explain?

On a general note, I'd rather think, folk fairy-tales are very much archetype-based and therefore universal. Not sure the fabulaes are so conventionally (read: religiously) moral at all times.
All seems rather elementary to me: folk tales, fairy tales, Märchen, and religions, they are all vehicles for conveying certain moral precepts.

Is that concept a revelation for you and Tolka?

VicY
22-10-2013, 18:18
Aren't Fairy Tales etc universal in that they are designed to teach children about morality, the difference between good & evil etc?

Yes, but I am more and more amazed at how many of them have similar origins...Sometimes it's not even very clear which one was there first ;)

So today we did another one that rang the bell very clearly: The Three Little Pigs! :D Exactly the same story read to me in my childhood...only in Russian :)

The play we're doing with my P.3s and P.4s is based on "One More Wish", which is an almost 100% blueprint of what I've always known as Pushkin's "A Tale of the Fisherman and the Goldfish". :hooray:

VicY
22-10-2013, 18:43
I wouldn't say that that is their only design by any means, but they DO accomplish that, among other things. (Cough! Ahem! Did you read the links I posted? They address that...)



Yes, and on that account I agree completely with annasophia.

I think fairy tales are good in that they are always allegories based on real life events. More often than not these events are far from what you'd want to tell a child (most folk tales have rather dark origins), so over a long time and as they were passed down from person to person, their plots were modified ;)
Some retained a bit of that darkness though...For example, there is a Russian folk tale called "Morozko": http://russian-crafts.com/tales/morozko.html

I think it reminds one of the Snow White plot a bit? ;) The trick is to understand that this is just a folk tale, a parable of what life may be all about. It's certainly quite silly to be taking all that is described in the folk tale at face value!

Here is the funniest bit.
I have a Russian friend down here that is married to a Japanese guy. He is not very enthusiastic about Russian cartoons and folk tales. Once, when his wife was watching "Morozko" with their young daughter, he asked them to tell him what the story was about. After he heard the gist, he said that they should stop watching it because a "sick folk tale like this is not suitable for his child".

LOL, apparently, Japanese anime is just about the most suitable material for young children...:rolleyes: Who should say that but the Japanese! :D

rusmeister
22-10-2013, 21:41
Yes, and on that account I agree completely with annasophia.

I think fairy tales are good in that they are always allegories based on real life events. More often than not these events are far from what you'd want to tell a child (most folk tales have rather dark origins), so over a long time and as they were passed down from person to person, their plots were modified ;)
Some retained a bit of that darkness though...For example, there is a Russian folk tale called "Morozko": http://russian-crafts.com/tales/morozko.html

I think it reminds one of the Snow White plot a bit? ;) The trick is to understand that this is just a folk tale, a parable of what life may be all about. It's certainly quite silly to be taking all that is described in the folk tale at face value!

Here is the funniest bit.
I have a Russian friend down here that is married to a Japanese guy. He is not very enthusiastic about Russian cartoons and folk tales. Once, when his wife was watching "Morozko" with their young daughter, he asked them to tell him what the story was about. After he heard the gist, he said that they should stop watching it because a "sick folk tale like this is not suitable for his child".

LOL, apparently, Japanese anime is just about the most suitable material for young children...:rolleyes: Who should say that but the Japanese! :D

Actually, it's a variant of "Hansel and Gretel". But what interests me is the universality of these tales, especially acoss Christendom.

I'm not sure that your Japanese acquaintance has a clear idea of what is sick and what is not, and Japanime may well be a contributing factor to that inability.

VicY
23-10-2013, 18:06
Actually, it's a variant of "Hansel and Gretel". But what interests me is the universality of these tales, especially acoss Christendom.

I'm not sure that your Japanese acquaintance has a clear idea of what is sick and what is not, and Japanime may well be a contributing factor to that inability.

Yes, that is the point I was also trying to make!

To hear that from a Japanese person...is somewhat ridiculous. Apart from the usual anime, there are tons of stuff in Japan that are just beyond some people's understanding. For example, it is pretty normal to see common stationary sold next to porn cartoon books in Japan.

Anyway, the old movie Morozko is not my favourite. I believe it looks rather boring and I certainly wouldn't watch it with a 5-year old. But it's this Japanese arrogance that made me go "WTF?" initially and then I just laughed.

rusmeister
24-10-2013, 06:26
You know, one depiction of a fairy tale I especially enjoy is Disney's "Beauty and the Beast". Aside from the whole Christian theme of the necessity of loving something unlovable to make it lovable, which Disney could hardly avoid, they wind up portraying (unintentionally!) the general resurrection of the dead in the final scene. It is wholly Paschal.

I can almost imagine the secular producers, desiring desperately to avoid any religious connection, saying "Whoops! We didn't mean it! It was an accident!" and apologizing for communicating faith, hope and love, which is what the fairy tale is all about.

(See Russian Lad's signature and put two and two together.)

VicY
24-10-2013, 19:18
Oh yes, Rus...Beauty and the Beast. That is a western version of The Scarlet Flower (Аленький цветочек).

What's funny is that English language sources claim it was a French borrowing, whereas Russian sources are not as willing to admit the connection ;)


The Scarlet Flower - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%90%D0%BB%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%8C%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B9_%D1%86%D0%B2%D0%B5%D1%82%D0%BE%D1%87%D0%B5%D0%BA_(%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B0%D0%B7%D0%BA%D0%B0)

The article on the animated version, created in 1952:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scarlet_Flower_(1952_film)