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robertmf
05-10-2013, 01:12
During the Soviet era, buying goods required standing in line, a particular phenomenon that required a specific vocabulary.

Store shelves were occupied by “unsellable” items, that is, goods for which there was no demand. If something that was truly needed went on sale, a line formed for it, sometimes for hours on end. This situation was described with the verbs “to give” or “to throw out” (the short from of the expression “they threw it out for sale”), as in: “They’re giving coffee at the bakery!” or “They threw out jeans at the department store!”

Soviets, even when they did not set out to go shopping, would carry with them a mesh bag just in case. As early as the 1930s, thanks to stand-up comedian Arkady Raikin, this bag got the name avoska, or “string bag.” possibilities bag



-- RBTH article recalling Soviet past (http://rbth.ru/blogs/2013/10/03/recalling_the_soviet_past_line_deficit_string_bag_30493.html)

Benedikt
05-10-2013, 08:28
[QUOTE=robertmf;1224702][I]During the Soviet era, buying goods required standing in line, a particular phenomenon that required a specific vocabulary.


http://rbth.ru/articles/2013/01/14/the_russian_picture_dictionary_change_in_relationship_after_marriage_21859.html

and you will find out that , in russian language, the in laws of the man/husband are called with a different name than the in laws of woman wife....

TolkoRaz
05-10-2013, 10:11
During the Soviet era, buying goods required standing in line, a particular phenomenon that required a specific vocabulary.

Store shelves were occupied by “unsellable” items, that is, goods for which there was no demand. If something that was truly needed went on sale, a line formed for it, sometimes for hours on end. This situation was described with the verbs “to give” or “to throw out” (the short from of the expression “they threw it out for sale”), as in: “They’re giving coffee at the bakery!” or “They threw out jeans at the department store!”

Soviets, even when they did not set out to go shopping, would carry with them a mesh bag just in case. As early as the 1930s, thanks to stand-up comedian Arkady Raikin, this bag got the name avoska, or “string bag.” possibilities bag



-- RBTH article recalling Soviet past (http://rbth.ru/blogs/2013/10/03/recalling_the_soviet_past_line_deficit_string_bag_30493.html)

The Avoska or 'Just in Case' string bag was a great Soviet invention, but you should have seen the queues to buy one! ;)