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George87
26-09-2013, 03:43
Hi,

I'm after some advice from anyone that is currently or has been a teacher in Russia. I am planning to come and need some advice on the best way to do things. Please tell me which option you would choose from below and why. If you think of what may be a better option I should take please also share it with me.

1) Come to Moscow on a 3 month business visa and study CELTA full-time for one month. Leave the country after 1 month, find employment online and re-enter the country on a work-visa and commence my new job.

Negatives I can see are that I have to have a lot of out of pocket expenses during the time I do my CELTA, example accommodation and travel costs in and out of the country.

2) Arrange employment in Moscow whilst still in Australia. Negotiate with the school to work a 4 day working week for the first 3 months of my 9 month contract. Use the another 2 days of my week to study CELTA part-time over 12 weeks.

Positives are that I am earning right off the plane, have accommodation. Negatives are that I'm doing things 6 days a week.

3)Come to Moscow paying for my own accommodation the first month whilst doing CELTA part-time over 12 weeks. Find employment on the ground.

A little about me. I've been teaching English 4 years and hold a TESOL, 26 and Australian. I haven't finished my university degree yet but I'm pretty sure a TESOL with experience can land me a job there but I do want to move up further in my qualifications so that's why I'm wanting to do my CELTA there.

Please share any ideas or thoughts you have.

Cheers,

George

Russian Lad
26-09-2013, 04:04
Hi George, have you been to Moscow/Russia before? Why do you want to move to Russia?
Anyway, we have had an Australian here (Yakspeare), I guess he can give you the best advice, he used to teach English in Russia. Unfortunately, he threw tantrums and left the forum, but I am sure there are many people here who have his email and will be able to give it to you.
My advice would be to finish the Uni first, it will be harder to do it later. But I don't know your circumstances, on the other hand, so it is just an advice out of the blue.:)

George87
26-09-2013, 06:30
Hi George, have you been to Moscow/Russia before? Why do you want to move to Russia?
Anyway, we have had an Australian here (Yakspeare), I guess he can give you the best advice, he used to teach English in Russia. Unfortunately, he threw tantrums and left the forum, but I am sure there are many people here who have his email and will be able to give it to you.
My advice would be to finish the Uni first, it will be harder to do it later. But I don't know your circumstances, on the other hand, so it is just an advice out of the blue.:)

Thanks for the speedy reply. Doesn't really need to be from an Australian. Anyone teaching from a native English speaking country would all be in the same boat. Yea as for university, I study the course through correspondence anyway, so it's not really an issue where I am situated.

VicY
26-09-2013, 11:07
Is it still okay to teach English in Russia, when you don't have a degree?
I remember the first time I worked with other foreign teachers you only had to have CELTA, but it was a long time ago and I am not sure things are the same these days.
I don't think living in Moscow for one straight month without any work or recourse to funds while doing the CELTA is a good idea: Moscow is a very expensive city!

George87
26-09-2013, 11:37
Is it still okay to teach English in Russia, when you don't have a degree?
I remember the first time I worked with other foreign teachers you only had to have CELTA, but it was a long time ago and I am not sure things are the same these days.
I don't think living in Moscow for one straight month without any work or recourse to funds while doing the CELTA is a good idea: Moscow is a very expensive city!

Hi Vicky. Yep no degree is currently required, although I do believe it was the case for a while, it is not currently necessary.

Russian Lad
26-09-2013, 11:50
Is it still okay to teach English in Russia, when you don't have a degree?

I think it can fly with foreigners as native speakers, I am sure it was the case before, too. But the pay may be affected I guess. I have heard about salaries for foreigners in the vicinity of 40K rubles in Moscow, which really is a hand-to-mouth sub-existence there, with a little room rent starting at 15K and the apartment rent - at 50K. But well, it depends on the person's contacts also I think.
George, if I had the ambition to teach English, I would make my own site, promote it and teach via Internet. From the warm, cheap and accommodating Thailand, also making some money off the advertisement on the site.:) It is the 21st century out there, netocracy rules.:) Or you have been ommitting a gorgeous Russian woman from your story?:)

George87
26-09-2013, 14:27
I think it can fly with foreigners as native speakers, I am sure it was the case before, too. But the pay may be affected I guess. I have heard about salaries for foreigners in the vicinity of 40K rubles in Moscow, which really is a hand-to-mouth sub-existence there, with a little room rent starting at 15K and the apartment rent - at 50K. But well, it depends on the person's contacts also I think.
George, if I had the ambition to teach English, I would make my own site, promote it and teach via Internet. From the warm, cheap and accommodating Thailand, also making some money off the advertisement on the site.:) It is the 21st century out there, netocracy rules.:) Or you have been ommitting a gorgeous Russian woman from your story?:)

No gorgeous woman in the story yet, there has been in the past though. When I was teaching up in Harbin, North East China, I was with a Russian girl for 6 months. A lot of Russians studied university in Harbin and the city has quite a Russian influence.

For a long time my interest has been growing in Russia and it's now time to get the ball rolling. Honestly I was in China from 2007-2012 with a brief stint in the Republic of Georgia and have had enough of Asia for a while.

I am sure I can find my way there, just would like a bit of input.

VicY
26-09-2013, 17:57
No gorgeous woman in the story yet, there has been in the past though. When I was teaching up in Harbin, North East China, I was with a Russian girl for 6 months. A lot of Russians studied university in Harbin and the city has quite a Russian influence.

For a long time my interest has been growing in Russia and it's now time to get the ball rolling. Honestly I was in China from 2007-2012 with a brief stint in the Republic of Georgia and have had enough of Asia for a while.

I am sure I can find my way there, just would like a bit of input.

Interesting!
On and off, I spent 5 years in China but I've always been in the south. Never fancied the north much ;)

Ref. degrees, it used to be the same in China: you didn't need to have a university degree to get officially employed, but it has now changed and in order to find a decent job you must have a degree.

andymackem
27-09-2013, 00:44
It's a while since I was in this game, but you'll find the only place offering a CELTA in Moscow is BKC. They tend to offer jobs to most people who successfully complete the course, meaning they can upgrade your biz visa into a work visa when you sign up with them.

A typical BKC contract used to pay something like 30,000r (approx US$1,000) per month, and accommodation was included in that (shared with another teacher, in a fairly shabby flat out in the suburbs - you don't get palaces). 30 hrs teaching time a week.

This has pros and cons: the good news is most of your immediate needs (income, accomodation) are met from the off, and you don't need to worry about return trips down under. It also gives you time to get a bit more established in Moscow while having something of a safety net. Because BKC is a large school you get a lot of teachers thrown together with varying experience of Russia / Moscow, which is a useful social (and teaching) resource to draw on while you settle in.

The bad news is that it's a McSchool - teachers aren't really challenged or developed (or sometimes even supported), the key thing is to make money for the bosses. If you are placed in sympathetic branches with good local managers, you'll be fine, but there have been horror stories from some teachers as well. I did two contracts with them (in 2006 and 2008) and was OK both times. They didn't promise much, but they did everything they said they would. I know others who've been much less content with the experience. I think there was even one case of a teacher taking the school to court over some dispute, although that was after my time. To be honest, if you're arriving in Moscow with no contacts, you'll likely end up in a school like this - I don't believe EF and Language Link are very different - and there are a few people who were there with me and still work with them, so it can be a good deal. But go in with appropriate expectations. You won't be teaching the beautiful daughters of oligarchs for telephone number salaries, and while you won't starve you won't be living the high life either. And you'll get to know Kroshka Kartoshka and StarDogs better than you might like. Good luck!

VicY
27-09-2013, 18:02
I beg your pardon, Kroshka Kartoshka is god's gift when it comes to fast food. I wouldn't write it off even if I were making a fortune in Moscow! Many foreigners in my last company admitted to being "Kroshka Kartoshka addicts", they just couldn't have enough of it :D

As for the BKC, I worked for them in 2004, albeit on a part-time basis. Apparently, their hourly rate is considerably better than when you are on a contract. I was generally happy with everything and at that time they'd also hold quite a few PD workshops, many of which were interesting and useful. You couldn't become rich working there, but the atmosphere and general management were rather nice. I believe it's a good starting point for anyone who seeks to begin a teaching career in Moscow.

andymackem
27-09-2013, 22:30
I was more of a StarDog man myself. But Kroshka has its uses. Maybe not every day, though.

Tend to agree about BKC: not perfect, but tends to do what it says it will. However, I know that not everyone would agree with me, hence my words of caution.

Nobbynumbnuts
27-09-2013, 22:48
I beg your pardon, Kroshka Kartoshka is god's gift when it comes to fast food. I wouldn't write it off even if I were making a fortune in Moscow! Many foreigners in my last company admitted to being "Kroshka Kartoshka addicts", they just couldn't have enough of it :D

As for the BKC, I worked for them in 2004, albeit on a part-time basis. Apparently, their hourly rate is considerably better than when you are on a contract. I was generally happy with everything and at that time they'd also hold quite a few PD workshops, many of which were interesting and useful. You couldn't become rich working there, but the atmosphere and general management were rather nice. I believe it's a good starting point for anyone who seeks to begin a teaching career in Moscow.

Kroshka Kartoshka was the first thing i ate when i arrived in Moscow back in 2001. There used to be one outside Mariott Aurora. I didn't understand some of the fillings but got to really enjoy them. Cheap, tasty food on your way home! ;)

VicY
28-09-2013, 06:13
I was more of a StarDog man myself. But Kroshka has its uses. Maybe not every day, though.

Tend to agree about BKC: not perfect, but tends to do what it says it will. However, I know that not everyone would agree with me, hence my words of caution.

Ah, each to their own. :) I won't be mistaken, I think, if I say that I only tried StarDog once and never went there again. Not my cup of tea.

I also remember we had a few teachers who weren't all that happy but, thankfully, there were no horror stories.

VicY
28-09-2013, 06:17
Kroshka Kartoshka was the first thing i ate when i arrived in Moscow back in 2001. There used to be one outside Mariott Aurora. I didn't understand some of the fillings but got to really enjoy them. Cheap, tasty food on your way home! ;)

My favourite ones are "selyodka v masle" (herring in oil) and "brynza s ukropom" (a kind of cheese similar to feta, with dill). :D
Mmm...

robertmf
28-09-2013, 06:54
Kroshka Kartoshka was the first thing i ate when i arrived in Moscow back in 2001. There used to be one outside Mariott Aurora. I didn't understand some of the fillings but got to really enjoy them. Cheap, tasty food on your way home! ;)

:evilgrin: C+ for calories (http://www.waytorussia.net/moscow/restaurant/kroshka-kartoshka-restaurant.html) :Loco:

Voland10128
30-09-2013, 07:50
1. Don't consider anything illegal;

2. You can get away with almost anything here.

VicY
30-09-2013, 09:28
:evilgrin: C+ for calories (http://www.waytorussia.net/moscow/restaurant/kroshka-kartoshka-restaurant.html) :Loco:

Jeez, that is ONE OLD article! 24 roubles for a Kroshka Kartoshka potato?? That is like the last century :D

Alan65
30-09-2013, 11:34
My favourite ones are "selyodka v masle" (herring in oil) and "brynza s ukropom" (a kind of cheese similar to feta, with dill). :D
Mmm...

Herrings :eek: I have just had a flashback to a time in Iceland, we had played a gig or two, had not eaten for a few days and got to the airport departure lounge, all of the shops were closed with the exception of duty free, the only thing they had that resembled food was a king size pack of rollmops.

So we bought that along with a bottle of Jacks and vodka....two hours later we were throwing our guts up for hours :eek:

VicY
30-09-2013, 14:10
Alan, that can only mean one thing: that herring wasn't fresh. I believe I could safely say I've never had food poisoning from salted herring. Cooked fish, yes, but not herring.

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 14:26
My favourite ones are "selyodka v masle" (herring in oil) and "brynza s ukropom" (a kind of cheese similar to feta, with dill). :D
Mmm...

I remember those varieties very well. Took me a little while to get used to them but i love them now. I also like the one with ham in it.
They could use something like that in London...:)

Sana
30-09-2013, 15:09
I remember those varieties very well. Took me a little while to get used to them but i love them now. I also like the one with ham in it.
They could use something like that in London...:)

I remember my first trip to the UK 20 years ago when I btw tried your famous jacket potato stuffed with something like stewed cabbage leaves or so ...We didn't have Kartishka Kroshja outlets at that time in Moscow. So later I always thought we borrowed the idea from the British Jacket Potato dish.

VicY
30-09-2013, 18:44
I remember those varieties very well. Took me a little while to get used to them but i love them now. I also like the one with ham in it.
They could use something like that in London...:)

I think the fillings you use for jacket potatoes in the UK are quite straightforward and don't require getting used to, but what I didn't like about your potato is that most of the time it's rather dry...As in, there's no butter or cheese added to the initial version. You can have cheese as a 'filling' per se, but not as part of the package, if you know what I mean ;) Also, I found it weird that in some places they'd only put one filling in and refuse to add anything else. With Kroshka Kartoshka you can have as many as you like, as long as you pay for them :D

VicY
30-09-2013, 18:48
Somehow we moved from talking about CELTA, visas and schools to Kroshka Kartoshka and herring in oil :D That's your average Expat thread :evilgrin:

Here are a couple of photos from my BKC days in 2004 :) It was a good time now that I think about it.

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 19:28
I think the fillings you use for jacket potatoes in the UK are quite straightforward and don't require getting used to, but what I didn't like about your potato is that most of the time it's rather dry...As in, there's no butter or cheese added to the initial version. You can have cheese as a 'filling' per se, but not as part of the package, if you know what I mean ;) Also, I found it weird that in some places they'd only put one filling in and refuse to add anything else. With Kroshka Kartoshka you can have as many as you like, as long as you pay for them :D

I know exactly what you're saying. I just think it's our way of doing things.
We don't usually mix the baked potato with anything just split them and put the filling in. Cheese, tuna, baked beans being the most popular. Very neutral and boring really. Brits wouldn't go for herring and chopped gherkins in a baked spud unless you put a gun to their heads. Then they'd love you for it!!
A little business opportunity there perhaps....;)

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 19:33
I remember my first trip to the UK 20 years ago when I btw tried your famous jacket potato stuffed with something like stewed cabbage leaves or so ...We didn't have Kartishka Kroshja outlets at that time in Moscow. So later I always thought we borrowed the idea from the British Jacket Potato dish.

I have never heard of that. Only thing that comes close i can think of is bubble and squeek. Mashed potato mixed with chopped cabbage but any left over vegetables can be used. It's then fried. Quite tasty for breakfast if you put a fried egg on top! ;)

VicY
30-09-2013, 19:39
I have never heard of that. Only thing that comes close i can think of is bubble and squeek. Mashed potato mixed with chopped cabbage but any left over vegetables can be used. It's then fried. Quite tasty for breakfast if you put a fried egg on top! ;)

Ohhh, Bubble-and-Squeak!! My first landlady used to make a magically delicious (or so I thought on those days) one! :lick:

robertmf
30-09-2013, 19:48
I have never heard of that. Only thing that comes close i can think of is bubble and squeek. Mashed potato mixed with chopped cabbage but any left over vegetables can be used. It's then fried. Quite tasty for breakfast if you put a fried egg on top! ;)

Sometimes bubble & squeak is mentioned by Fenwick-Jones.

Graham Fenwick Jones on Vladimir Putin. - YouTube

Sana
30-09-2013, 19:50
I have never heard of that. Only thing that comes close i can think of is bubble and squeek. Mashed potato mixed with chopped cabbage but any left over vegetables can be used. It's then fried. Quite tasty for breakfast if you put a fried egg on top! ;)

Ok, well, I first ate jacket potatoes in Torquay (Devonshire) in 1996, actually where I was introduced for the first time to such food as fish and chips, scones with tea, and their famous Jacket Potato. I am surprised you haven't heard of Jacket Potato. The dish you described sounds very tasty as well, a variety of our potato casserole. It can be with vegetables or meat ...ah, yeah, jacket potato can be stuffed with cheese and veggies too.

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 19:53
Ohhh, Bubble-and-Squeak!! My first landlady used to make a magically delicious (or so I thought on those days) one! :lick:

You can easily make it yourself. Here's a variation:-
Bake a large potato rather than making mash potato if you like. meanwhile chop half an onion. Cook it gently in butter and a little oil until soft and lightly browned. Add a little chopped bacon and fry a few minutes more.
When the spud is cooked, scoop it out, keeping the skins. Add the onion mixture, chopped cabbage (or any green vegetable) and any strong flavoured cheese, grated, salt and pepper, mix well and put back into the potato skins. Put back in a hot oven for 10-15 minutes......................then scoff! ;)

robertmf
30-09-2013, 19:54
The dish you described sounds very tasty as well, a variety of our potato casserole. It can be with vegetables or meet.

The British are notorious bad cooks.

meat not meet. Same pronounciation, but one is noun and one is verb.

Sana
30-09-2013, 19:56
The British are notorious bad cooks.

meat not meet. Same pronounciation, but one is noun and one is verb.



I know dear Robert. Just a typo...but anyway, I don't eat it.

penka
30-09-2013, 19:57
The British are notorious bad cooks.

meat not meet. Same pronounciation, but one is noun and one is verb.



Robert,

1. You are evil!
2. You are repeating yourself.
3. Where is my Maine lobster??????????? Suffering here!!!!!!

robertmf
30-09-2013, 20:00
Robert,

1. You are evil!
2. You are repeating yourself.
3. Where is my Maine lobster??????????? Suffering here!!!!!!

I just got several items for you :)

Is the mailing address you sent me correct for Russia ?

I thought the Russia Post does the address upside-down ? City at the top, with name at the bottom ?

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 20:03
The British are notorious bad cooks.......

Where exactly?
Some of the best chefs in the world these days are Brits.
London has been voted the best city to dine in many times and usually beats Paris! A lot to do with out ethnic diversity, i guess! ;)

robertmf
30-09-2013, 20:08
Where exactly?
Some of the best chefs in the world these days are Brits.
London has been voted the best city to dine in many times and usually beats Paris! A lot to do with out ethnic diversity, i guess! ;)


Have you been smoking whacky-weed :question:

I think your taste buds are failing :Loco:

:10641:

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 20:10
Have you been smoking whacky-weed :question:

I think your taste buds are failing :Loco:

:10641:

Do some research.......;)

Sana
30-09-2013, 20:11
Where exactly?
Some of the best chefs in the world these days are Brits.
London has been voted the best city to dine in many times and usually beats Paris! A lot to do with out ethnic diversity, i guess! ;)

Year, sure, but the best chefs use any options, and they don't stick to only British cuisine. And you say, it is hard for your British people to get used to the tastes of gherkins and herring. But we love pickles, and the French do. Not sure about Americans... Do you, Robert! Lol

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 20:16
Year, sure, but the best chefs use any options, and they don't stick to only British cuisine. And you say, it is hard for your British people to get used to the tastes of gherkins and herring. But we love pickles, and the French do.

I think you'll find any cuisine you want in London and many you've never heard of. ;)
Brits love herrings and gherkins, we just don't eat them in baked potatoes...................neither do the French ;)

VicY
30-09-2013, 20:18
You can easily make it yourself. Here's a variation:-
Bake a large potato rather than making mash potato if you like. meanwhile chop half an onion. Cook it gently in butter and a little oil until soft and lightly browned. Add a little chopped bacon and fry a few minutes more.
When the spud is cooked, scoop it out, keeping the skins. Add the onion mixture, chopped cabbage (or any green vegetable) and any strong flavoured cheese, grated, salt and pepper, mix well and put back into the potato skins. Put back in a hot oven for 10-15 minutes......................then scoff! ;)

Thanks for the recipe! We do have a similar dish, I think, only somehow, when my landlady was making it, it tasted special and wasn't exactly the same as our casserole or potato/vegetable stew.

robertmf
30-09-2013, 20:18
Do some research.......;)

I did.

I had London breakfast - 2 fried eggs floating in cold congealed grease with a banger. Cold Cold Cold.

:11513: I had to bribe the bartender to give me ice in drink.

I had a pub lunch of roast beef with unbelieveably starchy mashed. All cold.



:10641:

VicY
30-09-2013, 20:21
I think you'll find any cuisine you want in London and many you've never heard of. ;)
Brits love herrings and gherkins, we just don't eat them in baked potatoes...................neither do the French ;)

Brits love herrings?? :eek: How so? Are we talking about the same kind of herring? I am talking of the salted one/in brine/oil. I never saw anything like this sold in London or the rest of UK until very recently and that is only just in the Russian shop in Queensway. Can't recall seeing any Brit buy themselves a pound or two of salted herring there! :D

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 20:23
I did.

I had London breakfast - 2 fried eggs floating in cold congealed grease with a banger. Cold Cold Cold.

:11513: I had to bribe the bartender to give me ice in drink.

I had a pub lunch of roast beef with unbelieveably starchy mashed. All cold.



:10641:

Best to keep away from London then......;)

VicY
30-09-2013, 20:24
I did.

I had London breakfast - 2 fried eggs floating in cold congealed grease with a banger. Cold Cold Cold.

:11513: I had to bribe the bartender to give me ice in drink.

I had a pub lunch of roast beef with unbelieveably starchy mashed. All cold.



:10641:

Oh Robert....Who should be moaning about eating something 'wrong' but an American! Sorry, I find it hard to believe that American national cuisine is much better - or in fact much different - than the British one.
What's American cuisine anyway? :p

Sana
30-09-2013, 20:28
I think you'll find any cuisine you want in London and many you've never heard of. ;)
Brits love herrings and gherkins, we just don't eat them in baked potatoes...................neither do the French ;)

Yes, I can find any cuisine in London. But I think you will agree with me that British people (and so British chefs) are more conservative in everything than other nationalities. For instance, my ex bf (very snobbish Brit from York) hated the idea of trying gherkins and herring no matter how hard I begged him to eat it for -supper- ...not for breakfast, not even for lunch. He would laugh at my "Russian" tastes concerning food and even clothes, and the French have small outlet shops where they sell salads. We call one for instance Olivier, the French salad, and they call such salad - the Russian salad. And you can find inside both gherkins cut in very small pieces and boiled potatoes cut in very small pieces, etc...

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 20:30
Brits love herrings?? :eek: How so? Are we talking about the same kind of herring? I am talking of the salted one/in brine/oil. I never saw anything like this sold in London or the rest of UK until very recently and that is only just in the Russian shop in Queensway. Can't recall seeing any Brit buy themselves a pound or two of salted herring there! :D

Herrings were a massive industry at one time in the UK. Especially on the east coast. We don't eat them salted so much as smoked and fresh. Unfortunately the north sea is pretty much fished out these days.
On the east coast, especially around cornwall we used to have a lot of sardines (known as pilchards in the UK) It was another huge industry, all but disappeared now.

VicY
30-09-2013, 20:39
Herrings were a massive industry at one time in the UK. Especially on the east coast. We don't eat them salted so much as smoked and fresh. Unfortunately the north sea is pretty much fished out these days.
On the east coast, especially around cornwall we used to have a lot of sardines (known as pilchards in the UK) It was another huge industry, all but disappeared now.

Oh I see...Well, then yes, we are talking of slightly different things. In fact, I found that of all foreigners, the ones that truly love Russian salted herring are Scandinavians! ;) And unsurprisingly so! For they have something that's called herring in brine, usually more like a marinade, made with red or white wine. The herring prepared in such a marinade tastes somewhat similar to your average Russian herring ;)

Nobbynumbnuts
30-09-2013, 20:48
Oh I see...Well, then yes, we are talking of slightly different things. In fact, I found that of all foreigners, the ones that truly love Russian salted herring are Scandinavians! ;) And unsurprisingly so! For they have something that's called herring in brine, usually more like a marinade, made with red or white wine. The herring prepared in such a marinade tastes somewhat similar to your average Russian herring ;)

Yes, the Scandinavians are big on raw herrings, their roll mops are fantastic. I also like lightly salted salmon, a traditional Russian speciality. Great in pasta with a cream sauce and mushrooms as well...:)

Alan65
01-10-2013, 00:31
Alan, that can only mean one thing: that herring wasn't fresh. I believe I could safely say I've never had food poisoning from salted herring. Cooked fish, yes, but not herring.

Vicy....perhaps I had just spent 48 hours on chang :D

Nobbynumbnuts
01-10-2013, 02:39
Vicy....perhaps I had just spent 48 hours on chang :D

Think Chang, think Baltika.
Always go for the Chang Export-a tad more expensive but a much better beer :10518:

VicY
01-10-2013, 08:41
Lol, no idea what you're talking about, guys, as I don't drink bear ;)

penka
01-10-2013, 10:48
I just got several items for you :)

Is the mailing address you sent me correct for Russia ?

I thought the Russia Post does the address upside-down ? City at the top, with name at the bottom ?


WOW

Yes, it's correct.

Don't know, I was not posting letters the Russian way for the past 20 years.....

robertmf
01-10-2013, 20:41
WOW

Yes, it's correct.

Don't know, I was not posting letters the Russian way for the past 20 years.....

Okay. I'll mail early.