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thewanderer
10-12-2007, 14:46
OK, so I'm starting to look forward to the process of getting temporary and hopefully permanent residency over the next few years, and I have a question.

I've looked over the list of requirements for the temp res, and the one thing I have a question about is the police record. I'm an American citizen, and since my visa expires in May it looks likely that we'll have to return to the US to renew our visas (and have a baby there as well). I would love to get the police records while we're in the US, since that is apparently much simpler than doing it from here.

Since we're planning to move out of Moscow Oblast in early 2009, there's no point in getting the temporary residency here (my understanding is that I can't get temp res here and then get the perm res when we move - can anyone confirm that for me?). This means that I'll be applying for the temp res sometime at the beginning of 2009, but I'd like to use the police records I get in, say, July 2008.

Basically, my question is this: does anyone know if this is acceptable? Is there an expiration date on these docs, and if so, how long is it? I will be in Russia the whole time in between, so presumably any crimes I would have committed in that time wouldn't be known to the FBI anyway. Also, if anyone knows what age requires the police check, that would be helpful, since I'll be applying with my (also American) wife and (by then) two toddlers. Do the kids need an FBI records check as well? That might be tricky, especially for the one due next May, since I don't know if I can get an FBI record for a newborn.

Surfsup37
10-12-2007, 14:52
Unfortunately, the police report is good for only 3 months. The Russian Government wants a new one after that. However, I am not sure how they can tell. I guess by the date of the document. It is not that hard, if you have friends or family. It took my Father a day to do it for me, but he is near the state capital.

thewanderer
10-12-2007, 20:43
Thanks for your help - I'll have to have family do it then. Do you know if I can at least get my fingerprints for them while I'm there and then leave them with whoever will do it for me? I'm thinking of having the fingerprints done there, and then handing them to my inlaws to then send in whenever we're a month or two away from actually applying for residency.

Would save me the trip to the embassy here to have fingerprints taken if it's possible.

Bels
10-12-2007, 20:57
Thanks for your help - I'll have to have family do it then. Do you know if I can at least get my fingerprints for them while I'm there and then leave them with whoever will do it for me? I'm thinking of having the fingerprints done there, and then handing them to my inlaws to then send in whenever we're a month or two away from actually applying for residency.

Would save me the trip to the embassy here to have fingerprints taken if it's possible.


The only fingerprints I had done was when my application for temprary residency was succusful. I then had to return to ovir to have my fingerprints done by ovir. No finger prints were required for a British police check. And the Russians are not concerned about finger prints, only their own.

Yes three months expiry. Tight going for me, receiving my police check by post to Russia, and then having to return it to another goverment dept in the UK to have it apostiled.

thva
10-12-2007, 22:26
this is another example of different people giving different answers - I was just at my okruzhnoi OVIR this AM (took hours, of course) and was told specifically that my 3-month-old document would be good for 6 months

btw, I did my prints here, and found it very easy and quick - my guess is that it would be more trouble to do in the US

Bels
10-12-2007, 22:46
this is another example of different people giving different answers - I was just at my okruzhnoi OVIR this AM (took hours, of course) and was told specifically that my 3-month-old document would be good for 6 months

btw, I did my prints here, and found it very easy and quick - my guess is that it would be more trouble to do in the US

The expiry time, I'm not sure now. But I thought it was 3 months. What I do remember is that I was under pressure to hand in all my documents into ovir. And the biggest issue was to get a police check, and then get it apostiled and then et it translated into Russian and then get it through intime before the expiry date of the police check.

kapione
11-12-2007, 07:09
you need to go to the American Embassy and talk with someone in citizens services, they will direct you to consulate services.If you call the American Embassy you really wont be helped , no one knows what to tell you .I spoke with a person whom I can not believe she is working at her job , she knew nothing helpful. I was then given a phone number that for info over the phone they would charge me over 300 roubles per minute ,Im not really sure the exact amount, the quality of the recording was horrible.My advice is get a Lawyer to help you if you do not have the time ,becareful of the "agencies" that do this processing. But do NOT expect much help from The American Embassy ,you will get some answers and alot of disappointment

Surfsup37
11-12-2007, 12:08
As everyone has mentioned, different branches of the OVIR interpret the rules differently. If I were you, I would try to stay within the 3 month limit because the processing is completed in the regional centers but who knows, since the process is going to take 6 to 7 months upon submission anyway.


Fingerprints - Some US states and the US FBI require fingerprints in order to process your criminal record. My state didn't but I got the fingerprints because I may use the FBI criminal record as a backup. I'm not sure where to get your fingerprints taken in the US except when you are applying for your criminal record. You may be able to go into your local police station. I don't know.

US Embassy in Moscow - I have found the US Embassy in Moscow to be pretty helpful in regards to US procedures: fingerprints (20 minutes and it was free), registering my child born in Russia, getting documents for my marriage in Russia etc.

However, they have the exact same problems in dealing with the Russian government as we citizens do. i.e. the rules are hard to define, and they change often. They will not offer advice or help on obtaining Russian residency. To be honest, that is not their function. That is my I went to the HQ of the OVIR in Moscow - see Temporary Residency thread