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Carbo
29-11-2007, 17:27
I have just spoken to Vadim at Liga, and he has told me that you may only get a visa in your country of citizenship. He told me explicitly that as a British subject, I could only get a visa within ten days if I wanted to do it in Helsinki, and even then it would down to the decision of the consulate.

I told him that I had read that if I can legally stay in a country for 90 days without a visa, I am able to get a Russian visa in that country, but he replied "I'm sorry, you're worng".

Just thought I'd let you all know.

米乐龙
29-11-2007, 17:37
What are you complaining about? I am from Australia!!! :cussing:

Carbo
29-11-2007, 17:53
What are you complaining about? I am from Australia!!! :cussing:
I can understand. It must be awful. But what has that got to do with visas?:applause::applause:

米乐龙
29-11-2007, 19:57
I can understand. It must be awful. But what has that got to do with visas?:applause::applause:

Are you serious? You just got through telling us about how we must return to our home country to get visas. What does that mean for me??? Well... that means that I have got to buy a 2000 USD or more ticket to Australia each time I want to renew my visa. Wake up!

dick
29-11-2007, 21:05
The U.S. only gives a visa to people in the country they live in.
Why can't Russia?

ezik
29-11-2007, 21:05
Your embassy has been involved in negotiations. Surely they have all info you need!

ezik
29-11-2007, 21:09
The U.S. only gives a visa to people in the country they live in.
Why can't Russia?

Because the U.S. is not Russia's main trade partner. The U.S. is not a touch-stone here.

Carbo
29-11-2007, 22:13
Are you serious? You just got through telling us about how we must return to our home country to get visas. What does that mean for me??? Well... that means that I have got to buy a 2000 USD or more ticket to Australia each time I want to renew my visa. Wake up!

I think you missed the joke, old chap.

Lola7
29-11-2007, 22:41
Local embassies are not posting nor are they necessarily aware of the changes. (Efficiency rules) I have to re apply for something "new" that I can't quite understand, when I go home to Toronto for Christmas. Can't get back in with my previous multi entry business Visa which was supposed to be good till august 08. it's real, and there's some weird 90 days in 90 days out clause that I can't quite make out yet. Hard to get the right answers. Anyone out there Canadian and know anything?

Clean32
29-11-2007, 23:22
What are you complaining about? I am from Australia!!! :cussing:


Aussies and Kiwis have right of residence in pommyland for 2 years. also 90days in each bit of euroland. but id the 90day residence thing ant true then that doint meen squat

Judge
29-11-2007, 23:24
Local embassies are not posting nor are they necessarily aware of the changes. (Efficiency rules) I have to re apply for something "new" that I can't quite understand, when I go home to Toronto for Christmas. Can't get back in with my previous multi entry business Visa which was supposed to be good till august 08. it's real, and there's some weird 90 days in 90 days out clause that I can't quite make out yet. Hard to get the right answers. Anyone out there Canadian and know anything?

A Canadian friend of mine in Moscow has a multi entry business visa issued August 07 and he has been told(local OVIR) that he can stay the whole year ,the new rule 90 day rule doesn't apply to visas that were issued before OCT 17TH.

Who told you that you wont get back in with your visa???By the way,is the 90 day rule printed in your visa???

Clean32
29-11-2007, 23:34
The U.S. only gives a visa to people in the country they live in.
Why can't Russia?

Not correct i have had 4 US visas that were not issued in my country

DooLittle
30-11-2007, 20:01
The U.S. only gives a visa to people in the country they live in.
Why can't Russia?

Not true, the U.S. will issue a visa to someone outside of their own country.

Bels
30-11-2007, 20:52
A Canadian friend of mine in Moscow has a multi entry business visa issued August 07 and he has been told(local OVIR) that he can stay the whole year ,the new rule 90 day rule doesn't apply to visas that were issued before OCT 17TH.

Who told you that you wont get back in with your visa???By the way,is the 90 day rule printed in your visa???

And I could paste a big list of Americans, Australians and Brits who makes the same claim. Only on Brit made the claim that he had the 90 day restriction issued from London. I'm beginning to disbelieve him.

Some Brits have claimed to have 90 days restriction from applying in another EU country, but only some. I think this was a mix-up of other embassies not realising that Britain was exempt from the rule at that time. Sometimes I think these laws come in too fast and queitly that even their own Embassies are aware of what's going on.

Chris Parker
30-11-2007, 22:19
I have just spoken to Vadim at Liga, and he has told me that you may only get a visa in your country of citizenship. He told me explicitly that as a British subject, I could only get a visa within ten days if I wanted to do it in Helsinki, and even then it would down to the decision of the consulate.

I told him that I had read that if I can legally stay in a country for 90 days without a visa, I am able to get a Russian visa in that country, but he replied "I'm sorry, you're worng".

Just thought I'd let you all know.
Must be a lawful permanent resident within the consular district in order to be able to get a visa or other services (including passports and registration) from that embassy. Temporary admission in a country for 90 days is not lawful permanent residence!

Bels
30-11-2007, 22:41
I have just spoken to Vadim at Liga, and he has told me that you may only get a visa in your country of citizenship. He told me explicitly that as a British subject, I could only get a visa within ten days if I wanted to do it in Helsinki, and even then it would down to the decision of the consulate.

I told him that I had read that if I can legally stay in a country for 90 days without a visa, I am able to get a Russian visa in that country, but he replied "I'm sorry, you're worng".

Just thought I'd let you all know.

How do you mean that you have a right to reside in Helsinki for more than 90 days in Helsinki when you are American? If you were British or any other EU member yes I would understand.

Longhorn
01-12-2007, 00:23
I'm sure every Russian consulate/embassy will be enforcing the new rules differently. It truly is incredible how the constant changes keep making it more and more difficult to work or even visit Russia (although the work portion is probably the intent).

For US citizens, also remember that not only do you have to return to the US (most likely, depending on the enforcement by consulates/embassies in other countries) but you will need to obtain your new visa in the consulate/embassy which governs your residence (or last residence) in the US.

Does anybody know how this change will affect the work visas (not the business visas) if at all?

Bels
01-12-2007, 00:39
I'm sure every Russian consulate/embassy will be enforcing the new rules differently. It truly is incredible how the constant changes keep making it more and more difficult to work or even visit Russia (although the work portion is probably the intent).

For US citizens, also remember that not only do you have to return to the US (most likely, depending on the enforcement by consulates/embassies in other countries) but you will need to obtain your new visa in the consulate/embassy which governs your residence (or last residence) in the US.

Does anybody know how this change will affect the work visas (not the business visas) if at all?

I believe that you will be okay with the work visas and teachers must I say, providing the companies n=can provide this invitation, that's the way I see the Russian government has worked it out. You must have a purpose for being in Russia, and we all have. That's the way it it is.

By the way, one American claimed here on this site that he went London and gotr an un-restricted visa, So go to London. But however,keep am aey on these Russian Embassy websites. Laws might change at any moment. That's why it's best to keep an eye on these websites as laws may change at any moment. Do your visas direct. It's cheaper any way and more informative

BrianS
04-12-2007, 00:15
I am an American and the Russian consolate in Kiev gave me a visa without any problems as long as I waited 10 days for the visa. From what I have read this will be the case for Americans unless there are NEWER changes than within the past week.

Rustralian
04-12-2007, 03:02
Must be a lawful permanent resident within the consular district in order to be able to get a visa or other services (including passports and registration) from that embassy. Temporary admission in a country for 90 days is not lawful permanent residence!

I don't think the Russian regulations said anything about a lawful permanent resident. The were just in the context that if you have a right to reside in a country for more than 90 days (I think it was more than 90 and not 90 or more, which takes out most visa waiver type country benefits) then you were entitled to apply for a visa at the Embassy in that country.

The other issue, is that of the over-riding law of reciprocality that relates to the visa regime between Russia and other countries. If for example a Russian is allowed to apply for a Visa to Australia in a country other than Russia (which they are allowed to do) then an Australian is required to be allowed to apply for a visa to Russia in any country as well.

The difficulty of course being that there is no way of forcing a Russian Embassy to adhere to that rule, as there is no administration that you can threaten to complain to, that would make them do the right thing. A common failing point of developing countries - they can agree to and pass all the laws they like which look and sound good, but it does not mean that they will actually adhere to them and provide the reciprocality they are supposed to.
:bash:

Guest
04-12-2007, 09:16
I'm sure every Russian consulate/embassy will be enforcing the new rules differently. It truly is incredible how the constant changes keep making it more and more difficult to work or even visit Russia (although the work portion is probably the intent).

You are right: Tourists are not affected as usually they pickup their visa in their residency country.

The goal of the new rules is exactly to make people who want to WORK in Russia to apply for WORK permits and/or RESIDENCY permits.

Bels
04-12-2007, 11:21
I am an American and the Russian consolate in Kiev gave me a visa without any problems as long as I waited 10 days for the visa. From what I have read this will be the case for Americans unless there are NEWER changes than within the past week.

Let's not forget that their are many examples like this post. Another is an American successfully getting an unrestricted business visa from London.

I'm sure the laws are coming through, but very few Brits and Americans are feeling these restrictions for the moment.

solnishko
04-12-2007, 16:37
I've just heard of an English teacher applying for a work visa in Helsinki having to wait the full 10 days (which evended up being 16 with the weekends etc in there). US citizenship. In the end she was given a "provisional" work visa or something like that, not even the full term of her contract.

Bels
04-12-2007, 17:27
I've just heard of an English teacher applying for a work visa in Helsinki having to wait the full 10 days (which evended up being 16 with the weekends etc in there). US citizenship. In the end she was given a "provisional" work visa or something like that, not even the full term of her contract.

Did the teacher have an official invitation from the school.?

Bels
04-12-2007, 17:30
Helsinki appears to be a problem for some reason, not the first example post I've read. I thouht provided yo have a work contract from an authorised school that their would be no problems and your visa would not be restricted. Perhaps Helsinki is not aware of this.

Bels
04-12-2007, 18:16
It would be nice to hear of experiences from teachers recently employed. Did you have any problems, how long can you stay in Russia for example. Is there anyone working for BKC or LL for example.

Have any of you had any problems?

rosieredwood
04-12-2007, 18:58
The U.S. only gives a visa to people in the country they live in.
Why can't Russia?

Because the US consular sections process more visa applications than virtually all other countries' consular sections combined; so the US policy is merely one of administration, not tit-for-tat. Russia requires US citizens, as well as other countries' citizens, to register once having crossed the border. Should the US government implement this policy on Russians visiting the US? This is patently absurd.

Bels
04-12-2007, 19:40
Because the US consular sections process more visa applications than virtually all other countries' consular sections combined; so the US policy is merely one of administration, not tit-for-tat. Russia requires US citizens, as well as other countries' citizens, to register once having crossed the border. Should the US government implement this policy on Russians visiting the US? This is patently absurd.

Are you saying that Russians can apply for a visa in the UK for example. If so, it sounds ok to me, I don't see why not as there is an American Embassy where you can apply. So a foreigner living in another country for what ever reason, decides Hey! I want to visit Russia! Or Hey! I want to visit the USA. Should there be a problem with that.

Bels
04-12-2007, 19:43
Has any expat of any nationality who has been legally working in Russia, with a proper contract, from a legal company who can invite foreign employees had a problem with restriceted visas? I hope not.

solnishko
04-12-2007, 21:07
Of course they had an official invitation from the school. How else would they be able to apply for a work visa?

Bels
04-12-2007, 21:47
And how long was the contract, and which school? This is valuable info., Are those schools who have invitation rights having problems. I'm sure that's not the intention of the Russian government.

My understanding of the Russian government is that if you don't have problems to work in Russia, and if that's your intention, then there is no problem. How long are you allowed to stay if you are legally employed to stay in Russia. Please don't tell me you have to leave every 90 days, and then not return for 90 days. That's ridiculous! I cant believe it!

Now please direct contacts, from recent employees in Russia as to what your experiences have been. I'm sure we value your experiences highly.

I can't as I'm an entrepeneur with legal residency.

BrianS
05-12-2007, 11:49
I can understand and see what the Russian government is doing/wanting...if you are here to work then get a work permit/visa...if you are here for family...go the residency route, BUT the problem is the residency route takes anywhere from 6-12 months to complete....they should be issuing extended visas or whatnot to people who have applied for residency but are waiting for it to return....obviously these people are trying to follow the law and intentions of the government, but if the government moves so slow on the processing they should not penalize those that wait on them. I am sure the Russian government and economy rather those people spend their money here in Russia than on a forced trip for another visa.

Andy B
05-12-2007, 12:15
I've said a similar thing many times (normally while drunk)... if they made it easier to do things legitimately, people WOULD!

Most people would not object to paying 13% tax, if it meant they were all legal and didn't have to panic or check thr rules each time their visa was due to expire.

Bels
05-12-2007, 18:09
I can understand and see what the Russian government is doing/wanting...if you are here to work then get a work permit/visa...if you are here for family...go the residency route, BUT the problem is the residency route takes anywhere from 6-12 months to complete....they should be issuing extended visas or whatnot to people who have applied for residency but are waiting for it to return....obviously these people are trying to follow the law and intentions of the government, but if the government moves so slow on the processing they should not penalize those that wait on them. I am sure the Russian government and economy rather those people spend their money here in Russia than on a forced trip for another visa.

Spot on! I totally agree with you.

Bels
05-12-2007, 19:35
I've just thought of something important on this issue of only applying for visas in your own country. What if there was important business men American or British ,who had quality connections of business in let's say America, Britain, China and Russia. A qaudrangle of business connections and he travelled to all these countries on a regular basis, and he was a major invester for Russia. I can't see such a situation being uncommon.

Is this great investor for Russia going to have serious problems, such as he's in China and he has to go back Britain or USA to make an application for another visa? Crazy world isn't it.

tgma
06-12-2007, 09:31
Bels
My guess is that any major businessman would be a sufficiently frequent visitor to the UK (assuming he were British) to deal with this, and also probably has someone to deal with this.
This new ruling about having to apply from your own country will be a minor pain for me, as it closes off some options, but to be honest, the Western embassies have been applying similar rules in Moscow for quite some time. A friend of mine had a nightmare getting a study visa for the UK even though she had been a frequent visitor there, and had legally worked there, because she was a Russian, born outside Russia, and didn't have a Moscow propiska. The Russian authorities hear about this sort of thing, and apply reciprocity.

Of course, the Russians should make it easier for Western businessmen to enter the country, as they need foreign investment, but once you see things through the peculiar Russian prism of pride, it does make sense.

Bels
06-12-2007, 21:49
Yes, the rest of the world has already sussed easy entry for westerners as a plus for their country. Why is it I as a Brit I can travel around most countries in the world without a lot of fuss. Now we all know that Brits are great travellers with virtually most of them having a passport. In fact, there is a much higher percentage of Brits possessing a passport than compared to the Americans.

Due to the visa restrictions, there are relatively few Brits in Moscow, in comparison to many other countries and cities in the world. Why? because the other countries have realised that there are no problems with Westerners, and if anything it helps their country financially not to have restrictions.

How many Brits do you know who pops into a travel agent for example, And says where I will I go and have a holiday for my next year. Oh! how about Moscow? Now that looks very interesting, reading the brochure you see that you are responsible to make your own visa arrangements. Oh! forget that, let's try Goa or Florida it's a lot easier.

Bels
28-12-2007, 12:22
I would like to hear a success story from an American who has received a work visa at the London consulate. My moscow company has already received the work permit for me and (hopefully) already submitted it to FMS for the invitation. I understand the reciprocity rule (you can only apply for visa to a consulate in a country in which you can be for more than 90 days w/o visa). And taking aside the fact that people can apply for US visas in countries other than their own. I do not want to hedge my chances on this point due to the incompitence and misinformation rampent in the consulates.

As a US citizen, I am able to be in the UK for up to 6 months without a visa. This information I got from an American Embassy (in Moscow) representative at a conference.

So have any other Americans successfully gotten Visas issued to them in London? I would like to know whether to stay in the states and submit here, or return to Russia (on my grandfathered mulit-business) then fly to London.

The prices for changing my ticket NYC-SVO is appx same as buying new return SVO-London. And its hard to get business done with 10 hour difference :)

There was a recent post of an American getting a non restricted visa from London. I cant remember his name, but he's here somewhere. There is also a special application form for Americans at the london website. Make sure you types it out online, because they won't accept anything else.

rusemblon.org is the address of this site.

Surfsup37
28-12-2007, 14:04
Someone asked about obtaining Russia visas in the US for multi-entry or private invitations. I and my parents have successfully used the following company, since I don't live near a Russian embassy.

Expedited Visas, Visa Applications, Rush Passport, Passports, Travel (http://www.traveldocs.com/)

Last time, I had them use the New York Embassy, and they were pretty helpful. It can be somewhat expensive also, prices are on the site. My parents used the Washington Embassy, and they had problems. I don't think they care where you are living, if you use a service you can use either.

A major headache for me was the aids blood test which can take up to a week to process, and you may need a local doctor's visit before you can obtain permission to take it. Also, you must have the Aids blood test, not the new saliva one. The Russian Embassy would not accept the saliva (one day) test.

If you are already live in Moscow, I recommend that you get the test before you leave.

Digenis Akritas
28-12-2007, 16:52
A major headache for me was the aids blood test which can take up to a week to process, and you may need a local doctor's visit before you can obtain permission to take it. Also, you must have the Aids blood test, not the new saliva one. The Russian Embassy would not accept the saliva (one day) test.

If you are already live in Moscow, I recommend that you get the test before you leave.

Seriously? I've had about 12 Russian visas issued to me over the last few years and the AIDS testing (blood) has been a piece of cake. Totally. Absolutely the easiest part.

I had always used Invitro clinics in the past. Now you may have to use certain state clinics though. I literally walked in, said I need the test, they drew blood within 15 min, and then I came back in 3 days for the certificate. Even a few weeks ago I had just as easy an experience with state clinic, and they did all the testing for the work permit at one location.

Surfsup37
28-12-2007, 17:42
No, you misunderstood me. I went to the US to get my multi-entry visa, and I forgot I needed an Aids blood test.

When I went to the Russian Embassy in the UK, I was never required to have a blood test, however if you get a visa in the US you do. The Russian embassy in the UK tended to treat Americans like British, just like the Russian Embassy in the Netherlands treated Americans like the Dutch. The Russian Embassy in the Netherlands required that I get an Aids test.

It was a hassle getting the Aids test in the US quickly, that's why I was recommending that Americans get the blood test in Russia instead of the US. It is quicker.

In this case, Russia is better. :D

Sorry for the confusion.