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Surfsup37
16-11-2007, 15:51
Kazachka, and myself met with Василий Иванович Машаков, Department Manager at the UVIR/PVO HQ Moscow HQ. The purpose of our meeting was to verify the current requirements for temporary and permanent Russian residency requirements. I am sure that others have had different experiences in the past, or have been told something different by their local OVIR. At the end of this message, I have listed the procedure for gathering the forms, and also arranging to meet with Mr. Mашаков in person.

Required documents for Temporary Residence (разрешения на временное проживание)
Criminal history record Apostille, translated and notarized
o Note to Americans He stated that they required the FBI criminal check not your local Police check. This information disagrees with the US Embassy website, which states either is acceptable. Procedures for completing this procedure are documented on the Embassy website. You do not need to go to the US to complete this step.
o Others have successfully used the state government. I personally am applying for both.
o Criminal Records Checks and Fingerprinting (http://moscow.usembassy.gov/consular/acs.php?record_id=acs_records_checks)
Two completed Temporary Residency forms (разрешения на временное проживание). The forms must completed, but do not sign them, as you must sign them in front of the FMS officer when they receive all your documents.
Notarized translated (into Russian of course) copy of your passport (Since you have provided your passport details, a birth certificate is not required.) The passport must be valid for more than six months.
Notarized copy of apartment ownership document where you are to be registered (You do need to own property. For example, I am using my in-laws apartment. However, if you do own property than follow these same rules)
o Procedure to obtain this document
Notarized copy of the deed
Written consent of all registered persons or owners of this address to allow you to reside there.
An attestation (not notarized) less than one month old, that the apartment has all its amenities paid.
These documents are taken to a notary who provides the form that is to be completed, signed and submitted with your application. Forms and filing for this can be done at any notary.
It was recommended that you go to the local OVIR of the apartment listed above and start the application process there. You could start the process where you are currently registered but at some point, it would get transferred to the above office anyway, which would result in a long delay.
Financial Documents No proof of financial assets is currently required for temporary residence. However, proof of financial assets for permanent residency is 80,000 rubles or approximately $3200 USD.
Medical Tests
o I am not clear if I need a spravka to begin the tests and if so where do you get it? I plan to ask my local OVIR.
o Chest XRAY for TB
o Check for syphilis, chancres, Chlamydia
o Mental and/or drug check
o HIV Test
o leprosy
He recommended that you take medical tests at the clinics specified by your local OVIR, however I recommend that you check with your local OVIR as you may be able to use other clinics like the western clinics. Make sure your name is translated the same as on the visa located on your passport.
These tests are only valid for 3 months before submitting your residency application. I assume that you will need to re-take these tests if you apply for a work permit after receiving your residency.
4 Passport style pictures, black and white, non-digital 35 х 45 мм
2 envelopes with stamps, addressed to you in the place you will be registered.
If married to a Russian Citizen Marriage to a Russian is not required, however if you are married to a Russian citizen then you are exempt from the quota system (Each Russian Region has a set quota for the number of temporary residences to be allowed. You may apply as many times as you want. However, Moscow only has 1500 slots and you will be behind the CIS people. You can go to the OVIR at Tretyakovskaya to file an application 1-10th of the month and wait to see if hell freezes and you get approved. Then it's back to central OVIR where you turn your acceptance in and pursue the rest at your local OVIR. Yes, there are higher numbers for the regions. )

Marriage Certificate -. Notarized copy of marriage certificate if performed in Russia (I believe a translated and notarized copy is required if performed outside Russia.)

Spouse Internal Russian Passport - A copy is fine.

Birth certificate of child If Russian then notarized copy, if not Russian then translated and notarized

Temporary Residence into Permanent Residence

You must wait one year after receiving your temporary residence before you can apply for a permanent residence. This period is true for everyone, even those with Russian spouses married longer than three years.

Entry and Exit from Russia while Temporary Residence is being processed I was told that I could leave and return to Russia at any point in time on my current visa.

Next Steps - Accumulate documents and go to my local OVIR in person to submit documents, wait 3 to 6 months for completed application, pay my FMS fee, and collect documents in person (Along with passing go)

Location of UVIR HQ in Moscow where we meet with Василий Иванович Машаков


The main Russian government organization responsible for visa problems and temporary/permanent residency is: UVIR, 42 Pokrovka, Moscow (closest metro: Krasnyye Vorota), telephone 495) 207-0113 on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays; closed Wednesday.

His hours are Monday and Thursday 11- 13. We arrived at 9:00 and put our name on the list (just a sheet of paper, not the official book). The list keeper is the security guard you see as soon as you arrive. Got back at 10:45, and then arranged ourselves in line. We were 4th and 5th in line. We were seen about 90 minutes later. The room is on the right as you go in. Room # 10. We got the forms in the room to the left as you enter at the first window on the left.






:rules:

Bels
16-11-2007, 18:42
A very useful thread. May I suggest that a mini directory is included here, of all the useful web addresses requred to get your documents. Suchas where to apply for police checks, apostils, etc for all the members nationalities such as British, American and Australian. Because people keep asking. Addresses of Russian embassies in varous countries would als be use.

Because, members keep asking for these same addresses time after time.

Proper Bostonian
17-11-2007, 09:33
Great info! Finally, something coherent! Too bad they don't put the application form online...

As I understand, he couldn't/didn't tell you if medical exams could be done at a local Western clinic?

Also, any comment re: the fact that the FBI doesn't apostille documents? I actually saw on the web site of the Dept. of State that they will apostille a U.S. gov't. document, but that will require even more time...

Thanks for your patience waiting in line and diligence in posting all here.

mefistofele
17-11-2007, 15:04
Financial Documents No proof of financial assets is currently required for temporary residence. However, proof of financial assets for permanent residency is 80,000 rubles or approximately $3200 USD.
:rules:

Not according to the UFMS website (http://www.fmsmoscow.ru/rvp_text.php?nid=32&). They say you need the financial records even for temporary residence:

- один из документов, подтверждающий наличие у заявителя средств, обеспечивающих ему и членам его семьи при проживании в Российской Федерации прожиточный минимум, или документ, подтверждающий его нетрудоспособность (справка о доходах физического лица, декларация о доходах с отметкой налогового органа, справка с места работы, трудовая книжка, пенсионное удостоверение, справка органа социальной защиты о получении пособий, подтверждение о получении алиментов, справка о наличии вклада в кредитном учреждении с указанием номера счета, свидетельство о праве на наследство, справка о доходах лица, на иждивении которого находится заявитель, иной документ, подтверждающий получение доходов от не запрещенной законом деятельности или нетрудоспособность)

mefistofele
17-11-2007, 15:11
If married to a Russian Citizen Marriage to a Russian is not required, however if you are married to a Russian citizen then you are exempt from the quota system (Each Russian Region has a set quota for the number of temporary residences to be allowed. You may apply as many times as you want. However, Moscow only has 1500 slots and you will be behind the CIS people. You can go to the OVIR at Tretyakovskaya to file an application 1-10th of the month and wait to see if hell freezes and you get approved. Then it's back to central OVIR where you turn your acceptance in and pursue the rest at your local OVIR. Yes, there are higher numbers for the regions. )
:rules:

Has anyone here successfully gotten temporary residency via the quota system? Considering that I don't meet any of the exemptions (which, again, are a., marriage to russian national b., having previous russ. citizenship c., having dependent child in russia d., having dependent parent in russia), I'm wondering if it's even worth applying. Any tips? Could a spot be, er, bought? Should one apply for a work permit/visa instead?

raydg
17-11-2007, 16:57
Not according to the UFMS website (http://www.fmsmoscow.ru/rvp_text.php?nid=32&). They say you need the financial records even for temporary residence:

- один из документов, подтверждающий наличие у заявителя средств, обеспечивающих ему и членам его семьи при проживании в Российской Федерации прожиточный минимум, или документ, подтверждающий его нетрудоспособность (справка о доходах физического лица, декларация о доходах с отметкой налогового органа, справка с места работы, трудовая книжка, пенсионное удостоверение, справка органа социальной защиты о получении пособий, подтверждение о получении алиментов, справка о наличии вклада в кредитном учреждении с указанием номера счета, свидетельство о праве на наследство, справка о доходах лица, на иждивении которого находится заявитель, иной документ, подтверждающий получение доходов от не запрещенной законом деятельности или нетрудоспособность)



My wife was also told the same thing and the amount was 5752 roubles a month times 36.

Surfsup37
17-11-2007, 20:08
Questions - As I understand, he couldn't/didn't tell you if medical exams could be done at a local Western clinic?

Answer - He referred me back to my local OVIR. The issue is that as I mention in my post I will be applying for temporary residence in St. Petersburg because that is where my in-laws live. I hope to go next week, and start the process. My first stop is my local OVIR. I have a bunch of questions for them, because for me they are the gatekeepers :bowdown:
I couldn't get a straight answer out of him.

Question - Also, any comment re: the fact that the FBI doesn't apostille documents? I actually saw on the web site of the Dept. of State that they will apostille a U.S. gov't. document, but that will require even more time...

Answer - I saw the same thing, and then I believe someone on this site said they would not do it. As I mentioned in my post, I am going to try with the State Police, but ask for the FBI as a backup.

Question - Not according to the UFMS website. They say you need the financial records even for temporary residence


My wife was also told the same thing and the amount was 5752 roubles a month times 36.

Answer - According to what he told us, that requirement was scraped this year. However, it may still be on the website. I am just going on what he told me. As I mentioned in my post, it appears that different offices are following different rules. :verymad:

My goal was to verify as much as I could the official rules, so it doesn't get bounced down the line. However, my local OVIR or your local OVIR could force us to jump through extra hoops which are no longer required. In that case, I probably won't fight them because it probably cost more time and money than complying with their un-required requirements.

Forms - A friend of mine found copies of the forms on a website. I am going to compare the form that they gave and the form I have to verify that they are the same if so I will post. However, I do not know if you have to apply using the official form or if you can use copies.

I have gotten a lot of good advice on this forum, and I am happy to return the favor. :)

Bels
17-11-2007, 20:20
Surfsup, would you say the best advice is go straight to your local OVIR and ask, as you did? Also this apostil problem, no problem for Britain as the have their Foreign affairs off ice and follow what we were told THE HAGUE CONVENTION. Perhaps USA doesn't follow this internationally agreed Hague Convention whare all documents must be apostiled. If your country doesn;'t follow this Hague convention then they must get their documents apostiled in Russia, I thinks i'ts the department for Foreign Affairs. That's what my wife tells me coming from discussions with our local OVIR.

Bels
17-11-2007, 22:33
Questions - As I understand, he couldn't/didn't tell you if medical exams could be done at a local Western clinic?

Answer - He referred me back to my local OVIR. The issue is that as I mention in my post I will be applying for temporary residence in St. Petersburg because that is where my in-laws live. I hope to go next week, and start the process. My first stop is my local OVIR. I have a bunch of questions for them, because for me they are the gatekeepers :bowdown:
I couldn't get a straight answer out of him.

Question - Also, any comment re: the fact that the FBI doesn't apostille documents? I actually saw on the web site of the Dept. of State that they will apostille a U.S. gov't. document, but that will require even more time...

Answer - I saw the same thing, and then I believe someone on this site said they would not do it. As I mentioned in my post, I am going to try with the State Police, but ask for the FBI as a backup.

Question - Not according to the UFMS website. They say you need the financial records even for temporary residence


My wife was also told the same thing and the amount was 5752 roubles a month times 36.

Answer - According to what he told us, that requirement was scraped this year. However, it may still be on the website. I am just going on what he told me. As I mentioned in my post, it appears that different offices are following different rules. :verymad:

My goal was to verify as much as I could the official rules, so it doesn't get bounced down the line. However, my local OVIR or your local OVIR could force us to jump through extra hoops which are no longer required. In that case, I probably won't fight them because it probably cost more time and money than complying with their un-required requirements.

Forms - A friend of mine found copies of the forms on a website. I am going to compare the form that they gave and the form I have to verify that they are the same if so I will post. However, I do not know if you have to apply using the official form or if you can use copies.

I have gotten a lot of good advice on this forum, and I am happy to return the favor. :)

Whats your problem by not going through the Russian system of medicals. Why Western? It's probably going to cost you a fortune any way, and complications with communication. Why don't you go through the Russian system like I did. Why put more problems on yourself. Just follow the system that you receive from OVIR. Believe me you will have enough problems, without increasing them on yourselves

VladSkywolf
18-11-2007, 04:59
Surfsup, would you say the best advice is go straight to your local OVIR and ask, as you did? Also this apostil problem, no problem for Britain as the have their Foreign affairs off ice and follow what we were told THE HAGUE CONVENTION. Perhaps USA doesn't follow this internationally agreed Hague Convention whare all documents must be apostiled. If your country doesn;'t follow this Hague convention then they must get their documents apostiled in Russia, I thinks i'ts the department for Foreign Affairs. That's what my wife tells me coming from discussions with our local OVIR.

Except that, as I understand it, Russia won't Apostille foreign documents, otherwise what's the sense?

Btw, USA is a signatory of THE HAGUE CONVENTION treaty so you can get an Apostille on documents, it's just that each state has their own agency that is responsible for this.

VladSkywolf
18-11-2007, 05:11
Whats your problem by not going through the Russian system of medicals. Why Western? It's probably going to cost you a fortune any way, and complications with communication. Why don't you go through the Russian system like I did. Why put more problems on yourself. Just follow the system that you receive from OVIR. Believe me you will have enough problems, without increasing them on yourselves

I agree with Bels. You won't be getting any additional benefit from going to a Western clinic, I mean, it's not like you're going to be treated for anything.

I went to the local clinics and paid a total of 3300 rubles: 400 for AIDS, 300 for chest X-ray, and 2600 for the remaining tests. Other than the line I stood on to get my blood taken (they had a new staffer that day) everything was relatively quick and painless. :)

VladSkywolf
18-11-2007, 05:18
My wife was also told the same thing and the amount was 5752 roubles a month times 36.

And I was told 5000 x 36, but that was back in July/August, maybe by now the new rules have made their way to them.

I figure I'll just bring it anyway - I'm tracking my Apostilled criminal history as we 'speak', so barring any 'lost in the mail' issues, I'll be submitting my application this week!

VladSkywolf
18-11-2007, 06:08
Also, any comment re: the fact that the FBI doesn't apostille documents? I actually saw on the web site of the Dept. of State that they will apostille a U.S. gov't. document, but that will require even more time...



I also explored this avenue, but the following dissuaded me:


(from Dept of State website)

Documents requiring certifications with an apostille by the U.S. Department of State are those that have been signed by a federal official with the official Seal of that agency, American Consular Officer, Military Notary (10 USC 1044a) or Foreign Consul (Diplomat Officials must be registered with the Office of Protocol). Note: These documents must include the official's title and his/her signature must be legible. Please also note that the U.S. Department of State will not issue an apostille for State-issued documents.

I can tell you for certain (since I'm looking at mine right now) that no one at the FBI signs their report, nor do they put their seal on it. You may have a problem trying to get them to put an Apostille on this.

I'll try to include reduced jpegs of what I have. The first image is of the note they attach to the fingerprint card (form FD-258). The second image is the back of the fingerprint card, where they put a stamp that says "No arrest record".

The purpose of an Apostille is to verify a signature, whether a notary's or an official's. Since there is no signature, it's doubtful an Apostille can be obtained for this document.

Proper Bostonian
18-11-2007, 09:01
Thanks all for the info.

My local Ovir where I'm registered (S. Butovo) told me I have to go to another location (Lomonosovsky) to do temp registration. However, when I met with the Deputy Director in Butovo she called to confirm that bank info is no longer req'd.

Why use a western clinic? True, 10,000 rubles is a hefty price for all those tests, but they can be done in one place! I called the med ctr. listed for the SW region and was told there are 3 different places one has to go to for all the tests. That's means 6 trips total - once to go to ea. place, a 2nd trip to pick up all the results. And, they do not give appts. Personally, I'd rather pay than go through the aggrevation, if I have the chance.

BTW, I found this web site that lists all approved Russian med. ctrs. for those in need.

(http://www.ufmsrf.ru/med.html)

I'm way behind you VladSkyWalker as I'll only be sending my fingerprints to the States next wk. Since the FBI doesn't accept credit cards for expedited service, I'll 1st have to send them to family and have them forward them on with a money order or certified check. However, I plan on calling the State Dept re: apostilling the FBI history.

Very strange that Mr. Mashakov of Ovir HQ had no comment for SurfsUp re: lack of FBI apostille. Surely, they must have dealt with Americans before and encountered this issue.

A friend of my husband's photographed the list of requirements at his local Ovir. Not sure how to post a photo here. Will try later. But a couple of funny requirements in addition to the 2 self-addressed envelopes, are a cardboard papka, 2 "files" (those plastics things), and a post card. Hubby went to a stationary store uncertain what to buy. Clerk asked if he needed them for Ovir & knew exactly what to give him.

Thanks again for great info everyone.

Bels
18-11-2007, 19:02
Interesting thread, and interesting posts. There are also some interesting posts in other threads of the same subject. The biggest barrier appears to be the apostiled police check.

Good luck British, Americans and Australians. I'm not forgetting that there are other nationalities involved in this application, but these are the main nationalities communicating here.

Hopefully when you all successfully complete the applications you will let expat.ru know all facts to collate for others in the future.

At the moment the Americans appear to have it more complicated.

mefistofele
18-11-2007, 20:30
I assume that a letter from the FBI stating that they don't apostille documents won't do the trick?

FBI Identification Record Request (http://www.fbi.gov/hq/cjisd/faqs.html)


4. Does the FBI *apostille?

(*An apostille is a document that has been "legalized" or "authenticated"
by the issuing agency. This is a process in which various seals are
placed on the document.)

No, the FBI does not apostille. If an apostille is requested, the CJIS
Division will provide a letter stating that this service is not provided.

Bels
18-11-2007, 21:13
I assume that a letter from the FBI stating that they don't apostille documents won't do the trick?

FBI Identification Record Request (http://www.fbi.gov/hq/cjisd/faqs.html)

Ok, I do understand that the United States appears to be more complicated than say UK. Scotland yard or Metropoliton police won't apostil either, and asked the question they didn't comment to me. Why? because the document they gave me they believe and took the the trouble to ensure it was authentic, and who can argue with Scotland Yard, known throughout the world for centuries.

However there is a department of Foreign affairs where you return your police check in the UK, surely that applies to the US. Of course the FBI can't apostil their own documents and it's not their place to do so, just like Scotland yard didn't answer my question. I had to find out for myself. So just a guess in regards to the Americans, do you send your your received police to a department of Affairs to be apostilled. But whatever, there must be a separate deprtment who deals with the apostil. It's common sense.

Hopefully for Brits you have remembered both addresses I have given. First you get your police check, and when you receive it , return it to the foreign affairs to get apostilled. That's it.

Bels
18-11-2007, 21:32
Slightly off topic :) The innternet is flooded about Americans intending to marry Russian women, in fact much more flooded of Brits on the same subject. From simply marrying them, to live in Russia, or taking them to USA. Long drawn out and very complex., Do the Americans not know of the expression "Let's put all the facts in a nutshell" :)

Well let;'s try and do this in expat.ru. Because the Americans are doing a very good job here. Eventually one of them is going to get through and we will collct all the fact of his experience. And when we do I recommend we put it together in a nutshell as the facts for Americans and put it as a sticky.
And that should go for Brits and Australians, which for the moment appears more logical.

Somebody please condense these facts, because many have been very useful. Just a bit more work for the Americans for the time being.

mefistofele
18-11-2007, 21:43
Yup, so I suppose American simply need to:
1) Get the FBI record
2) Get a letter from the FBI saying they don't apostille docs
3) Send these to the Office of Authentications (http://www.state.gov/m/a/auth/) with $7 to get the apostille...

Bels
18-11-2007, 21:52
Yup, so I suppose American simply need to:
1) Get the FBI record
2) Get a letter from the FBI saying they don't apostille docs
3) Send these to the Office of Authentications (http://www.state.gov/m/a/auth/) with $7 to get the apostille...

That's a nutshell :) AGREED ! Well I hope you all agree. But I'm sure sure somebody is going to say it's not as simple as that OH! NO! Just like this damn 90 day visa rule, just when everyone comes up with a solution. Somebody states but just look what I have experienced. OH! NO Here we go again :eh:

jeremiah1516
19-11-2007, 01:48
The purpose of an Apostille is to verify a signature, whether a notary's or an official's. Since there is no signature, it's doubtful an Apostille can be obtained for this document.[/QUOTE]

I am in the US and am currently assisting family members in Russia in obtaining apostilles for documents in order to apply for temporary residency. Regarding apostilles for FBI criminal history records, a woman in the NC Authentication Office of the Secretary of State told me to have the FBI criminal history records notarized and then sent to her office to obtain apostilles. BTW, apostilles authenticate documents, not signatures. See the following link for more info about apostilles and a list of State Authentication Authorities: Authentication of Documents For Use Abroad (http://travel.state.gov/family/abduction/hague_issues/hague_issues_562.html)
If you are a US citizen in Russia, have your family in the US contact the Authentication Authority in your state in order to determine how your state handles apostilles for FBI criminal history records.

VladSkywolf
19-11-2007, 03:42
BTW, apostilles authenticate documents, not signatures.


Apostilles authenticate signatures on documents, not the content of the document. Are you telling me that the issuing authority is going to verify the facts on, for example, a criminal history report? No, of course not, but they will authenticate the signature and seal on the document, which by extension authenticates the document.



Regarding apostilles for FBI criminal history records, a woman in the NC Authentication Office of the Secretary of State told me to have the FBI criminal history records notarized and then sent to her office to obtain apostilles.


You have made my point with this statement. The authentication office will apostille (authenticate) the notarized FBI report, which has the signature of the notary. I have in fact previously made a similar suggestion on another post, to sign an affidavit swearing to the authenticity of the document, having this affidavit notarized (with the attached FBI report), then sending this to the authentication office for an Apostille. This will work - what won't work is trying to have them apostille the FBI report by itself.

By the way, I talked directly with the issuing agency in my state which is where I got my information from. In no uncertain terms, I was told they authenticate the signatures on documents, and that outside of a certain set of state officials (e.g., judges, court clerks, legislative, etc) they can only apostille documents that are notarized - because they can authenticate these signatures.

In my previous post I quoted the U.S. Dept of State, here is the direct link so you can see for yourself:

Apostille Requirements (http://www.state.gov/m/a/auth/c16921.htm)

BrianS
19-11-2007, 11:20
My wife was also told the same thing and the amount was 5752 roubles a month times 36.

I was required only to show a Russian bank account with at least 15000 rubles in it.

BrianS
19-11-2007, 11:26
Apostilles authenticate signatures on documents, not the content of the document. Are you telling me that the issuing authority is going to verify the facts on, for example, a criminal history report? No, of course not, but they will authenticate the signature and seal on the document, which by extension authenticates the document.



You have made my point with this statement. The authentication office will apostille (authenticate) the notarized FBI report, which has the signature of the notary. I have in fact previously made a similar suggestion on another post, to sign an affidavit swearing to the authenticity of the document, having this affidavit notarized (with the attached FBI report), then sending this to the authentication office for an Apostille. This will work - what won't work is trying to have them apostille the FBI report by itself.

By the way, I talked directly with the issuing agency in my state which is where I got my information from. In no uncertain terms, I was told they authenticate the signatures on documents, and that outside of a certain set of state officials (e.g., judges, court clerks, legislative, etc) they can only apostille documents that are notarized - because they can authenticate these signatures.

In my previous post I quoted the U.S. Dept of State, here is the direct link so you can see for yourself:

Apostille Requirements (http://www.state.gov/m/a/auth/c16921.htm)

What you say is exactly true and correct! I was able to mail my State Police ciminal record check to the apostille office in my home state and because it was from a certain offical with her signature they could apostille it with no problems otherwise they said to get a document apostilled by them that you just had to have it notorized in their state and they could apostille the notarized document.

russiabear
26-11-2007, 12:27
Proper Bostonian.. did the West Virginia FBI office tell you how long it would take for you to receive the FBI criminal report after they received your fingerprints?? How much more $$ was it to have it expedited?? ($18.00 is the basic fee correct??)
Sincere Thanks for any info!

Proper Bostonian
26-11-2007, 12:47
$18 is the fee for fingerprints. They will not tell you how long it will take. You can REQUEST expedited service (see instructions on their web site), but there is NO guarantee. AND, they will not accept credit cards for expedited service which kind of screwed me up forcing me to Express Mail my fingerprints to my father who will then send them to the FBI with a certified check or money order. I gave them a month in my request for expediting figuring the holidays would interfere. Let's hope for the best!

rotyn
26-11-2007, 13:41
So how about this sh** with own property. Means you cant get a temp residency without owned apartment?

What about those having only rented an apartment?

Regards
Rudy

Bels
26-11-2007, 19:41
So how about this sh** with own property. Means you cant get a temp residency without owned apartment?

What about those having only rented an apartment?

Regards
Rudy

Rented ok for temporary.But the landlord must go with you to a lawyer and sign a document. Can be confusing for the OVIR, but yes you can do it. Take it from my expert wife, she's an expert in this area. Why? because she's been a tour and always solving others problems in this area. Foreign and Russian. And she managed my residency and has done a magnificent job :)

She simply keeps asking questions to OVIR, and other local authorities.

raydg
30-11-2007, 10:55
I was required only to show a Russian bank account with at least 15000 rubles in it.
Our local OVIR requires enough for 3 years. From what I have seen here, different offices see same laws differently.

Bels
30-11-2007, 11:38
Our local OVIR requires enough for 3 years. From what I have seen here, different offices see same laws differently.

I have'nt noticed any law about a three year income saved. Obviously
there has to be an income somewhere and awkward if you can't legally work without a work visa. Perhaps my wife's income was taken into consideration.

raydg
02-12-2007, 20:32
It wasn't laws, but what the OVIR told us on Friday that I had to have. Also my wife is on maturnity leave for a while and even if she was at work, her requirements were even higher. All this bites

Bels
02-12-2007, 20:43
Just go ahead and put your applcation in. Keep going forward and sometime don't worry what you are told by who you spoke. Just tell them you want your application processed now. Those women at the desks are often wrong.

I'll give you an example, I was told I need my bith certificate which also had to be apostiled and translated. We told them just to go ahead with the application, because I had lost my patience by that time. I got my residency eventually without the birth certificate.

My advice is keep pushing and get that application through. I have the impression some of them are looking for a bribe. Just tell them to get on with it. If you are married its your right.

Clean32
02-12-2007, 20:45
The purpose of an Apostille is to verify a signature, whether a notary's or an official's. Since there is no signature, it's doubtful an Apostille can be obtained for this document.

Sorry thats a good discription of a Notary.

Appossed is an international Law. "Convention De la Hage 1965" i think

It is an intergovermnt agreement that the siad apposeld document should be taken at face value.
an example would be an apposeld american birth certificate, the RF goverment has already agreed to accept this document as Fact, becouse its apposeld. IE in short its the content that is aposeld. and again its a goverment to goverment agreement for goverment confurmed document. IE the US govemnet Confurms that the deatils in this american birth certificat are correct.

Bels
02-12-2007, 21:34
But you don't have to have a birth certificate if all your other documents are okay. But to prevent any arguments with local OVIR. (Sorry I'm sticking to OVIR name as it's been changed or not, it doesn't matter). That,s the name that Russians or expats still to continue to go by.Then if you have already got your birth certificate, get it apostilled and translated , even though if they didn't know the rules put it it in any way to shut them up. Just keep moving and get that application done, no matter what.

Yes, I feel feel for you , and some of you are not used to such an in-efficient service and things do go much slower is. In Russia, that's the way it is. Us Brits and possibly Americans are used to fast efficiency in their own countries. Well sorry that doesn't happen in Russia. They're slow, reluctant and appear to be looking for bribes, or they simply feel under paid. That's the way it is and we have to put up with it.

My advice is just keep moving forward as much as you can. When you can do what you can do just demand you want your application processed NOW!

Guest
02-12-2007, 23:13
NO birth certificate is required for residence permit. Never. It is required only for citizenship.



Just go ahead and put your applcation in. Keep going forward and sometime don't worry what you are told by who you spoke. Just tell them you want your application processed now. Those women at the desks are often wrong.

I'll give you an example, I was told I need my bith certificate which also had to be apostiled and translated. We told them just to go ahead with the application, because I had lost my patience by that time. I got my residency eventually without the birth certificate.

My advice is keep pushing and get that application through. I have the impression some of them are looking for a bribe. Just tell them to get on with it. If you are married its your right.

Bels
02-12-2007, 23:18
Thanks for confirmation Guest , it's always welcome. But staff of OVIR may well try it on. :)

Guest
02-12-2007, 23:39
Ask FMS (new name for OVIR) the list of requested documents and it should not mention the birth certificate. If they say so, politely tell "But I called to central FMS on Ordinka street and they said that no BC is required".

Do not think FMS try to get bribes for this, it is not correct. Maybe to "speed" the process, but not about (non) requested documents.

raydg
03-12-2007, 12:41
Just go ahead and put your applcation in. Keep going forward and sometime don't worry what you are told by who you spoke. Just tell them you want your application processed now. Those women at the desks are often wrong.

I'll give you an example, I was told I need my bith certificate which also had to be apostiled and translated. We told them just to go ahead with the application, because I had lost my patience by that time. I got my residency eventually without the birth certificate.

My advice is keep pushing and get that application through. I have the impression some of them are looking for a bribe. Just tell them to get on with it. If you are married its your right.

We are pushing it through. Just to let you know that it was the guy who runs the local OVIR that told us this information. He does know about my wife being Russian and us having a newborn. And he referred us to a bulletin board with the procedure for residency laid out.

Bels
03-12-2007, 14:38
Ask FMS (new name for OVIR) the list of requested documents and it should not mention the birth certificate. If they say so, politely tell "But I called to central FMS on Ordinka street and they said that no BC is required".

Do not think FMS try to get bribes for this, it is not correct. Maybe to "speed" the process, but not about (non) requested documents.

You may have a good point there. So if you already have an apostiled birth certificate, stick it in anyway. As it might help the staff with extra evidence, and in respect help speed up the process in application.

The process in my application took almost seven months. But if the birth certificate was provided it might have helped more and the process might have three or four months instead of seven months.

Guest
03-12-2007, 19:06
The process in my application took almost seven months. But if the birth certificate was provided it might have helped more and the process might have three or four months instead of seven months.


No, the BC has no incidence at all as nobody cares about it at the Central FMS. If the local FMS guys are serious and know their job, they will look at it and will give it back to you as it is not requested in the application.

7 months is a 'usual' time frame... Sad but real.

Bels
03-12-2007, 19:25
As you are here Guest. For those applying for the residency would you advise the applicants to be on a personal invitation? Due to current circumstances.

Unfortunately they will have to go back to their country every three months to renew their visas. But that's the way it is unfortunately.

Bels
03-12-2007, 19:44
Sorry, I've just given my previous post some thought, as everybodies peronal situation. So let's exclude the ones who are properly and legally employed here either with a work permit. Or as a teacher with an employer who can invite foreigners. These people won't have a problem.

It's those people who are stuck with this 90 day in and out problem. Now they have got a big problem if they are married and have children here for example.

Taking from previous posts and my pm's, different people have different problems.

Also for those not married, difficulties are increasing. Due to the increasing number of ex-soviets put under pressure to get residency, and those people will have peference in the quota in comparison to a Brit or an American for example.

Guest
03-12-2007, 19:51
As you are here Guest. For those applying for the residency would you advise the applicants to be on a personal invitation? Due to current circumstances.

Unfortunately they will have to go back to their country every three months to renew their visas. But that's the way it is unfortunately.


Why a personal invitation? ANY visa is ok to apply for residence permit, business visa or tourism visa, etc.


Now, about invitations, don't forget that to get a tourism visa it is not obligatory to get the invitation through an agency! ANY Russian citizen can issue an invitation very quickly, since September or October (not sure of the date). Of course visa service agencies will tell you that you MUST get an "agency invitation". This is FALSE.

I don't work in FMS, so don't know exactly in which formulation must be done the invitation, maybe some here know this? But the information is sure at 200%.

Back to the RP: So ANY visa is OK to apply, as you just need to be here to do the medical tests and supply the documents. If you organize well and go with a Russian friend (just to arrange the things, don't queue too much, etc, distribute chocolates :) etc) to the medic tests, all can be done in 3 weeks and even less: tests, results, attestation, and submission of the documents.

Then you may leave Russia, and when your RP is ready, come back to get it stamped in your passport (It means a NEW visa, yes, but even a tourist visa of one week is ok, even 3 days in theory!).

Guest
03-12-2007, 19:54
Yes it is true, the new law makes people in trouble, especially those who are married with a Russian girl, have kids, etc.

> those people will have peference in the quota in comparison to a Brit or an American for example.

(ex-CCCP): Yes and no. To speak frankly, the FMS guys prefer see a Western citizen than a ex-CCCP apply for a RP. So, PLAY WITH IT!




Sorry, I've just given my previous post some thought, as everybodies peronal situation. So let's exclude the ones who are properly and legally employed here either with a work permit. Or as a teacher with an employer who can invite foreigners. These people won't have a problem.

It's those people who are stuck with this 90 day in and out problem. Now they have got a big problem if they are married and have children here for example.

Taking from previous posts and my pm's, different people have different problems.

Also for those not married, difficulties are increasing. Due to the increasing number of ex-soviets put under pressure to get residency, and those people will have peference in the quota in comparison to a Brit or an American for example.

Bels
03-12-2007, 20:03
Another big issue in reference to previous posts, and yes I do believe the questions should be repeated until such time it gets through to people.

And that big issue is that many want an agent to make the application easier. First of all is it really necessary if you have your Russian spouse to assist. Yes they have a lot of hard work ahead of them.

Now I suggested to my wife that she would make a perfect agent, and fully qualified on this kind of work. Fluent in English and native Russian, and used to negotiating with Russian authorities and British authorities. But her answer was no way. Its a lot of hard work and the fee is bound to unrealistic and with expats not realising how much time is involved.

Another point in this issue, many expats are hoping there might be an agent that can guarantee to speed up the process, perhaps for application to be completed within three months. Now if there is such an agent, that agent will be worth a lot of money. And I'm sure this agent will make a lot of money. However I don't believe they exist.

Guest
03-12-2007, 20:20
Bells,

There are 2 things:

1- A person to help for the process,
and
2- A person to speed the process!

For the 1st, the person should go with the applicant to queue at the medical tests! If the applicant is alone with a poor Russian language and a Western mentality (no offence!), he will spend HOURS on queue.
Do you think ANY so-called "agent" will go to queue with you? For sure NO! He will just take a few thousands of bucks from you and will tell you "Go there and bring me the papers back"!!!

For the second, a so-called "agent" can sometimes speed the process, but we have to admit - and I know a lot of them, that is why I do NOT recommend them! - that they will take a lot of money to MAYBE save 4 or 6 weeks. Not more, OR you would get a NON-REGISTERED residence permit. Here, you cross the red line!

So, who can be the FIRST person? A Russian friend, simply! Who must have free time to go with you. You will give him for example $500 and he will go with you for all tests. ALL means 3 hospitals, 3 times Sberbank to pay, plus the final attestation 2 times, well... $500 is a good price! An "agent" will begin to deal at really more, and WILL NEVER GO WITH YOU! Imagine you are alone, speaking just DA NET and IA NE ZNAYU", queuing among dozens of ex-CCCP :)

Who can be the SECOND person? This is more hard, it should be a guy having a job that allows him to call to FMS and tell that you are in a hurry, etc. no need to call or go every day there, you will just make the FMS guys nervous against you!

As you see, in no case an "agent" can make the job...

Bels
03-12-2007, 20:39
Thanks for some very good posts Guest. You have now confirmed that I have basicaly provided the correct advice on my previous posts, and my pm's. But you have been more specific. And my knowledge is due to personal experience and the expert assistance of my wife.

Clean32
03-12-2007, 20:48
Why a personal invitation? ANY visa is ok to apply for residence permit, business visa or tourism visa, etc.


Now, about invitations, don't forget that to get a tourism visa it is not obligatory to get the invitation through an agency! ANY Russian citizen can issue an invitation very quickly, since September or October (not sure of the date). Of course visa service agencies will tell you that you MUST get an "agency invitation". This is FALSE.

I don't work in FMS, so don't know exactly in which formulation must be done the invitation, maybe some here know this? But the information is sure at 200%.

Back to the RP: So ANY visa is OK to apply, as you just need to be here to do the medical tests and supply the documents. If you organize well and go with a Russian friend (just to arrange the things, don't queue too much, etc, distribute chocolates :) etc) to the medic tests, all can be done in 3 weeks and even less: tests, results, attestation, and submission of the documents.

Then you may leave Russia, and when your RP is ready, come back to get it stamped in your passport (It means a NEW visa, yes, but even a tourist visa of one week is ok, even 3 days in theory!).

invitation can be writen on a bit of toilet paper, must have names adreesess of both paries dtaes of birth and passport numbers. and it must state it is an ivitation and for how long for.

Clean32
03-12-2007, 20:51
Bells,

There are 2 things:

1- A person to help for the process,
and
2- A person to speed the process!

For the 1st, the person should go with the applicant to queue at the medical tests! If the applicant is alone with a poor Russian language and a Western mentality (no offence!), he will spend HOURS on queue.
Do you think ANY so-called "agent" will go to queue with you? For sure NO! He will just take a few thousands of bucks from you and will tell you "Go there and bring me the papers back"!!!

For the second, a so-called "agent" can sometimes speed the process, but we have to admit - and I know a lot of them, that is why I do NOT recommend them! - that they will take a lot of money to MAYBE save 4 or 6 weeks. Not more, OR you would get a NON-REGISTERED residence permit. Here, you cross the red line!

So, who can be the FIRST person? A Russian friend, simply! Who must have free time to go with you. You will give him for example $500 and he will go with you for all tests. ALL means 3 hospitals, 3 times Sberbank to pay, plus the final attestation 2 times, well... $500 is a good price! An "agent" will begin to deal at really more, and WILL NEVER GO WITH YOU! Imagine you are alone, speaking just DA NET and IA NE ZNAYU", queuing among dozens of ex-CCCP :)

Who can be the SECOND person? This is more hard, it should be a guy having a job that allows him to call to FMS and tell that you are in a hurry, etc. no need to call or go every day there, you will just make the FMS guys nervous against you!

As you see, in no case an "agent" can make the job...

Good post
As a friend i would recoment any Girl say in her 50s that knows the soviet line shuffle, and how to hassel on the phone.

Bels
03-12-2007, 21:06
Why a personal invitation? ANY visa is ok to apply for residence permit, business visa or tourism visa, etc.


Now, about invitations, don't forget that to get a tourism visa it is not obligatory to get the invitation through an agency! ANY Russian citizen can issue an invitation very quickly, since September or October (not sure of the date). Of course visa service agencies will tell you that you MUST get an "agency invitation". This is FALSE.

I don't work in FMS, so don't know exactly in which formulation must be done the invitation, maybe some here know this? But the information is sure at 200%.

Back to the RP: So ANY visa is OK to apply, as you just need to be here to do the medical tests and supply the documents. If you organize well and go with a Russian friend (just to arrange the things, don't queue too much, etc, distribute chocolates :) etc) to the medic tests, all can be done in 3 weeks and even less: tests, results, attestation, and submission of the documents.

Then you may leave Russia, and when your RP is ready, come back to get it stamped in your passport (It means a NEW visa, yes, but even a tourist visa of one week is ok, even 3 days in theory!).

In answer to your why a personal invitation??

Now I don't want to confuse people. But in reference to many confused posts of the visa issue. 90 days in! and 90 days out! now that's the problem. Please confirm this problem exists. And if it does ,then is it not better to go for personal invitation. And then when your 3 months is up you leave the country and return to Russia with in a matter of days. Hopefully there is not now a 90 days in, and a ninety days out with a personal invitation.

Now let's not forget that I'm no longer affected by such situations with the new laws. And I might now be out of date.

Bels
03-12-2007, 21:16
Now if I am correct, that mean that the private invitation is the best choice. Because I repeat , you can return to the country after you have renewed your personal invitation, within a few days.There will be no ninety days in and 90 days out.

paco
23-02-2008, 19:12
If married to a Russian Citizen Marriage to a Russian is not required, however if you are married to a Russian citizen then you are exempt from the quota system (Each Russian Region has a set quota for the number of temporary residences to be allowed. You may apply as many times as you want. However, Moscow only has 1500 slots and you will be behind the CIS people.



:rules:


Has anyone here successfully gotten temporary residency via the quota system? Considering that I don't meet any of the exemptions (which, again, are a., marriage to russian national b., having previous russ. citizenship c., having dependent child in russia d., having dependent parent in russia), I'm wondering if it's even worth applying. Any tips? Could a spot be, er, bought? Should one apply for a work permit/visa instead?


Any suggestion/tips/ for those who are not married to a Russian citizen and wish to apply for Temp Res ?

Bels
23-02-2008, 22:14
Any suggestion/tips/ for those who are not married to a Russian citizen and wish to apply for Temp Res ?

Yes, go to your FMS(OVIR) office and ask for the application, and ask some questions. Ask some questions, and just go for it. Ther's no other way. I wish you all the best.

Surfsup37
25-02-2008, 00:41
Any suggestion/tips/ for those who are not married to a Russian citizen and wish to apply for Temp Res ?

Paco,

I don't have much hope for you if you live in Moscow. However, outside of Moscow, you will have a much better chance, since you are not competing against so many people.


Good luck.

kapione
25-02-2008, 09:39
now this is information everyone can use !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Bels
25-02-2008, 09:55
Paco,

I don't have much hope for you if you live in Moscow. However, outside of Moscow, you will have a much better chance, since you are not competing against so many people.


Good luck.

You don't know of your chances until you take that first step to your local FMS(OVIR) and ask. There is a quota, and perhaps because everyone is thinking negative of there isn't much point in applying, you might just get in.

Bels
25-02-2008, 10:01
It would be nice to hear of any one has successfully applied for temporary or permanent residential, of who are not married.

Are there any members here who have successfully made their application for residency ? And are not married to a Russian ?

Jen
21-08-2008, 02:47
Sorry to revive an old, though very useful thread, but I was wondering if anybody could answer my question.

I'm a little confused about the order in which I have to notarise, translate and apostille UK documents, and even which documents need to be notarised.

I see from a link to the FCO that I found somewhere in another thread on these forums that they legalize translated copies of documents. Do I have to translate my passport, Criminal record check, and maybe birth certificate first and then get these legalized, or do I have to legalize the English language version of the documents and get them translated later in Russia?

Also, do the police check and birth cert need to be notarised first before I go to the FCO?

Thank you in advance to anyone who can help me.

Bels
21-08-2008, 14:08
Sorry to revive an old, though very useful thread, but I was wondering if anybody could answer my question.

I'm a little confused about the order in which I have to notarise, translate and apostille UK documents, and even which documents need to be notarised.

I see from a link to the FCO that I found somewhere in another thread on these forums that they legalize translated copies of documents. Do I have to translate my passport, Criminal record check, and maybe birth certificate first and then get these legalized, or do I have to legalize the English language version of the documents and get them translated later in Russia?

Also, do the police check and birth cert need to be notarised first before I go to the FCO?



Thank you in advance to anyone who can help me.


For TRP you don't need a birth certificate. But you do need your criminal record check. When you receive it, it will be in English of course. It then needs to be sent back to your country to be legallised. This would be the ministry of Foreign affairs. When you receive your legalised crimianal record, you then get it translated in Russia. You should find an aproved address at you FMS.

For your police check or subject access as they call it click here Metropolitan Police Service - Your rights to information index (http://www.met.police.uk/information/info_about_you.htm)

For legalisatioin of documents it's the Foreign & Commonwealth office

Documents we can legalise (http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/about-the-fco/what-we-do/docs-and-legal-services/legalisation/legalising)

ezik
21-08-2008, 14:16
Also, inform at your embassy once you have applied for the criminal record check. Documents like the criminal record check are basically standard documents. And some embassies already have standard translations. They are not notarised, of course, but could save you some time and/or money when you go to a translation office.

Note that the criminal record check needs an apostille, which should be from your home country.

Bels
21-08-2008, 14:33
Also, inform at your embassy once you have applied for the criminal record check. Documents like the criminal record check are basically standard documents. And some embassies already have standard translations. They are not notarised, of course, but could save you some time and/or money when you go to a translation office.

Note that the criminal record check needs an apostille, which should be from your home country.

To avoid confusion: Britain officially calls apostill legalisation in the UK. It's the same, so Brits, please don't try to do both :)

The British Embassy can no longer handle getting your police check or subject access form. Due to new laws in data protection, you are the only one who can apply to the police for this document.

What Ezik is saying may well be correct for other nationalities, but it no longer applies to Brits. Because I tried it, and it didn't work.

If you are applying for police check in Russia, you can download an application form from the link I provided you.

jcmuro
11-09-2008, 14:13
Notarized copy of apartment ownership document where you are to be registered (You do need to own property. For example, I am using my in-laws apartment. However, if you do own property than follow these same rules)

Is there a typo in the sentence "You do need to own property" where supposedly it was meant to be "Yoy do NOT need to own property" ??

Surfsup37
11-09-2008, 15:17
That is a typo. Someone looking to obtain a TRP does not need to own property.

However, the problem is that you need somewhere where you can be registered in the district in which you intend to live and work.

The vast majority of landlords will not allow a foreigner to do so. Therefore, you then need to prevail upon the good graces of someone who does own property in Russia.

Good luck.

Judge
26-09-2008, 22:35
I have made this thread a sticky, it will save people time digging through old threads.
If anyone has new info which isn't in this thread, please post,it will help others out.

Thanks.

nikomo
28-09-2008, 20:00
I am planning to eshtablish a business in Moscow. Client I have and doing business I have good experience. But business visa is not enough to stay permanetly in Russian.

So, can somebody tell me, if I establish a "ooo" (limited liablitity company) enough to get "investor" status. I understood that investors can apply residence permit.

Thanks in advance.

afcjungle
19-02-2009, 00:16
I heard a guy got his temporary in three weeks.
Has anybody out here heard anything similar?

reckor
07-03-2009, 01:29
Is this Tutorial still valid nowadays?

Anna Sahakyan
22-04-2009, 15:26
oh many thing has changed since this tutorial.
Temporary residence permit
According to article 2 of the Federal Law No. 115-FZ, dated 25 July, 2002, On the Legal Status of Foreign Citizens in the Russian Federation (further Law on foreigners) - temporary residence permit (further TRP) grants right to the foreign citizen to reside temporarily in the Russian Federation until receipt of a permanent residency and is drawn up in the form of an entry in the identity document of the foreign citizen.
Foreigner that has obtained TRP, is still obliged to obtain work permit to be employed in Russia. If you are a foreigner working as an employee without having a work permit, and get caught, you would be deported and refused entry in future.
However, a foreigner that has a TRP is free to enter and reside in Russia without visa. Only on departure from Russia he has to obtain single exit visa. This visa is issued for four months and is shown on the border when entering Russia.
Russia has a quota for the number of temporary residence permits it issues every year. The quota for 2009 is 200345 and it is divided among the regions of the Federation. Moscow City is allowed just 1500. In comparison, the Moscow Oblast has 10000.
Those born in the USSR or Russian Federation, married to Russian citizen, or making certain types of investments in Russia are eligible to apply for temporary residency with no concern for quotas. The rest can only start to apply for temporary residency if the years quota for their region has not been filled.
Every new year, there is a new quota established by the Government of the Russian Federation. But once you are in as a temporary resident, you do not have to worry about quotas again.
TRP is issued for three years (point 1, article 6 Law on foreigners).
A foreign citizen can apply for TRP in the territorial body of the Federal Migration Service (further FMS). During the 6 months term FMS considers the application and decides whether to issue TRP for a certain foreign citizen or no, the decision on refusal to issue TRP should be motivated. Exhaustion of quota is also the reason for refusal.
Application for obtaining TRP is to be filed personally in the district of FMS of the prospective place of residence (where foreigner owns or rents estate). A certain number of documents stipulated by the laws is to be attached to the application.
After one year of temporary residence foreigner can apply for Permanent Residency.
Permanent Residency:
Permanent residency grants right to the foreign citizen to reside permanently in the Russian Federation and the right of the free entry to and exit from the Russian Federation.
Once a foreign citizen becomes a permanent resident, he can work in Russia without a special permit.
Finally, and perhaps the most important of all, permanent residency means that a foreigner never has to go through the hassle of getting a visa again. Once he becomes a permanent resident, he can enter and leave Russia with no visa.
Permanent residency can be issued for a foreign citizen that has resided in Russia under TRP no less than in one year; application shall be filed in FMS no later than six months until the TRP expiration.
The application and all the required documents are reviewed during six months.
Permanent residency is granted for a period of five years. This can be renewed indefinitely or converted to citizenship.
A foreign citizen that has permanent residency should confirm this status every year in FMS.
People who plan to live in Russia for the long-term and who will spend at least six months per year in Russia are recommended to apply for residency. Once a foreign citizen gets it he must live in Russia six months a year or will lose residency.
Obtaining of residency will free you from obligation to apply for a dozen of migration documents, this will save your time and money.

If you need additional information about procedure you can e-mail me

Nyusha
13-06-2009, 19:34
I've read through the thread. Lots of good info. Thanks everyone.

I am from the US (California). I am trying to figure out how many times I have to travel to the US and which documents to get while I am there. This is the advice I got from the people that do our work permits at my job...

Перечень документов, которые необходимо будет собрать :

1) заявление в 2-х экземплярах
2) 4 фотографии 35 х 45 мм
3) документ, удостоверяющий личность и гражданство (срок действия не менее 6 месяцев)
4) документ, выданный полномочным органом государства постоянного
проживания, подтверждающий наличие или отсутствие судимости у
заявителя (представляется нотариально заверенный перевод на русский язык).
5) один из документов, подтверждающий наличие у заявителя средств, обеспечивающих ему в Российской Федерации
прожиточный минимум (справка о доходах физического лица, декларация о доходах с отметкой
налогового органа, справка с места работы, трудовая книжка, справка о наличии вклада в кредитном учреждении с указанием номера счета,
свидетельство о праве на наследство, иной документ, подтверждающий получение доходов от не запрещенной законом деятельности
или нетрудоспособность)
6) сертификат об отсутствии у заявителя ВИЧ-инфекции
7) документ, подтверждающей, что заявитель не болен наркоманией и не страдает лепрой (болезнь Гансена), туберкулезом, сифилисом, шанкроидом,
хламидийной лимфогранулемой (перечень утвержден Постановлением Правительства Российской Федерации от 02.04.2003г. №188);
(В г.Москве управлением здравоохранения административного округа выдается медицинское заключение о состоянии здоровья иностранного гражданина).
8) Свидетельство о рождении, выданное на территории РСФСР или РФ органом ЗАГС.
9) Свидетельство о браке/разводе

Срок рассмотрения заявления составляет приблизительно 6 месяцев со дня его подачи со всеми документами.
Орган внутренних дел в месячный срок со дня принятия решения должен
направить заявителю уведомление с указанием номера и даты его принятия, а в случае принятия отрицательного решения - основания отказа.
Решение органа внутренних дел о выдаче иностранному гражданину разрешения на временное проживание является основанием для оформления
ему дипломатическим представительством или консульским учреждением Российской Федерации визы для въезда в Российскую Федерацию.
При оформлении разрешения на временное проживание иностранный
гражданин подлежит обязательной государственной дактилоскопической регистрации.
Разрешение на временное проживание выдается на 3 года, но каждый год
нужно отправлять в УФМС уведомление о подтверждении своего правового статуса,
с указанием адреса проживания, годового дохода, места работы и др.
За выдачу разрешения на временное проживание взимается государственная пошлина в установленном Законом порядке.
Иностранный гражданин, получивший разрешение на временное проживание не вправе по собственному желанию изменять место своего проживания
в пределах субъекта Российской Федерации, на территории которого ему разрешено временное проживание, или избирать место своего проживания вне
пределов указанного субъекта Российской Федерации.



This information was accurate as of April 7, 2009 at least. Now having read this thread, I am at a bit of a loss as to how exactly to get the fingerprints needed for the FBI check, which documents constitute proof of income (tax returns, bank statements, paycheck stubs...all three?) and what do I do if my landlord refuses to register me? Do I have to move? Do I have to ask a Russian friend to register me or even "propisat' menya"?

I hope this info helps someone, but if anyone knows the answers to my questions above, I'd really appreciate some help.

tgma
15-06-2009, 16:24
Hello Nyusha
I'm not a big expert, as I'm just about to start this process, but my understanding is that you need one of the proofs of income (I'm planning to get a statement from my bank confirming that there is enough money deposited there.). Alternatively, if you have a legit job here, you just need a form from your employer, called a 2НДФЛ if I remember rightly.

You do need a document from the apartment holder allowing you to live there, and if your landlord won't do this, you have to ask a friend. Also that friend will have to provide a document from his local housing agency showing that he is up to date with his housing payments.

On the fingerprints, I don't know, but I suggest searching this forum - the topic seems to come up a lot.

Ilyinka
11-09-2009, 22:57
I've been told not all the Western clinics are licensed to do the tests for medspravkas. It's expensive, and if you plan it correctly, it's not such a terrible process to do them. I've just run thru doing the MedSpravka for the 3rd time (2nd for me, and did it once for my kids...) - For the Moscow Central A.O., you can get to the 3 clinics in one day for the first test. The pain-in-the-neck part is delivering samples back to Ulista Radio the next day, but anyone - a courier, driver, spouse - can do that for you. It's much cheaper to do it the "official" way, and there seem to be very few people there now, so it's quick. Dragon ladies galore, but they're matched by an equal number of nice folks. It's quite an experience.

Criminal record: US Embassy Moscow/US citizen services site sends you to the International Migration Agency (or something like that) near 1905 Metro - very easy and efficient. You then send your prints to the FBI for a record check; they return the record check, and you have to send this on to the State of West Virginia for apostilling. FBI does not do this themselves. Best is to have a friend/family member in the US help - have the FBI record check sent to them, and ask them to do the second phase. I've done this 3 times (don't ask) - it's pretty quick, 4-5 weeks max. But the US Embassy website info is very clear and has all the links you need.




Great info! Finally, something coherent! Too bad they don't put the application form online...

As I understand, he couldn't/didn't tell you if medical exams could be done at a local Western clinic?

Also, any comment re: the fact that the FBI doesn't apostille documents? I actually saw on the web site of the Dept. of State that they will apostille a U.S. gov't. document, but that will require even more time...

Thanks for your patience waiting in line and diligence in posting all here.

Bels
12-09-2009, 15:51
In regards to clinics, there is a list at the FMS. Those clinics on the list are the ones you should use.


I've been told not all the Western clinics are licensed to do the tests for medspravkas. It's expensive, and if you plan it correctly, it's not such a terrible process to do them. I've just run thru doing the MedSpravka for the 3rd time (2nd for me, and did it once for my kids...) - For the Moscow Central A.O., you can get to the 3 clinics in one day for the first test. The pain-in-the-neck part is delivering samples back to Ulista Radio the next day, but anyone - a courier, driver, spouse - can do that for you. It's much cheaper to do it the "official" way, and there seem to be very few people there now, so it's quick. Dragon ladies galore, but they're matched by an equal number of nice folks. It's quite an experience.

Criminal record: US Embassy Moscow/US citizen services site sends you to the International Migration Agency (or something like that) near 1905 Metro - very easy and efficient. You then send your prints to the FBI for a record check; they return the record check, and you have to send this on to the State of West Virginia for apostilling. FBI does not do this themselves. Best is to have a friend/family member in the US help - have the FBI record check sent to them, and ask them to do the second phase. I've done this 3 times (don't ask) - it's pretty quick, 4-5 weeks max. But the US Embassy website info is very clear and has all the links you need.

SV1973a
13-09-2009, 09:47
In regards to clinics, there is a list at the FMS. Those clinics on the list are the ones you should use.

You have to go to your FMS where you want to make your application.
They will give you the list of state clinics assigned to their geographical area.
Do not try to give documents from any other clinics, leave alone European or American clinics in Moscow. They will simply refuse your certificat, and you will have to start all over again.
How do I know?
It happened to me!

Bels
13-09-2009, 18:08
i heard a guy got his temporary in three weeks.
Has anybody out here heard anything similar?

no

SV1973a
13-09-2009, 19:00
maybe many many years ago this was possible.
Definitely impossible since the last years.

vodnistadion
14-09-2009, 07:12
no

Friend (Italian) got his permanent in 4 weeks. Last February.

SV1973a
14-09-2009, 08:32
Permanent not Temporary.
I suppose PRP can be much quicker than TRP. After all they already have done a thorough check for the TRP...

Bels
14-09-2009, 12:08
And no more police checks, but all the medicals are all done again. Hence you have got to get moving if you want permanent done in four weeks.

lenvindman
24-09-2009, 17:06
Agree that this is a very useful conversation.

tgma
09-10-2009, 17:51
Has anyone found an online version of the application form for a temporary residency permit, please?

Bels
09-10-2009, 17:57
Has anyone found an online version of the application form for a temporary residency permit, please?

I think you are joking. You go to your FMS and get it, along with list of requirements.

Bels
09-10-2009, 18:10
Perhaps somebody who has the empty form might be able to scan and paste it here.
Problem is are they all uniform with all of FMS. And obviously lists of clinics will be different.

Notelina
09-10-2009, 18:12
Has anyone found an online version of the application form for a temporary residency permit, please?
I've found one but im not sure that it is what u need, coz i've never had a such experience
So - if u know how it looks - find the attachement in my message to check is it what were u looking for... or not

SV1973a
09-10-2009, 18:37
I have an electronic file, but have to delete my personal data. Then it can be put on this site.

RollingStone
19-10-2009, 14:48
All what you have investigated is just a hoax!

I got married and applied for a TRP and I got it 6 months after my marriage without having to go throughout all that paperwork you've described here.

If you have any contacts in the UFMS and OVIR (which has renamed since 2004), they can certainly facilitate the way for you to get the TRP once and for all.

Of course the OVIR officer had to tell you what should legally be done to get the TRP. They're never gonna tell you how it is ACTUALLY done.

All what you're doing to the readers is confusing them and getting to believe in the "ultimate burocratic revelation", many aspects of which are absolutely FALSE!

I hate such kind of 3rd hand knowledge and information. Dammit!

Bels
19-10-2009, 16:29
Admitedly a few recent newbie members have attempeted to cause confusiion. Beware of friend of mine or friend of a friend quotes, as they are normally false.

But don't insult the majority of very good members here who have experienced having TRP and have done an excellent job of giving some very good information and advice here, and all on there freetime and who expect nothing in return except possibly a thank you.
Most of us giving information here should be highly commended. Check on the stickies as they appear to be the best.

For example No you can't get residency in four weeks. And yes you can get all the documents, lists required at the FMS or is it UFMS now. Yes some of us do get out of date. But like me, I keep my eyes open by reading here and try to keep up to date. I don't there has been major changes over the past few years.

SV1973a
19-10-2009, 18:35
All what you have investigated is just a hoax!

I got married and applied for a TRP and I got it 6 months after my marriage without having to go throughout all that paperwork you've described here.

If you have any contacts in the UFMS and OVIR (which has renamed since 2004), they can certainly facilitate the way for you to get the TRP once and for all.

Of course the OVIR officer had to tell you what should legally be done to get the TRP. They're never gonna tell you how it is ACTUALLY done.

All what you're doing to the readers is confusing them and getting to believe in the "ultimate burocratic revelation", many aspects of which are absolutely FALSE!
Dammit!

Hi RollingStone,
I would love to know about the alternative way to getting the TRP, PRP and citizenship.
Apparently you know this route, so it would be great if you could inform the forum members how to do it, how much it costs, how quickly it can be done, etc.

vodnistadion
19-10-2009, 23:19
I got married and applied for a TRP and I got it 6 months after my marriage without having to go throughout all that paperwork you've described here.

Yes and you can also buy a passport on any market.

amrknInMoscow
27-11-2009, 22:14
Yes, sadly, I AM a 'newbie' to Expat. And I REALLY found this thread extremely useful towards going through the procedure of applying to become a temporary resident.

I'm just sad to say that the Russian immigration office makes this procedure even more complicated than the US...which is something that I would have thought impossible having survived the 'Green Card' procedure with my wife (a Russian National).

And having been told from a fellow TEFL instructor that I am simply trading one problem for another (no longer needing a VISA for then...having to get a landlord to file registration for me as well as acquiring a re-entry visa every time I wish to visit another country)...I'm now weighing my original desire to ACQUIRE residency in Russia. :-)

Remington
27-11-2009, 23:10
I have a question about registration for TRP. Is it required to show the registration and letter from my Russian relative at the initial or final stage of TRP process? I've heard others say it can be shown at final stage before getting TRP. I'm wondering about this since my Russian relative is currently building a property outside of Moscow and won't have all the papers ready in January or February. Will I be able to initiate the TRP process in January and get all the necessary documents submitted at a later date? I want to do this so I can get in the quota system rather than later.

SV1973a
27-11-2009, 23:19
I have a question about registration for TRP. Is it required to show the registration and letter from my Russian relative at the initial or final stage of TRP process? I've heard others say it can be shown at final stage before getting TRP. I'm wondering about this since my Russian relative is currently building a property outside of Moscow and won't have all the papers ready in January or February. Will I be able to initiate the TRP process in January and get all the necessary documents submitted at a later date? I want to do this so I can get in the quota system rather than later.

After the FMS has placed the TRP stamp in your passport (6 months after you handed in the application), you have one week to fix the registration.
So that means that for now you still have plenty of time.

Remington
27-11-2009, 23:24
So I just hand in the application at the beginning and hand in the rest of the documents at the end?

SV1973a
28-11-2009, 08:21
So I just hand in the application at the beginning and hand in the rest of the documents at the end?

Application together with other documents like health certificate, police check,...
You have to browse through this forum to find out exactly which other documents these are. I think I have mentioned it in some other thread, as did some other forum members.

Anyway, after processing all these docs (which takes about 6 months), the FMS will put the big stamp in your passport that says that you have the TRP.

From that moment on you will have 7 days to do your registration. Also here you need a lot of documents (the documents you talk about are part of this).

Bottom line, if you want to start with your application you need to have the right documents, but you do not yet need the documents for registration.

doncossack
15-12-2009, 14:52
Any Aussies out there who have been through this process??? Pm me please:confused:

Remington
15-12-2009, 15:28
I'm way behind you VladSkyWalker as I'll only be sending my fingerprints to the States next wk. Since the FBI doesn't accept credit cards for expedited service, I'll 1st have to send them to family and have them forward them on with a money order or certified check. However, I plan on calling the State Dept re: apostilling the FBI history.

I called FBI and they said they don't forward the FBI result or document to the State Department for apostille. They will mail it back to the requestor's address and I will have to get public notary to certify the document with my statement stating that I received it from FBI. Then forward the notarized document to the state's secretary of the state to do the apostille.

The problem is... public notary requires a person to be physically present with ID since the document has the bearer's name. So the problem is finding a public notary willing to notarize the document without my presence.

Other option is to have my family mail the document from FBI to me in Russia and I take it to US Embassy to have it notarized then send the document back to the States. This costs around $250 for FedEx and fees for FBI document! US Embassy should provide this service since it's Federal document and all US Embassies have FBI office. This is nuts!

Russia knows how complicated this process is and US knows how to make it more complicated for Americans to live abroad.

I also asked FBI if they do the notary service and their answer is astounding NO. State Police record is much more simpler and they do notary or certify the document.

I have to agree that apostilling the FBI document is the most difficult, expensive and lengthy part of the process. Everything else is like a breeze in the park.

phil
24-12-2009, 10:10
I'm married to a Russian and need to apply for my TRP due to the ongoing visa/immigration problem. I have a visa that lasts until 15th September 2010. From reading the posts on here I understand the TRP can take up to 6 months to get. If I submit my papers in March, and then go on holiday for a month in July, What would happen if the TRP is issued while I'm out the country? Can I just return on my existing visa, and then go and get my TRP? Is your current visa cancelled as soon as the TRP is issued or as soon as you get the stamp in your passport? Also, does anyone know how to pick up your TRP if you are not in the country? (i.e. It's not ready before my visa runs out).

tgma
24-12-2009, 11:49
Phil
You will be fine going on vacation while your application is being reviewed. I made mine a month ago, and am going on vacation today, using my work visa. If you are out of the country, then you basically need to enter the country on any visa you can get, once the TRP is approved, and pick it up. There may be some other way of doing it, but it will be miles easier if you can do it in person, unless you have someone in country, who can do the legwork for you to get the TRP issued outside Russia. This is possible, I believe, but I've only heard of people doing it if they apply from outside Russia.

Of course, as the time draws near, there is nothing to stop you going to the FMS, asking what the progress is, and sorting out the problem in place. I may be in the same situation, and have built up a reasonable relationship with the girl at the FMS during the process of applying, and I'm sure she will lay out the alternatives, if the situation arises. NB, this doesn't mean a bribe, she's too lowly for this, but generally there is a way. You may be able to apply to have your TRP issued in a Russian consulate, for instance.

Why don't you apply before March, in any case?

phil
24-12-2009, 12:50
Thanks for your reply. I plan to apply as soon as possible. The problem is I need to get my SUBJECT ACCESS FORM from the UK and then get it legalized. How long did it take you to get yours? Were you able to do it without going back to the UK?

onlyforbrian
25-12-2009, 09:36
Wow,,I'm presently going through a residency as I write. I am a Canadian, and have been married to a Russian for 12 years. She lived with me in Canada for 3 years but got homesick, so we decided to sell our house in Canada and we bought a new condo in Moscow 8 years ago. It seems the Canadian and American procedures differ slightly or I may be missing something. I am 63 years old, still working, but I am also collecting a Canada pension that I became eligible for at age 60. I will get a second old age pension at 65 but must retire to collect that one. So ...we decided I will retire and take up permanent residence in Moscow this spring. Therefore, I returned to Moscow this past July and stayed 3 months to apply for permanent residence. I don"t mean to scare or discourage anyone, but it is a hell of a process to go through. Canadians can get a criminal record check from their regional police, who are connected to CPIC the national police database, and then they must take it to the Canadian Foreign Affairs office in Ottawa to get "legalized" as the Russians love to say (stamped). Then , because our condo is in Treghorka, a suburb apartment complex on the western edge of Moscow, we had to submit and begin our process and application in Odintsovo, the small town beside our complex whose OVIR office was closest to our apartment. We needed a criminal record check, birth certificate, passport copies, all the medicals, proof of marriage, wife's passport, proof of apartment, everything needed to be translated after collection into Russian..all the medical procedures, urine, blood, xray etc., were not done in one clinic as in the west..we had to run all over hell. Now here is a sample of the kind of things you need to prepare yourself for in the Russian beurocracy...the OVIR office in Odintsovo only works Tuesday mornings and Thursday. Everyone in Western Moscow and surrounding area must apply through that office. That includes neighbouring foreigners..Uzbeks, Georgians, Ukrainians, Moldovians, Bela-russians and on and on...this is one small office with one girl handling everybody. If you plan to go , let's say,Thursday when they open at 9 am, you must begin to line up outside at about 4 pm Wednesday afternoon and put your name on a list on the outside door, then you must stand there all night and guard your name, because if you leave, the other people waiting will remove your name from the list. I learned from a couple wasted visits that this girl can only handle between 12 to 15 people a day, and by morning there are usually a couple hundred people waiting..a real nightmare! Anyway..I finally got everything processed and handed in, and then I did find out a couple things...because I am on pension and my wife and I own a condo free and clear..I am not required to show proof of income. I also learned that it takes 5 to 6 months to process and I must wait outside of Russia. I turned everything in to them at the end of September. Then found out to my horror, after returning to Canada to wait..that at the end of November the OVIR office kicked my criminal record check back to my wife because,.. what no-one told me, was that after I got my check stamped by Canadian foreign affairs I was then supposed to take it to the Russian Consulate in Toronto and have them also put a stamp on it. I'm also amazed that the girl in OVIR didn't point that out at the time I turned it in, as the Russians seem to check over documents with a magnifying glass. My wife and I in the interest of time being of the essence then fed-exed it back and forth overnight (a bit pricey but had to be done) and manged to return it to OVIR, but lost 3 weeks over the debacle..I was concerned about my other documents becoming outdated but my wife says she was told that since my documents were already turned in and going through the process, don't worry about it unless other problems pop up. Lets hope so. Finally, if my documents successfully p**** I'm told I will be issued a "Grand Passport" which is merely an unlimited visa placed in my passport with a 3 year life and expiry date. After that time, if I've been a good boy and haven't broken any Russian laws, I will be issued a 5 year visa, then...after that one...permanent residency

Bogatyr
25-12-2009, 12:41
Finally, if my documents successfully p**** I'm told I will be issued a "Grand Passport" which is merely an unlimited visa placed in my passport with a 3 year life and expiry date. After that time, if I've been a good boy and haven't broken any Russian laws, I will be issued a 5 year visa, then...after that one...permanent residency

Temporaray residency is for 3 years, but note that you must acquire a special exit visa in order to leave Russia (on *every* exit) or else your residency will be cancelled. There are other restrictions as well regarding work but if you're retired then they dont apply to you. "Permanent residency" (vid na zhitseltsvo) is the "5 year visa" and must be applied for, you don't just "get it", and is not "permanent" but must be renewed every 5 years (currently a fairly simple procedure). You don't need an exit visa once you get your "vid," you're almost a citizen with that (for 5 years).

There are many threads pertaining to TRP and PRP in these forums, reviewing them to understand the requirements and benefits is a good idea.

Bogatyr
25-12-2009, 13:40
Wow,,I'm presently going through a residency as I write.

I've never heard of a requirement to wait outside of Russia for the TRP -- they just don't give you any extensions to the visa you had when you originally applied. You must exit the country according to your visa. There's nothing stopping you from acquiring a new visa and re-entering Russia normally whlie you wait. Since the longest stay you can get without having either a student or a work visa is 90 days, you'd have to exit and re-enter a few times if you want to be in Russia while you wait.

The city and region in which one applies seems to make a huge difference to the TRP experience. I'm in Saint Petersburg, and here there are public polyclinics which offer a one-stop experience for all the required tests (the tests themselves just took a few minutes each, most of the time was in the paperwork). I did mine yesterday and was in an out in about an hour for all the tests. It's worth shopping around, some places wanted 3500R, the place I ended up going to was 2000R. And contrary to what others have written here (about Moscow TB clinics I think), the clinics are not "the scariest place on earth." In fact they are quite modern, clean, and bright, with polite, business-like people working in them. These are public clinics, not private. The FSB office provides a list of facilities that perform the required tests.

onlyforbrian
25-12-2009, 19:09
Thank you Bogatyr, I didn't word my statement properly...yes, they don't exactly say "you must wait outside the country" but what did happen is that I went there on a 90 day visa (the max allowed) and by the time I got my ass in gear, got everything done, collected , handed in etc., I had used up most of my 3 months. I heard on some forum that a person can ask for an extension to their visa to wait for the processing of their application. So I asked for an extension to my visa and they said "No, you must leave the country when your 90 days expire". It is my understanding that you are only allowed 90 days every 6 months, which means I must vacate Russia for at least 3 months and my wife then needs to do a new invitation for my next visa and then I need to submit it with everything else to the Russian consulate for my new entry visa, which I know from experience, all takes a couple months...OVIR has effectively made me wait outside the country, if you catch my meaning.:nut:

Bogatyr
25-12-2009, 22:35
It is my understanding that you are only allowed 90 days every 6 months, which means I must vacate Russia for at least 3 months and my wife then needs to do a new invitation for my next visa and then I need to submit it with everything else to the Russian consulate for my new entry visa, which I know from experience, all takes a couple months...OVIR has effectively made me wait outside the country, if you catch my meaning.:nut:

You're welcome! My understanding is that you can get back-to-back 90-day "delovaya" (business) visas, leaving the country every 3 months, at least for now. I've also read here in this forum that there is such a thing as a "TRP visa" which is a 4-month visa which allows you to enter Russia to pick up your already-issued TRP but that's obviously less useful (unless you can get one while still waiting...no info on that). The 90/180 rule is for multiple-entry business visas, not 90-day visas. I've read here that Russia is making noises about closing the 90-day back-to-back "loophole" but there hasn't been anything concrete about that yet. Best to make use of that while it's still possible!

Bels
25-12-2009, 23:00
You're welcome! My understanding is that you can get back-to-back 90-day "delovaya" (business) visas, leaving the country every 3 months, at least for now. I've also read here in this forum that there is such a thing as a "TRP visa" which is a 4-month visa which allows you to enter Russia to pick up your already-issued TRP but that's obviously less useful (unless you can get one while still waiting...no info on that). The 90/180 rule is for multiple-entry business visas, not 90-day visas. I've read here that Russia is making noises about closing the 90-day back-to-back "loophole" but there hasn't been anything concrete about that yet. Best to make use of that while it's still possible!

Interesting point. Is the 90 day there, and 90 day day back really a loophole?

And yes we really do need some help for those spouses who may ell have Russian families to support to avoid the inconvenience of having to leave and endure great expense leaving the country of Russia, when they should be here in Russia supporting their wife and possibly very young children.

Yes a special spouse visa for those applying for for TRP here would be most appreciated. It makes a lot of sense compared to the shere lunacy happening at the moment.Believe me. Russian women and Russian children are suffering at the moment due to their crazy red-tape. Dous Russian government honestly want this? They are voters by the way! And they do ass the word to other very sympathetic Russians you know that, don't you?

onlyforbrian
25-12-2009, 23:27
Thanks again..I already have my ticket back to Moscow on May 26th. I submitted my papers the last week of September so if everything was correct, then 5 to 6 month process time would mean my 3 year visa should be ready the 1st of March or April. Even with the delay due to my screw-up with my criminal record check that would push it back to the end of May. My wife will get me the usual 90 day private visa which would mean I'm in Moscow from 26th of May to 26th of August..that means I have an 8 month safe window which should be plenty of time to process my documents. I've learned that unlike Canadian or American beurocrats who never deliver anything as promised, the Russians at least are like their trains..when they say 5 to 6 months, they mean 5 to 6 months. They pride themselves in their punctuality. As in their offices, when they say they open at 9:30..they don't mean 9:29 or 9:31 they mean 9:30 ! I just hope I'm correct in my understanding and calculations, then everything should be fine. And yes to you also Bels, certainly my wife needs me for my financial support and security, but over the past 12 years she and her family have given me much in return, they have welcomed me into their family with love and kindness, and my wife has gone through all the same beurocratic nonsense and red tape, right there beside me every step of the way, filling out the papers, standing in the lines, sitting hours on end on the metro, and so on. Which I must admit showed much more kindness and loyalty than I ever recieved from any of my western relationships.

Bogatyr
26-12-2009, 11:44
Interesting point. Is the 90 day there, and 90 day day back really a loophole?

I would agree, no it's not a loophole. But does it really take 90 days to get a new visa? If it's a 90-day "delovaya" (business) visa, and you request expedited service (for $$$), then it can be just a few days or a week or two at most. Maybe personal invitation visas are slower. The business visa may be more convenient / faster to acquire.


Yes a special spouse visa for those applying for for TRP here would be most appreciated. It makes a lot of sense compared to the shere lunacy happening at the moment.Believe me. Russian women and Russian children are suffering at the moment due to their crazy red-tape. Dous Russian government honestly want this? They are voters by the way! And they do ass the word to other very sympathetic Russians you know that, don't you?

I absolutely agree a "applied and waiting for TRP" visa is required. Unfortunately it won't be ready in time for me...

phil
24-01-2010, 17:33
Hi everybody. Could somebody answer the following question for me?

Let's say I submit my documents for TRP in March. From what I understand it can take 3-6 months to get it. What happens if my TRP is ready in the middle of July, just before I go on holiday (for 1 month). Can I wait to pick up my TRP? Is there a time limit from when it's issued until you can pick it up? I'm planning on it taking 6 months (ready in September). Knowing my luck it'll take 4 months and be ready just before I go on holiday. Does anyone have any experience of this?

onlyforbrian
24-01-2010, 20:00
Hi Phil,
I submitted my TRP in Moscow in September, was told it's a 5 to 6 month wait, so returned to Canada towait (90 day visa expired), I then had a problem with one of my documents that needed a stamp in Canada (the Russian burocracy loves stamps) so it was returned to my wife the middle of November, we fedexed back and forth so they had the corrected document the end of November. I then , now thinking my document process now wouldn't begin until the end of Nov., worried my documents might be stale and outdated, or not, and still begin at the end of Sept., so I had my wife ask them how this affects my process, what happens in all the confusion if my documents are ready 3 or 4 months before I return to Russia? Their answer was "Don't worry about it" So I booked a flight to Russia for 26th May, on a 90 day visa, which takes me to the end of Aug. so hopefully all will be fine.

phil
24-01-2010, 22:50
Thanks for that. I'll post my experience on here when everything is completed. Be good if you did too. Sounds like you've had a bit of a nightmare.

onlyforbrian
24-01-2010, 23:38
Where are you Phil? U.S.? Britain?I'm guessing the procedure here is similar everywhere...you are right,.. it was (to some extent still is) a nightmare. Ispent over a month running around Moscow getting documents together, plus my Canadian documents. Also, any english documents need to be translated to Russian. It is also the old story ..the burocrats never tell you anything, you have to find out all on your own. My particular problem concerned a criminal record check. I had to get it from my local police and RCMP (FBI in U.S.) then I had to take it to Canadian Foreign affairs and get a validation stamp, THEN apparently I was supposed to take it to the Russian consulate in Toronto to get a stamp from THEM too!! My best advice is contact your foreign affairs office and your nearest Russian consulate and reguest step by step procedures on getting a TRP and follow EXACTLY!

onlyforbrian
05-02-2010, 12:17
Someone can correct me on this, but I asked the lady collecting my documents in OVIR if she wanted financial assets or proof of income documents, I am collecting a Canada pension. Her reply was "You are a pension person, people with pensions don't need to file assets or income documents".

tgma
05-02-2010, 16:51
I submitted my temporary residency application in November, and was told that no financial documents are required. This may be because I'm married to a Russian, and so I'm not in the quota. There is space on the form for information about income and education, but I was told that this isn't required because I'm married to a Russian.

ezik
05-02-2010, 22:17
Very much true.

Just remember: you will need to register again after receiving your TRP. Annual procedure. First time, I wasn't asked about any financial means. Second time, I was asked to provide financial data. So prepare!

Two options here:
- Get the monthly or annual income statement of your employer (if any) translated, legalized.
- Open a Russian bank account, throw some money in it and have the bank print out a statement.

I went for the 2nd option. Did it at Sberbank and it was easy. 100k rubles sufficiently impressed the local UFMS branch.


I submitted my temporary residency application in November, and was told that no financial documents are required. This may be because I'm married to a Russian, and so I'm not in the quota. There is space on the form for information about income and education, but I was told that this isn't required because I'm married to a Russian.

Bels
05-02-2010, 22:43
HEY! You might have answered a very good question to your fellow Canadians here!! And I have highlighted your very important statement and anwer for many other Canadians. Getting a police check and geting your documents appostiled. To take your police record to Canadian Foriegn Affairs and get it validatedIsn't that the same as having your documents appostilled of some Canadians say has been refused. Is there a confusion for them. I hope you can help your fellow Canadians. As yo are the only one I have seen here who has had a successful answer



Where are you Phil? U.S.? Britain?I'm guessing the procedure here is similar everywhere...you are right,.. it was (to some extent still is) a nightmare. Ispent over a month running around Moscow getting documents together, plus my Canadian documents. Also, any english documents need to be translated to Russian. It is also the old story ..the burocrats never tell you anything, you have to find out all on your own. My particular problem concerned a criminal record check. I had to get it from my local police and RCMP (FBI in U.S.) then I had to take it to Canadian Foreign affairs and get a validation stamp, THEN apparently I was supposed to take it to the Russian consulate in Toronto to get a stamp from THEM too!! My best advice is contact your foreign affairs office and your nearest Russian consulate and reguest step by step procedures on getting a TRP and follow EXACTLY!

Bels
05-02-2010, 22:46
The above post is brilliant for Canadians. We have been looking for those who are Canadian and have had experience in applying TRP for a long time. If you are Canadian? This appears to be the guy for advice. It looks correct.

tgma
08-02-2010, 11:28
I should have added to what I said that I did write a little note that confirms that I understand that I will have to present, at the end of a year, my INN (tax number) and confirmation of means of support (as far as I remember).


Very much true.

Just remember: you will need to register again after receiving your TRP. Annual procedure. First time, I wasn't asked about any financial means. Second time, I was asked to provide financial data. So prepare!

Two options here:
- Get the monthly or annual income statement of your employer (if any) translated, legalized.
- Open a Russian bank account, throw some money in it and have the bank print out a statement.

I went for the 2nd option. Did it at Sberbank and it was easy. 100k rubles sufficiently impressed the local UFMS branch.

ElizabethH
16-03-2010, 17:10
I'm due to turn in my TRP application next month and wanted to take a trip to Estonia this weekend.

Will leaving the country for a few days do anything to affect my status as far as being on The List? I will have to re-register, but everything in my visa remains the same, it's just that I will have an additional stamp in my passport.

SV1973a
19-03-2010, 10:41
I'm due to turn in my TRP application next month and wanted to take a trip to Estonia this weekend.

Will leaving the country for a few days do anything to affect my status as far as being on The List? I will have to re-register, but everything in my visa remains the same, it's just that I will have an additional stamp in my passport.

Before you make the application and during the time that the application is processed (up to 6 months) you can travel freely in and out with a valid visa.
This does not affect your status by any means.
Travel restrictions (getting a single exit-entry visa before each trip) only begin once the TRP stamp is in your passport.

cristipas
20-03-2010, 01:57
hello guys,

is the info posted - i see that is old since 2007 - still matching the reality?

thanks,
c.

roro
20-03-2010, 15:32
hello guys,

is the info posted - i see that is old since 2007 - still matching the reality?

thanks,
c.

hey, mostly still match :)

But anyways always know that xp of other people it's just xp. Everything depends from a lot of things and your own situation. At the end the best way to go to fms where you are planing to apply and ask everything in very very small details, escpecially about appostils.

Beste

cristipas
22-03-2010, 01:03
hi roro,
thanks :) (and also thanks to the contributors)

regards,
c.

ElizabethH
27-04-2010, 09:44
Hi all,

I just handed in my application, so I'm at the beginning of the 6-month wait.

-Regarding medicals, I got them done here in St. P. for 2500 rubles, at a place near Pioneerskaya.

-Regarding FBI background check, I got it done with the FBI's new policy (Jan. 2010) to put a stamp on it, then you take it to the State Department for apostilling.

-Regarding finances, I was told that no statement is needed now, but they will check after the first year to make sure I'm making a living for myself here in Russia.

Question regarding registration: I understand from other people's posts that during the 6-month wait you can leave the country and come back on a new visa if necessary.

However, what happens if I need to register in a new place before getting my TRP? Can I let the UFMS know so that they will send my TRP to the new address? Or just collect it at the old address? Does anyone really care where I'm registered since I'll be changing it anyway after getting the TRP?

tgma
28-04-2010, 08:36
I think it doesn't matter where you are, while they are processing the TRP.
That is, you can be inside Russia (on a legit visa, of course, and properly registered), or outside Russia. But you don't have to stay in the same place.
My understanding is, once TRP is granted, you will have to show a place of residence, with the owner's approval, and they will register you there.

ElizabethH
28-04-2010, 12:47
Thanks!

mandelstam13
28-04-2010, 13:38
They don't send you the permit. You have to pick it up - and they don't tell you when it's ready. At least that's the case in Moscow.

mistermagic
28-04-2010, 20:08
Hello everybody,
i have a some questions guys. I want to apply for a Temporary residence but don't want to get married. i know that i will be in the quota if i do like that.
But
1. How and where to know if i will be in the quota or not?
2. How long it's take to know if i will be in the quota or not?
3. After the answer of the question 1. and 2., should i start prepare document for the TRP?

tgma
29-04-2010, 10:32
Hello Mistermagic
As far as I understand it, the availability of quota depends on the region where you live.
My sense is that it's very tricky in Moscow City and Moscow region, but I could be wrong.
I advise you to bite the bullet and go visit the relevant FMS office in the region where you live.
I applied on a non-quota basis, but I think that the application form is the same, only they need more information if you're doing it on a quota basis. This will be your education (certificates needed) and your employment history, and some proof of income. These, off the top of my head, are the bits that I didn't need to fill out when I applied.
My advice to you is to go talk to the FMS - I think that quotas are allocated on a monthly or quarterly basis, and they may well tell you that this period's quota is full and will tell you when it re-opens.

jps762
05-05-2010, 13:18
There's something I don't understand. You say that you can move while you are in the process of applying for the TRP, but in that process, aren't they going to ask you for a permanent address? I plan to move after September but my wife and I won't be looking for a new place until about August. Assuming we find a place by then, should we just put down that place on the application? Also, what is it that actually makes this take 6 months. Does it depend on the FBI check, the time needed to do the medical tests, or what? Also, how long is that FBI background check good for?

tgma
06-05-2010, 09:59
The FMS look for your address twice - once when you apply for TRP, they want to see your registration, basically just to make sure it's in order, I think. The woman at the FMS basically just looked at my registration slip, and checked that it matched something on her computer. That was it.

Then, once you get your TRP, you will need to register somewhere. I think that the only restriction here is that it should be in the same region where you got your TRP. So I got my TRP at the FMS in central Moscow, so I am going to need to register somewhere in the central region (ЦАО) of Moscow. I don't think that it will have to be the same place that I was registered when I submitted my documents.

Why does it take six months? No idea - any civilised country would take much less time, especially for those who have an entitlement to residence by marriage or birth. There are a bunch of agencies with a vested interest in the migration process, and each no doubt jealously guards its right to be involved, which no doubt is part of the general bureaucratic horse trading that is endemic in Russia. Every government department has mission creep, aiming to increase its oversight of as many areas of life as possible, because that is how they maximise their ability to extract rents from the population and the economy.

Bear in mind that the six months starts the day that you submit your documents. All of the medical tests, background check etc should be valid on that date. That's all that matters. Once you have submitted your documents, you could go off and commit a crime in your home country, or contract leprosy or tuberculosis or whatever, and you would be fine as far as the Russian authorities are concerned.

SV1973a
06-05-2010, 10:18
It is a big riddle for me, why one needs to fill in all these lengthy `application forms`. I mean, for literally everything that you ever need in this country, you need to make an application and on the application form you need to write down tons of data... that they already possess, because all info is stored on a computer system.
In my home country everybody has an electronic ID-card, that contains all this information. For all contacts with the authorities it is sufficient if you present this electronic ID-card, and no need to fill in anything anymore...
My Russian friend explained to me that Russians need to fill in all this stuff, so that the authorities can check whether you correctly fill in the forms....

jps762
06-05-2010, 23:03
The FMS look for your address twice - once when you apply for TRP, they want to see your registration, basically just to make sure it's in order, I think. The woman at the FMS basically just looked at my registration slip, and checked that it matched something on her computer. That was it.

Then, once you get your TRP, you will need to register somewhere. I think that the only restriction here is that it should be in the same region where you got your TRP. So I got my TRP at the FMS in central Moscow, so I am going to need to register somewhere in the central region (ЦАО) of Moscow. I don't think that it will have to be the same place that I was registered when I submitted my documents.

Why does it take six months? No idea - any civilised country would take much less time, especially for those who have an entitlement to residence by marriage or birth. There are a bunch of agencies with a vested interest in the migration process, and each no doubt jealously guards its right to be involved, which no doubt is part of the general bureaucratic horse trading that is endemic in Russia. Every government department has mission creep, aiming to increase its oversight of as many areas of life as possible, because that is how they maximise their ability to extract rents from the population and the economy.

Bear in mind that the six months starts the day that you submit your documents. All of the medical tests, background check etc should be valid on that date. That's all that matters. Once you have submitted your documents, you could go off and commit a crime in your home country, or contract leprosy or tuberculosis or whatever, and you would be fine as far as the Russian authorities are concerned.

Do you register at the same place where you apply for the TRP?

tgma
07-05-2010, 16:27
In central Moscow, you do your TRP at the office in Polyanka, and then you register in the FMS of the region where you live.
They may be in the same building in other regions

jps762
07-05-2010, 23:05
In central Moscow, you do your TRP at the office in Polyanka, and then you register in the FMS of the region where you live.
They may be in the same building in other regions

When you say "region" you mean raion right.

tgma
11-05-2010, 09:19
JPS762 - in Moscow, you're right, region means "raion"
But I guess outside the capital and outside big cities, the FMS department which does residency permits and the department which registers you may well be in the same building. For instance, my wife is registered in Yuzhnoye Butovo, and I'm pretty sure they are all in the one building there.

davilan
25-05-2010, 14:05
A few notes on the many things I've read here.

1) The Russian migration department does have a website-in Russian only of course-where you CAN download all forms and it does list all documents currently needed for ALL the different migration processes including residency. The URL is:

fmschel(dot)ru

but you will need a person that reads Russian.

2) The process for persons married to a Russian citizen is different than from others just applying for residency. Do not interchange the advice for the 2 processes some parts are different. The migration department is obliged to offer residency to those married to citizens. They are not supposed to turn you down unless you have legal problems or create a security risk. Others can be turned down without explanation-there is no legal obligation to offer residency. The 2 types of candidates are not treated equally.

3) There are 2 separate migration agencies-the OVIR is the local militza and has jurisdiction over local migration issues such as registration of foreigners. Residency is only a federal migration issue and the federal militza's migration department handles that. In some places the federal migration department asks the local department (ovir) to go over your papers and help you in completing your paperwork package before you show up at the federal migration office but you are always allowed to apply directly to the federal office. If you have been smart enough to have developed a good relationship with the migration officer at your ovir-start with them as they will help you. Otherwise go right to the federal department. Do yourself a favor-make a friend at the federal migration department. It will make a difference. Better is if you find a friend there before you go-if you're in Russia long enough to apply for residency and don't know a friend who's friend has a friend in the militza that can help you-go home as your survival potential in Russia is limited.

davilan
27-05-2010, 15:41
to continue the above:

4) The process of licensing medical facilities is absurd and political. Different medical facilities will have various licenses but only medical facilities licensed by the migration department to issue medical certificates, can issue certificates that are acceptable for any of the migration requirements. So be aware-NO you can not go just anyplace-you MUST obtain medical certificates from the migration department's approved list.

5) an apostle is a stamp placed on a document by a state department (or the equivalent) certifying that the document is legal for international use. Certain migration documents such as a police report require apostles. In the U S the Department of State for each state will issue an apostle. For other countries check with your own embassy-they will tell you where and how to obtain an apostle.

Bogatyr
29-05-2010, 14:37
Why does it take six months? No idea - any civilised country would take much less time, especially for those who have an entitlement to residence by marriage or birth.

You think so? My understanding is that the waits for residency in countries like the US and Australia can run many years, if you can get in at all, even with full rights according to the law. The paperwork is formidable for Russian TRP but my experience is that if you fit the requirements (especially marriage to a citizen) then getting private invitations and TRP goes relatively smoothly. TRP is the gateway to PRP and even citizenship, so a guaranteed 6 month maximum wait (according to the law) is actually pretty reasonable! Probably the worst part of TRP and UFMS interactions in general is the subjective variability of the requirements imposed by the individual officers / locations.

About the Russian 6 months -- multiple departments must give the "OK" on the applicant, and getting these responses can take time. 6 months is the maximum wait, not the minimum. Some people report getting TRP in 4 months after submission. My region says 5 months is the typical minimum, but waits can range from 4-6 months.

Belenya
04-06-2010, 21:16
Is it best to go straight to Polyanka to start the TRP proccess or to your nearest FMS?

SV1973a
04-06-2010, 21:26
Is it best to go straight to Polyanka to start the TRP proccess or to your nearest FMS?

Nearest FMS

Bels
04-06-2010, 22:15
Agreed. You go to the FMS for your area. Some are good apparetly, and some are bad. But you don't have a choice. Some of them either don't know the regulations, or simply ask for what is not necessary on top of their heads, just to be awkward. I don't kow, maybe they just guess what the true regulations might be, or perhaps they are happy in making their own individual rules. Apparently they have the right to do so. Even office staff.


Nearest FMS

alexstone
07-07-2010, 15:44
You think so? My understanding is that the waits for residency in countries like the US and Australia can run many years, if you can get in at all, even with full rights according to the law. The paperwork is formidable for Russian TRP but my experience is that if you fit the requirements (especially marriage to a citizen) then getting private invitations and TRP goes relatively smoothly. TRP is the gateway to PRP and even citizenship, so a guaranteed 6 month maximum wait (according to the law) is actually pretty reasonable! Probably the worst part of TRP and UFMS interactions in general is the subjective variability of the requirements imposed by the individual officers / locations.

About the Russian 6 months -- multiple departments must give the "OK" on the applicant, and getting these responses can take time. 6 months is the maximum wait, not the minimum. Some people report getting TRP in 4 months after submission. My region says 5 months is the typical minimum, but waits can range from 4-6 months.

My TRP took just over 3 months (i'm married to a wonderful Russian princess), and was fairly painless to go through.

Other countries ARE worse in many respects, and as an example, the UK will cheerfully send you all over the countryside for documents, as no two offices seem to be in the same place, (and even if they are, i.e. London, the transport challenges required to get from one to the other are usually formidable). The price of de-centralization, and maintenance of the realm of the clipboard emperors.......

Australia (and i lived there for quite some time) is tough too, and a lot harder than Russia to get into and stay. With the recent tightening of quotas, and the increase in verifiable proof required for many aspects of residency is more akin to a fortress, than a place to stay for a while.

Chile was tough as well, although i travelled as part of a cultural exchange, and there's the additional challenge of getting held up at gunpoint at the airport, for all your cash and documents BEFORE you get to customs. (5 of us in a group stuck together, and had a customs officer escort us from the plane to the terminal)

I've travelled to several countries in my lifetime, and i guess it's easier to make a comparison, and mix humour, patience, and pragmatism from that perspective, than someone who is making that first journey to a new land.

Russia may seem tough to some, but being objective, it's actually a bit easier in many respects. There are still challenges, but if you dot the i's, and cross the t's, then the process is more long, than neccessarily complicated or fraught with obstacles.

I have to add here, that i consider i've been really lucky when reading the accounts from others, as i've never had any real problems.

I would wish the same smooth rite of passage for all.

Russia's a great, interesting, entertaining, and rewarding place to live, imho.

Alex.

toughnut
07-11-2010, 10:40
x

trancophile
07-11-2010, 11:47
You're welcome! My understanding is that you can get back-to-back 90-day "delovaya" (business) visas, leaving the country every 3 months, at least for now. I've also read here in this forum that there is such a thing as a "TRP visa" which is a 4-month visa which allows you to enter Russia to pick up your already-issued TRP but that's obviously less useful (unless you can get one while still waiting...no info on that). The 90/180 rule is for multiple-entry business visas, not 90-day visas. I've read here that Russia is making noises about closing the 90-day back-to-back "loophole" but there hasn't been anything concrete about that yet. Best to make use of that while it's still possible!

Can anyone elaborate on this "TRP visa"? My current visa expires December 14th and it'll be six months since I applied for TRP on January 1st, of all dates!

Benedikt
07-11-2010, 11:54
sorry i am not at the base so i have no access to the link. but it is there
ALSO PUT YOUR FILLED OUT APPLICATION ON A CD OR MEMORY STICK. mine was rejected for ONE mistake (name). i had it with me on a stick, so the good inspector at the fmc in Shchukinskaya printed out a new one...
for my temporary permit i did NOT need any proof of how much money i earn, how much money i have in the bank. looks like indeed every office does their own.

but they wanted to know, name and address, where i worked the last 5 years. And in between, when not working, where i lived ( my home address here in moscow). was not asked to provide details when working short term out of the country...

for the med spravka i was not allowed to use a commercial clinic ( where i do my med book for working ) but had to use the clinics in Shchukino,Marshall Shukova and Octoberskaya Pole. Then schlepping with all three spravkas to Tushino, were they were exchanged for ONE blue form. The aids certificate stayed with it extra. if it is only ONE day expired, you have to start all over again.
And remember, don't forget to pay the 1000 rubles official fee. forms are also online, or at the local SBERKASSA.

MAKE COPIES OF EACH DOCUMENT, BUT HAVE EACH ORIGINAL ALSO WITH YOU. That includes your wife's passport!
I did it all myself, without paying a bribe, or help of an office. they quoted me 1000 $ and they do it for me. i thought for that money i do it myself.I was 'in line' four times. the first time in all fairness, just to get me all the forms and info. which is not needed if, in retro respect, would i have checked the online site of the FMC first very carefully, and special how to fill in the forms correctly, i could have done it at least one time less.
now it is 6 month waiting time to get the paper, the inspector will call me when my name is up, with the help of a good box of tea and coffee i made sure of this.

and last, maybe a not unimportant detail. when i was the first time at the FVC, they told me, i was not in the base yet. i only got back 3 weeks *(!!!!!) earlier from Vienna. So i went to the local Ovir to suggest they have a look, and indeed i was not yet there. But on the sofa there was a huge pile of post office envelopes, they had not 'gotten around' to enter my name. Checking the date on the envelopes, when the last one arrived. it takes the local post-office 10 days!!!!! to deliver registered mail from the post office to 4 streets further to the local OVIR...

NLD
07-11-2010, 22:33
and last, maybe a not unimportant detail. when i was the first time at the FVC, they told me, i was not in the base yet. i only got back 3 weeks *(!!!!!) earlier from Vienna. So i went to the local Ovir to suggest they have a look, and indeed i was not yet there. But on the sofa there was a huge pile of post office envelopes, they had not 'gotten around' to enter my name. Checking the date on the envelopes, when the last one arrived. it takes the local post-office 10 days!!!!! to deliver registered mail from the post office to 4 streets further to the local OVIR...

Exact same story here, that's why I always got registered at UFMS directly. (They also had a bunch of registration papers still lying there, but were kind enough to enter mine immediately when requested.)

FatAndy
08-11-2010, 09:00
NLD, it's recommended to do this way everywhere, not only in UFMS offices but in other bureaucracy offices too. Yes, it takes time, but finally you get needed result quicker.

TIMI
08-11-2010, 17:55
thank u so much for those informations , finally , usefull posts ,

das0405
09-12-2010, 04:47
Where are you Phil? U.S.? Britain?I'm guessing the procedure here is similar everywhere...you are right,.. it was (to some extent still is) a nightmare. Ispent over a month running around Moscow getting documents together, plus my Canadian documents. Also, any english documents need to be translated to Russian. It is also the old story ..the burocrats never tell you anything, you have to find out all on your own. My particular problem concerned a criminal record check. I had to get it from my local police and RCMP (FBI in U.S.) then I had to take it to Canadian Foreign affairs and get a validation stamp, THEN apparently I was supposed to take it to the Russian consulate in Toronto to get a stamp from THEM too!! My best advice is contact your foreign affairs office and your nearest Russian consulate and reguest step by step procedures on getting a TRP and follow EXACTLY!

I am also a Canadian with very similar situation as yours - 60+ years, retired, married to a Russian lady who has a legal residence in Moscow. Last September we completed the application for Temp Res with all required documents (we were lucky and did not make your mistake with the police check document). So I am now in Canada - "waiting". Three months has transpired. So it should be another 1 to 3 months before we get word. My question is - Once we get word that the applic has been accepted (if it is) - how long will I have to get to the office in Moscow to get the stamp in my passport and move on to the registration process? I will need to get a new private visa (now quite easy and quick) through the Russian Embassy in Ottawa and I will need also to make travel arrangements plus I am considering having a minor surgical procedure done before I go.

Also I am curious as to how your process finally ended?

onlyforbrian
09-12-2010, 05:33
Well...I'm not sure how to answer you except to say it may take longer than you expect. I did my TRP in Odintsovo (just outside MKAD and M1 highway because it is closest to my condo in Treghorka) I did everything and finally got it all submitted last September, at that time (as you were apparently told also)they told me it would take 5 to 6 months to be ready. Then problems popped up (They always do with the Russian burocrats) they waited until the end of december to tell me my birth certificate wasn't satifactory because I gave them the wallet size one we all carry. It seems they wanted the long form one, so I had to pay extra for a rush copy from the Canadian government, then paid extra to fedex it "next day" (actually 3 days) delivery Canada to Moscow. THEN...I booked my trip for May/June to pick it up. After arriving, I discovered it wasn't ready yet and they had no idea what the hold up was, or how long it would be, so I returned to Canada the end of June. THEN..my wife told me 3 weeks later in July that NOW it's ready! SOooo..the other fly in the ointment, I have prostate cancer and now need surgery, it is booked for Feb 2, 2011, and I need 8 weeks to recover. My wife,( AND I HOPE THE HELL SHE'S RIGHT)..said she contacted OVIR about the situation and they apparently told her not to worry that I had a year to pick it up (to the end of June 2011 since it was ready july 2010) so I booked a return flight for 16 of June 2011...like I said..I sure hope she got her facts straight...I'll let you know if I got it okay the end of June next year.:nut:

das0405
09-12-2010, 18:22
Well...I'm not sure how to answer you except to say it may take longer than you expect. I did my TRP in Odintsovo (just outside MKAD and M1 highway because it is closest to my condo in Treghorka) I did everything and finally got it all submitted last September, at that time (as you were apparently told also)they told me it would take 5 to 6 months to be ready. Then problems popped up (They always do with the Russian burocrats) they waited until the end of december to tell me my birth certificate wasn't satifactory because I gave them the wallet size one we all carry. It seems they wanted the long form one, so I had to pay extra for a rush copy from the Canadian government, then paid extra to fedex it "next day" (actually 3 days) delivery Canada to Moscow. THEN...I booked my trip for May/June to pick it up. After arriving, I discovered it wasn't ready yet and they had no idea what the hold up was, or how long it would be, so I returned to Canada the end of June. THEN..my wife told me 3 weeks later in July that NOW it's ready! SOooo..the other fly in the ointment, I have prostate cancer and now need surgery, it is booked for Feb 2, 2011, and I need 8 weeks to recover. My wife,( AND I HOPE THE HELL SHE'S RIGHT)..said she contacted OVIR about the situation and they apparently told her not to worry that I had a year to pick it up (to the end of June 2011 since it was ready july 2010) so I booked a return flight for 16 of June 2011...like I said..I sure hope she got her facts straight...I'll let you know if I got it okay the end of June next year.:nut:

Thanks for your speedy response. Your info about the delay and their response is very helpful. Lets stay in touch as it looks like we will likely go through the next stage at about the same time. We are expecting to hear that mine is ready sometime in Jan / Feb 2011. And I will likely be able to travel to Moscow by end of March 2011 latest. Interesting that you had to provide a copy of your birth certificate - we did not - just my passport. Perhaps it was because we were dealing with a different office. My wife's apt (where I will be registered) is near the Cokol Metro Station so we are dealing with the Moscow North office of the FMS. Or maybe it was because you initially applied almost a year earlier and they simply "changed the rules". in the interim

onlyforbrian
09-12-2010, 18:37
You could be right, because I know they seem to change the rules all the time. Anyway, my name is Brian (obviously lol) and my email is onlyforbrian2@gmail.com if you want to keep contact, once I'm a permanent resident, I'll be sure to invite you and your wife over for dinner. Besides, I'm on expats to meet other english people living in Moscow so I won't feel so much like a "stranger in a strange land" so the song goes. I posted already before looking for any english hangout type pubs in Moscow but never heard back from anyone. One thing I must say about this website, I find it a bit difficult to navigate around. Take care and good luck with the TRP.. :beerbros:

kukushka
05-01-2011, 01:26
I'm going to apply for a TRP soon.

I'm a bit confused about what is meant by "registration" document - is it the "vremennaya registratsiya", that every foreigner needs to get done when they arrive in Russia? Like the one I got for my multiple entry 1 year visa - It basically shows that I live at a certain address (and was done by a firm - I dont actually live there).

Or is it a more elaborate one, propiska as the locals call it, that is needed even by Russian citizens?

SV1973a
05-01-2011, 10:25
is it the "vremennaya registratsiya", that every foreigner needs to get done when they arrive in Russia? Like the one I got for my multiple entry 1 year visa - It basically shows that I live at a certain address (and was done by a firm - I dont actually live there).
YES


Or is it a more elaborate one, propiska as the locals call it, that is needed even by Russian citizens?
NO

Mallory
12-01-2011, 02:27
I am a US Citizen married to a Russian citizen. We currently are in the US. does anyone know if I can apply for the Russian temporary residence permit from America or even by mail? How much does the application itself cost? How long does it take to get approved? We are trying to find the best option that wouldn't force us to be separated for many months while the application is being processed. Thank you so much!

tgma
12-01-2011, 11:02
Hello Mallory
You would need to check with the consulate in the US - unfortunately, each consulate across the world tends to apply the rules differently.

The bottom line is that in theory you can get the TRP at an embassy, but in practice no one has done this (or at least, I don't recall anyone on the forums saying that they had done it). And in any case, you would need to then come to Russia to get the registration that you need to get a multi-entry visa.

The law says that it's possible, but in practice it seems that the consulates are not set up to do this.

Bogatyr
15-01-2011, 01:56
I am a US Citizen married to a Russian citizen. We currently are in the US. does anyone know if I can apply for the Russian temporary residence permit from America or even by mail? How much does the application itself cost? How long does it take to get approved? We are trying to find the best option that wouldn't force us to be separated for many months while the application is being processed. Thank you so much!

You have a number of options of submitting the application, nothing requires that you be separated for any amount of time, though. You really need to submit while in Russia, though. Best option is to prepare your documentation, get your FBI criminal background check going (read past threads here for details, especially the Apostille for US citizens thread), apply for a private visa, time everything as best you can so that you arrive in Russia with the FBI CBC very "fresh" (older than 3 months and it may be rejected), prepare your application, do the medical tests, etc.

Then you either return to the US and wait, or you stay in Russia on 3 month private stay visas, leaving for 1-2 days every 3 months to get a new 3 month visa until your TRP is approved. No reason to be separated at all. Russian law says the maximum allowed wait for TRP response is 6 months from the day the application is accepted.

Application expense is a few thousand rubles, the most expensive part is the medical tests and the notarizations/translations.

kukushka
11-02-2011, 01:24
and last, maybe a not unimportant detail. when i was the first time at the FVC, they told me, i was not in the base yet. i only got back 3 weeks *(!!!!!) earlier from Vienna. So i went to the local Ovir to suggest they have a look, and indeed i was not yet there. But on the sofa there was a huge pile of post office envelopes, they had not 'gotten around' to enter my name. Checking the date on the envelopes, when the last one arrived. it takes the local post-office 10 days!!!!! to deliver registered mail from the post office to 4 streets further to the local OVIR...

I have the same problem - not in the base. What should I do? Show up at local OVIR and request them to put me in to the system?

Also, my registration was done for 6 month period from mid Sept to mid March. Technically the registration is invalid now as I left Russia in between for few months and should have gotten a new one when I re-entered end of Dec.

So, I'm in a bit of spot as I'm already past the 3 day period to do new reg and old registration which on paper is valid till Mar 11 but is not in the computer system.

onlyforbrian
11-02-2011, 02:15
I don't know what to tell you...I'm dealing with OVIR in Odintsovo, just west of MKAD on Minsk Wacce, and I'm beginning to think each office works under it's own rules, because I have a friend going through the same thing, but dealing with a Moscow city center OVIR, and he said they told him that you have just 6 months from the time you submit your papers, and no more than 3 extra weeks depending on circumstances..so I may be in a real mess myself, although the woman I'm dealing with in Odintsovo OVIR seemed really friendly and liked me, I hope that helps me. Although that 6 month time limit doesn't make sense as it took them 9 months just to process my papers. I applied over a year and a half ago (Sept. 09) for crying out loud, then I returned from Canada in May 2010 to Moscow to pick it up, and it STILL wasn't ready so I waited to the end of June, when I was again told they had absolutely no idea when it would be ready or what the hold up was, so I returned to my job in Canada to wait again. Finally my wife contacted me to say it was ready the end of July , and I understood that you have 6 months to pick it up from the time it's ready. At least that's how I understood what Odintsovo OVIR told me. So I booked a return flight for Dec. 16th. But then I found out that my cancer turned aggresive, and that I need a life saving operation in the next few weeks ( waiting for an opening in the OR.) My wife talked to OVIR and explained my circumstances, and my wife says they told her that they will give me until the end June 2011 to pick it up as long as I have a letter from my cancer doctor with details and verifying my medical situation. I'm not stupid, I'll be sure to get it stamped at Candaian Foreign Affairs and legalized at the Russian Consulate in Toronto. It seems like they are willing to wait a long time for me, so I asked my wife, "Are you sure you understood them correctly?" and she swears up and down she did. I sure hope she's right because I don't feel like going through all this BS again.

EagleyeRC
27-04-2011, 00:34
Greetings. Married to Russian citizen, currently living in US, plan to retire in Russia. I am working to get a jump on TRP requirements and have not found the answer to a couple of questions thus far. Hoping that someone will see my plea for assistance and willing to share the info. If I get the FBI background check/finger prints (certificate good for 90 days) prior to departing US, can I apply for TRP before the 90 day expiration of the background check to avoid acquiring FBI background check from Russia? Simplified version of my question is how long after arriving in Russia can I submit for a TRP? If the answer is immediately upon arrival in Russia of course upon compiling all required documentation to include the medical, can the very determined get it into the system within 90 days?

A discussion topic I have not been able to find is someone who retires in the US with a pension, TRP to PRP in Russia with pension the only source of income. Not planning to work after retirement, current logic to provide previous year income tax statement and/or retire pay monthly statements?

Hope to make a renewed contribution here for the benefit of others.

Thanks in advance.

onlyforbrian
27-04-2011, 00:53
I don't know how the U.S./Russia relationship works, I'm in Canada, but I assume it's similar. I don't know where you got the 90 days from, my police check was good for 6 months. You can't really apply for a TRP ahead of time, you must be in Russia (from Canadian prespective) because you must apply at OVIR in person, and you need about a month because they require you to submit a medical etc, which is done in Russia and submit ALL your documents translated to Russian. There are lots of offices there that will translate them for you for a reasonable fee. Russia does not do a police check on you, they accept the one you bring from the states, because...and HERE IS THE IMPORTANT PART !! You must go to your local American foreign affairs office and get your police check stamped, and then take it to your closest Russian consulate and get them to stamp it (Russian burocrats love stamps) if you do not have these two rubber stamps when you try to present it with your documents in Russia, they WILL NOT ACCEPT IT! Ask me how I know...been there, done that...hope this helps.

onlyforbrian
27-04-2011, 01:09
Oh...I forgot to answer your one question, yes...you can apply anytime ..as soon as you get there, but be forewarned..find out where your office is,(Usually the closest to your anticipated residence) and find out what times and when they are open, mine was only Tuesdays and Thursdays. And IMPORTANT...GET THERE EARLY. By early, I mean EARLY..at my office you had to line up around supper time and wait all night to be near the front of the line for 9 a.m. (get used to lines in Russia) because the next morning there are several hundred people lined up (who are uninformed like you) and at my office there was only one girl doing applicants, and she required about 20-45 minutes for each applicant, so she only saw about 20 people each day, the rest stood there all day for nothing and had to come back on another day. The other bad news is if they find a problem with any of your paperwork they will tell you what you need to do to correct it and then SEND YOU AWAY!! And...they ALWAYS find something wrong, so get used to it. I had to go back 4 times. Like I said..you can apply right away, but you'll need about a month of running around from clinic to clinic (blood work in one clinic, xrays in another etc.) office to office etc. (translation) before you get through all the BS. Good luck.

DavidB
27-04-2011, 01:11
Onlyforbrian - the process is slightly different in Canada, because Canada never signed up to the convention with established Apostilles.
In most countries, instead of going to the foreign affairs department and then to the Russian Consulate, everything is done in a single step at the foreign affairs department, and the seal that is attached during that step is called an Apostille.

I have no idea why Canada hasn't signed that convention (it was in the 1960s, so they've had plenty of time). Just about every other country has signed it.

onlyforbrian
27-04-2011, 01:21
David, that's because Canada has the closed party parliamentary system which means...to enter politics in Canada, it's not what you know but who you know. The downside to that is our country is run by idiots ...case in point...Stephen Harper...before him...the idiot to end all idiots...Jean Cretien

onlyforbrian
27-04-2011, 01:36
By the way David...my brother-in-law is a Conservative member of the Canadian parliament, I just sent him an email to ask him to look into it...:whisper::cheerleader:

DavidB
27-04-2011, 02:15
By the way David...my brother-in-law is a Conservative member of the Canadian parliament, I just sent him an email to ask him to look into it...:whisper::cheerleader:

Bear in mind that signing the convention would probably eliminate a job in each Canadian Consulate (a few jobs in the larger ones). Embassies and Consulates are usually where politicians go to retire. :)

Bogatyr
27-04-2011, 18:09
Greetings. Married to Russian citizen, currently living in US, plan to retire in Russia. I am working to get a jump on TRP requirements and have not found the answer to a couple of questions thus far. Hoping that someone will see my plea for assistance and willing to share the info. If I get the FBI background check/finger prints (certificate good for 90 days) prior to departing US, can I apply for TRP before the 90 day expiration of the background check to avoid acquiring FBI background check from Russia? Simplified version of my question is how long after arriving in Russia can I submit for a TRP? If the answer is immediately upon arrival in Russia of course upon compiling all required documentation to include the medical, can the very determined get it into the system within 90 days?

A discussion topic I have not been able to find is someone who retires in the US with a pension, TRP to PRP in Russia with pension the only source of income. Not planning to work after retirement, current logic to provide previous year income tax statement and/or retire pay monthly statements?

Hope to make a renewed contribution here for the benefit of others.

Thanks in advance.

Some suggestions:

Ignore what the Canadian said about the Foreign Affairs office stamps on your criminal background check (CBC), it doesn't apply to you (an American), read instead the Apostille thread for Americans.

In short: try to time your trip so that your CBC is as "young" as it can be to give you enough time. Make sure you read the FBI web page instructions to get a CBC with a signature on it so that you can get it Apostille'd the US Dept. of State in Washington, DC.

I did my CBC the "old/hard" way, just before the FBI started applying signatures upon request: I attached a notary public affadavit stating the CBC was the "true original CBC from the FBI showing result of no arrest record", and had *that* Apostilled. An Apostille is simply a statement that the document was signed by a recognized authority (e.g., government official, or notary public). Luckily, it was accepted by my FMS without question.

Every FMS office is different in what documents they require, I recommend getting two Apostilled versions of your:
+ criminal background check (you only have one original of this)
+ birth certificate
+ marriage certificate
+ university diplomas

In my case they only looked at the CBC and the marriage cert. (and of course the translated notarized passport, that's a given).

Also make sure if you want to drive to get an International Driver's Permit (AAA can do this if you're a member, it may be worth joining just for this if you're not).

I think the application can be made in less than a month if you: + do it full time; + choose a region and time of year that is not so busy [ For example, in St. Petersburg the clinics all are "one-stop service" for the entire battery of tests you need so you can do all the medicals in one day easily], and + plan carefully. . Some regions have vastly larger populations than others, and so the FMS offices have differing workloads. I'd venture a guess that more "upscale" regions would tend to have less busy FMS offices (less immigrant workers to process), but that is just guess.

Allow a couple of days for all the notarized translations of the Apostilled documents (get about 3 "original" notarized translations of your passport as well, you'll need it alot even after receiving TRP (for example, to notarize anything else) and have to give them in permanently in a few places), and 1 of each .

So I'd recommend the following order, upon arrival:
+ find your FMS office, and *note carefully* their schedule, they have on and off days and different time ranges for different types of requests. Learning the schedule properly can save you a week or more in lost time just waiting for the right time range for your request.
+ find approved translators and approved medical clinics that your FMS office recognizes
+ get all your documents translated/notarized
+ get your medical
+ once you have your translated notarized docs, make your first visit for review of your docs, and pick up the TRP application form (you could try to go earlier to get the form).
+ Russian officials do not accept corrections on forms: it's worth it to have a scanner and printer with you so you can scan all form blanks and re-print them out if needed. You could probably also partially fill out forms and scan them if needed, some people do that with the registration forms I understand.

Be prepared to leave the country while waiting. You could live in Russia while waiting but it will take usually 2 exit/enter trips to get new 90-day visas while you're waiting. Or you could return to the US to wait before you move here. That way you don't combine the hassle of an international move with the hassle of the TRP.

I'd also recommend arranging a 90 day visa for the TRP application trip, just so you're not up against a difficult deadline with all the prep you need to do.

As for whether or not the pension is sufficient, it probably is, the minimum income required is pretty low (around $300/month) you just need to show every year your proof of income & Russian taxes paid while on TRP/PRP.

Good luck!

EagleyeRC
27-04-2011, 19:24
A strategy focus for me is to minimize the separation from family pains. Sounds something like - return flight to US with invitation letter in hand, apply for new private visa, back home (Russia) within 7-10 days. Doing this 3 times will definitely chip away a chunk of savings. First time to apply for TRP and 2 times waiting for approval. Or wait for the TRP, then make the move. Thanks so much for the excellent tips, that really got me rolling with a plan.

DavidB
27-04-2011, 19:51
A strategy focus for me is to minimize the separation from family pains. Sounds something like - return flight to US with invitation letter in hand, apply for new private visa, back home (Russia) within 7-10 days. Doing this 3 times will definitely chip away a chunk of savings. First time to apply for TRP and 2 times waiting for approval. Or wait for the TRP, then make the move. Thanks so much for the excellent tips, that really got me rolling with a plan.

You can get visas processed quickly (1-2 days) in Kiev, Berlin or Vilnius. Still expensive, but cheaper than flying all the way back to the US for a visa. Search for other threads about the exact process. Usually you need to use an agency with contacts in the Embassy to speed up the process.

Bogatyr
27-04-2011, 20:22
You can get visas processed quickly (1-2 days) in Kiev, Berlin or Vilnius. Still expensive, but cheaper than flying all the way back to the US for a visa. Search for other threads about the exact process. Usually you need to use an agency with contacts in the Embassy to speed up the process.

Yes this is what I did. The frequent recommendation is to use Vadim @ Liga consulting in Moscow (you can work with him over the phone & email, & pay with Western Union, you don't have to physically be in Moscow to work with him). My two same-day visas were arranged by Vadim, both went smoothly. Also note that it takes about 30 days to get private visas processed in the Russian FMS so you need to plan ahead if you're going to do the "stay in Russia and wait" TRP approach. Definitely way less hassle and less expensive than traveling back to the US.

android
29-04-2011, 21:07
Hi...I have been reading all the threads in regards to the TRP and PRP rules and I wanted to ask another question that I have not been able to deduce from the current threads. Basically, HOW LONG does one have in order to pick up their TRP after you have been notified that you are approved and to go pick it up?

Timing seems to be extremely key in the TRP procedure with criminal background checks, visas, health exams, etc.

SCENERIO:
Assuming you fly from the USA (with your Russian spouse) on a 90 day private visa with as much documents notarized as you can. Get those translated and notorized in Russia. Get the permission of your in laws to live with them and the paid utility bills. Open a bank account and put a bunch of cash(rubles) in it. Do the health exam. Plus anything else I might have left off the list. Go down to your in laws local FMS for the final time (assuming you went a couple times and needed more paperwork) and they FINALLY accept your application.

You then leave Russia to head back to the USA before the original 90 day visa is up and wait for a phone call from your relatives that you can go to the FMS to pick up the TRP. How long will they wait to let you come pick it up before it is invalid and the process has to be repeated?

I was hoping up to 6 months...because you would then need to finalize your affairs in the USA (assuming you are going to live the 3 full years the TRP grants you), get another visa and fly back to Russia.

If you only have a few weeks or something...then it would be necessary to STAY in Russia the whole time the TRP is being reviewed and keep doing visa runs every 3 months.

Thanks for any clarification on the timing of TRP pick up!

DavidB
29-04-2011, 21:18
Android - I don't know the answer to your question about how long you have to collect the TRP once it's approved.

However, if you arrive on a 1-year business visa in the first place, you can stay without any visa runs. When you apply for TRP, you can get a 'spravka' which allows you to extend your registration until the TRP application has been processed. You then take that spravka to the local FMS office where you would usually do visa registration. They will stamp your migration card with an extension, which allows you to legally stay in Russia. You have to keep doing this each 90 days until you get an answer about your TRP.

Bogatyr
30-04-2011, 22:09
Android - I don't know the answer to your question about how long you have to collect the TRP once it's approved.

However, if you arrive on a 1-year business visa in the first place, you can stay without any visa runs. When you apply for TRP, you can get a 'spravka' which allows you to extend your registration until the TRP application has been processed. You then take that spravka to the local FMS office where you would usually do visa registration. They will stamp your migration card with an extension, which allows you to legally stay in Russia. You have to keep doing this each 90 days until you get an answer about your TRP.

I'd be careful with this -- one FMS office might allow that, while other might not. And if one's citizenship is of the sort where the reciprocal visa regime allows only "90 days in out of 180 consecutive days" for 1 year Russian visas then you may not be able to stay consecutively longer than 90 days no matter what. Also, in my case my FMS office did not like me applying for TRP while being in Russia on a business visa while I was living with my family, they insisted I acquire a private visa for my 2 visa runs while waiting for TRP. It didn't matter that I could make a reasonable case that I was doing business. So it depends on your FMS office.

As for the max time allowed to pick up the TRP, I don't know, but I think the time is measured in months. There is a special visa for a person who is entering to pick up TRP, and I understand that visa is good for 4 months, so perhaps that's the approximate time line.

You can leave Russia after you get the TRP, it only takes about 10 days to process the new TRP special visa which is good for 3 years now. So you could conceivably wrap up your affairs later (but you have to be inside Russia for more than 6 months a year to keep the TRP, supposedly).

Tony P
01-05-2011, 02:42
There is a special visa for a person who is entering to pick up TRP, and I understand that visa is good for 4 months,
Can you provide any more details or a link please?

Bogatyr
02-05-2011, 00:52
Can you provide any more details or a link please?

Can't dig up the details with a quick google search, do some searching on this forum and on the FMS site and you may find it.

das0405
10-06-2011, 17:20
Brian,
I received my TRP in March just a few days after arriving from Vancouver. We now have my exit visa as well and we are just now starting to look at how to complete the PRP process.
How are you? How did your surgery go and are you now in Russia? What is status of your TRP?
I forgot to bring your e mail address - hence I am trying to contact you through the expat.ru site.
All the best
Dave

Golden
27-04-2013, 16:45
..and HERE IS THE IMPORTANT PART !! You must go to your local American foreign affairs office and get your police check stamped, and then take it to your closest Russian consulate and get them to stamp it (Russian burocrats love stamps) if you do not have these two rubber stamps when you try to present it with your documents in Russia, they WILL NOT ACCEPT IT! Ask me how I know...been there, done that...hope this helps.

Dear friend,
I also am a Canadian going through the same process ( TRP ).

The Police Certificate you obtained from Canada. Did you have to AUTHENTICATE the ORIGINAL ( from DFAIT ) or the CERTIFIED TRUE COPY ?

Which one they ask for at the Local UFMS Office ???


My Second Question is:
Once you have applied and hand in all the required documents to the Local UFMS Office, and they give you the Receipt/Acknowledgement "SPRAVKA" that you have made an application. Can this "SPRAVKA" be sufficient to allow you NOT TO LEAVE YOUR WIFE AND FAMILY and GO AWAY, as the Private Visa is of course expiring before obtaining the TRP ???

Thanks again for you kind reply.:bell:
Moscow.

Remington
27-04-2013, 19:23
My Second Question is:
Once you have applied and hand in all the required documents to the Local UFMS Office, and they give you the Receipt/Acknowledgement "SPRAVKA" that you have made an application. Can this "SPRAVKA" be sufficient to allow you NOT TO LEAVE YOUR WIFE AND FAMILY and GO AWAY, as the Private Visa is of course expiring before obtaining the TRP ???

You will have to leave Russia and apply for another visa until you get TRP. There's no way you can extend your current visa.

yakspeare
28-04-2013, 16:43
It's a stupid system. Here in Turkey you make an apointment to get your residency at a date sometimes 1-2 months in the future. During that time, if your visa expires, you are allowed to stay-once you have an appointment you can get your residency the VERY same day. And you can apply for residency from 1-5 years. So unbelievably easy compared to Russia.

Benedikt
28-04-2013, 16:51
It's a stupid system. Here in Turkey you make an apointment to get your residency at a date sometimes 1-2 months in the future. During that time, if your visa expires, you are allowed to stay-once you have an appointment you can get your residency the VERY same day. And you can apply for residency from 1-5 years. So unbelievably easy compared to Russia.



so they can do whatever they want. even if other EU countries or any other country might make it difficult for Turks to become citizens there. Russia of course could do the same, but the go the tit for tat approach and have these paranoid ideas that everyone is an enemy and has to be checked 5 times before you get a little stamp. the cold war mentality is still wide and awake and it will take years to get away. we all know it would need only one word and all would be easy, but suppose he also still has his brains ingrained from KGB doctrine.

rgreen
01-05-2013, 20:12
Some good news. I just got the FBI (USA) police report and the apostille. It took TWO WEEKS !!!!!!!

Here is how. Look on the FBI web site. It will give a list of private companies that can obtain the FBI report for you. It cost $80 (I was told it now takes the FBI at least 3 months if you go directly to them) and takes one day plus the mailing time. BUT HERE IS THE CATCH: The FBI now has a new form that only some companies have access to as of this writing. The new form has a SEAL on it and is SIGNED by a woman named Kimberly D???? You MUST have this new form so be sure to ask the company if they can get the new form.
(this new form was only approved in the middle of April, 2013. I would assume that over time all of the companies will be able to get this form - I used a company from the state of R. Island). Then you sent this form to the US Sec of State (I called them and talked to a very nice woman on the phone who was very helpful). It only takes 3 days for them to stamp the FBI form. But you must have the new form to get the 3 days service. (I don't know why). But it really was that easy.

All you need to send to the private company is your fingerprints (2 sets) and 2 forms of ID.

I did this in the USA. But I think that you could do it quickly from Russia using DHL. (I am not sure but I think I read somewhere that the State Dept will mail documents to the USA embassy in Moscow).

Bogatyr
06-05-2013, 17:52
Some good news. I just got the FBI (USA) police report and the apostille. It took TWO WEEKS !!!!!!!

Here is how. Look on the FBI web site. It will give a list of private companies that can obtain the FBI report for you. It cost $80 (I was told it now takes the FBI at least 3 months if you go directly to them) and takes one day plus the mailing time. BUT HERE IS THE CATCH: The FBI now has a new form that only some companies have access to as of this writing. The new form has a SEAL on it and is SIGNED by a woman named Kimberly D???? You MUST have this new form so be sure to ask the company if they can get the new form.
(this new form was only approved in the middle of April, 2013. I would assume that over time all of the companies will be able to get this form - I used a company from the state of R. Island). Then you sent this form to the US Sec of State (I called them and talked to a very nice woman on the phone who was very helpful). It only takes 3 days for them to stamp the FBI form. But you must have the new form to get the 3 days service. (I don't know why). But it really was that easy.

All you need to send to the private company is your fingerprints (2 sets) and 2 forms of ID.

I did this in the USA. But I think that you could do it quickly from Russia using DHL. (I am not sure but I think I read somewhere that the State Dept will mail documents to the USA embassy in Moscow).

Thanks for the info! Don't be afraid to name names: what company did you use? This site is all about getting detailed advice and resources on the TRP process, and the FBI CBC step is without a doubt the most involved. If a company did a great job for you, let us know which one!

yogateacher
11-05-2013, 18:47
great info. Thank you.

puertapimpa
03-07-2013, 12:39
Entry and Exit from Russia while Temporary Residence is being processed I was told that I could leave and return to Russia at any point in time on my current visa. :rules:

Just remember, once they put the stamp "Разрешено Временное Проживание" or Temporary Residence Permit in your passport, they will NULL your old Visa. So I recommend not to get any stamps until you know you don't have to leave Russia.

After getting the Temporary Residence stamp, you MUST APPLY for a separate ENTRY/EXIT Visa. So for example, I have three stamps in my passport:
1) Registration Stamp
2) Temporary Residence Stamp
3) Entry/Exit Visa good for three years

I still get the Immigration Card everytime I go through customs, so make sure not to lose it.

Bogatyr
04-07-2013, 17:37
Just remember, once they put the stamp "Разрешено Временное Проживание" or Temporary Residence Permit in your passport, they will NULL your old Visa. So I recommend not to get any stamps until you know you don't have to leave Russia.

After getting the Temporary Residence stamp, you MUST APPLY for a separate ENTRY/EXIT Visa. So for example, I have three stamps in my passport:
1) Registration Stamp
2) Temporary Residence Stamp
3) Entry/Exit Visa good for three years

I still get the Immigration Card everytime I go through customs, so make sure not to lose it.

In St. Petersburg they don't stamp the TRP visa into the passport, but instead give a separate TRP visa (on green paper) folded into 3 parts. Upon first exit from Russia they take one of the 3 parts (freaked me out when it happened, I thought they had ruined my visa!), and thereafter they don't take anything more from it.

I also asked about migration cards when I received PRP since I've read here that you supposedly don't need them, but my УФМС lady said migration cards are required as that is the way they keep track of entries/exits.

What are PRP holders supposed to write in the "visa number" section on the migration card? Your PRP number? Last time I entered on TRP I put the TRP visa number there, and just didn't circle anything of the "private/tourist/business" choices.

SV1973a
04-07-2013, 19:38
In St. Petersburg they don't stamp the TRP visa into the passport, but instead give a separate TRP visa (on green paper) folded into 3 parts. Upon first exit from Russia they take one of the 3 parts (freaked me out when it happened, I thought they had ruined my visa!), and thereafter they don't take anything more from it.

I also asked about migration cards when I received PRP since I've read here that you supposedly don't need them, but my УФМС lady said migration cards are required as that is the way they keep track of entries/exits.

What are PRP holders supposed to write in the "visa number" section on the migration card? Your PRP number? Last time I entered on TRP I put the TRP visa number there, and just didn't circle anything of the "private/tourist/business" choices.

Actually, there are two conflicting regulations about whether or not you should fill in a migration card as PRP holder.
One says that all foreigners are required to fill in a migration card, the other says that people that are residing in Russia do not need to fill in a migration card.

Fran1
12-07-2013, 00:57
Very useful and informative post. I have to read it carefully. Thank you very much for sharing.

Bogatyr
12-07-2013, 16:57
Actually, there are two conflicting regulations about whether or not you should fill in a migration card as PRP holder.
One says that all foreigners are required to fill in a migration card, the other says that people that are residing in Russia do not need to fill in a migration card.
Pulkovo-2 border control is so far firmly in the first (needing it) camp.

Remington
13-07-2013, 21:57
Finally I got my Permanent Resident Permit today! :hooray:

Judge
15-07-2013, 12:11
Finally I got my Permanent Resident Permit today! :hooray:

Congrats, crack open a bottle of vodka..:10518:

Edmundhusserl
04-08-2013, 02:02
Hi! I have a question. I have recently obtained rashrenie na vremennoe prozhivanie. I understand that I now need an exit visa to leave Russia (?). Do you know how to obtain this, and how long it takes?

Thank you!

Hans.KK
04-08-2013, 10:01
Just search the forum, "exit visa" as search words will do fine.
This subject is often on debate, but not much has changed over the years about this.
Whether you can get a one-time visa (every time you need to leave Russia), or you may get a multi-visa, apparently depend on the local politics at the place where you apply.