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View Full Version : Belarus... visa or no visa?



TheWolf
27-01-2013, 14:27
Thinking about going to Belarus in the near future. Straight there from Moscow, train, no other countries involved other than Russia and Belarus. Supposedly, you 'need' a visa to go there, but Belarussians I know have said that it isn't worth it since they never check you. Has anyone been to Belarus from Russia without a visa and got away with it? And what would be the potential 'punishment' if you were caught? :confused:

rubyrussia
27-01-2013, 15:33
Why don't you just go and find out! Please be sure to update us on how things went!

Delta268
28-01-2013, 19:48
Unlikely to get caught if you are not staying in hotels or somehow getting into trouble. But if you do get caught, it is rather unpleasant. Not to be recommended.

sashadidi
29-01-2013, 09:36
I did it but I would not do it again!!!

FatAndy
29-01-2013, 11:45
Thinking about going to Belarus in the near future. Straight there from Moscow, train, no other countries involved other than Russia and Belarus. Supposedly, you 'need' a visa to go there, but Belarussians I know have said that it isn't worth it since they never check you. Has anyone been to Belarus from Russia without a visa and got away with it? And what would be the potential 'punishment' if you were caught? :confused:
Go to Belorussian consulate and make visa - you'll have no potential problems and punishments at all.

http://www.embassybel.ru/consular-questions/

http://www.embassybel.ru/consular-questions/visa-questions/

valentrina
29-01-2013, 19:55
You definitely need a visa, but I'm pretty sure it's not difficult to get.

Lost American
16-02-2013, 00:32
Take it from a guy who spent 2 1/2 nights in Belarus custody, Get a visa. Its easy. Just do it.

sis
16-02-2013, 01:39
if you dont have a visa, they will make you get a photo taken(if you dont have a passport photo), helth insurance at belgostrach, and pay a fine (about the same cost as the visa) at the local police department. You have 24hrs to get out of the country

visa for us citizens is about $200, veitnamese can travel visa free.

Arthuro
16-02-2013, 03:26
I almost sure vietnamese need a visa to Belarus, and surely need it to Russia

Alan65
16-02-2013, 14:58
You definitely need a visa, but I'm pretty sure it's not difficult to get.

When you enter Russia the landing card say Russia and Belarus, i asked a friend If this allowed me to go to Belarus, not that I was thinking of going there I was just curious....it was the first time I had noticed it after about 10 visits.

FatAndy
18-02-2013, 12:45
When you enter Russia the landing card say Russia and Belarus
Yes, because since several years ago we had common customs area and free border for citizens of both countries. So border control systems were united also. But NOT for other nationals. Later on Kazakhstan has joined. Ukraine is in the queue.

Alan65
18-02-2013, 13:39
Yes, because since several years ago we had common customs area and free border for citizens of both countries. So border control systems were united also. But NOT for other nationals. Later on Kazakhstan has joined. Ukraine is in the queue.

It will be interesting to see what happens with the Ukraine, they are also going down the route of the EU as are Moldova and Georgia.

I get the impression the Ukraine is like a fella in a club chatting to 2 different women and can not make up his mind which to go with

http://www.kyivpost.com/content/ukraine/yanukovych-signing-association-agreement-priority-for-kyiv-at-current-stage-of-relations-with-eu-320474.html

FatAndy
18-02-2013, 14:17
It will be interesting to see what happens with the Ukraine, they are also going down the route of the EU as are Moldova and Georgia.

I get the impression the Ukraine is like a fella in a club chatting to 2 different women and can not make up his mind which to go with

http://www.kyivpost.com/content/ukraine/yanukovych-signing-association-agreement-priority-for-kyiv-at-current-stage-of-relations-with-eu-320474.html

Yes, they (I mean UA politicians) still have illusions that EU needs them. Ha-ha 3 times. BTW not like fella with 2 women, but woman and 2 fellows.

Marc Oilman
18-02-2013, 18:11
If you're from outside the CIS, get a separate visa. I also had people from there say that when you drive in there is no border control, no highway patrol, etc. and, if you're not traveling by train, it would seem easy to do. BUT....what if you get stopped by the police? What if you accidentally get caught up in some kind of fight and the police bring everyone in? I once went by car into Kazakhstan, with a visa (in 2000) and the border guards just asked me "what the weather was like in America". They didn't stamp my passport. I went back by train and it was an open border (nobody checked the way they do from the Baltics)..........but.....I stayed with my ex-wife and did not register....when I got back, afterwards, I found out that I was required to register within three days and had I gotten caught there would have been a hefty fine (I think around $300). Also, on the way back they might not have believed my (true) story that the guards did not bother to stamp my passport. The bottom line - it's a stupid risk and ask them to stamp your passport when you are on ex-USSR territory, even if they don't automatically do it.

FatAndy
18-02-2013, 18:42
If you're from outside the CIS, get a separate visa. I also had people from there say that when you drive in there is no border control, no highway patrol, etc. and, if you're not traveling by train, it would seem easy to do. BUT....what if you get stopped by the police? What if you accidentally get caught up in some kind of fight and the police bring everyone in? I once went by car into Kazakhstan, with a visa (in 2000) and the border guards just asked me "what the weather was like in America". They didn't stamp my passport. I went back by train and it was an open border (nobody checked the way they do from the Baltics)..........but.....I stayed with my ex-wife and did not register....when I got back, afterwards, I found out that I was required to register within three days and had I gotten caught there would have been a hefty fine (I think around $300). Also, on the way back they might not have believed my (true) story that the guards did not bother to stamp my passport. The bottom line - it's a stupid risk and ask them to stamp your passport when you are on ex-USSR territory, even if they don't automatically do it.

Marc, you're absolutely right - more paper means cleaner @$$... ;)