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3gWC5OlNo4S
11-12-2012, 05:48
Hello,

I apologize for such a basic question, however, I've been unable to locate a definite answer thus far.

I'm a US citizen and will be vacationing in Russia for a few months on either a tourist or business visa (although I will not be visiting for professional reasons).

However, I currently work for a US employer and my job position allows me the ability to telecommute, which means I could work remote during my stay in Russia, possibly allowing me to stay for a longer duration. However, I assume this is probably illegal under Russian law and I would like to verify.

Can anyone confirm if it is possible for me to legally comply with Russian tax/employment law and still work for a US employer during my temporary stay in Russia? Or is there a reliable legal reference where I can obtain such information?

Thanks in advance for any assistance.

Arthuro
11-12-2012, 22:39
I suppose it's illegal to work on a business visa, but if nobody knows - then nobody cares unless you're a spy.

scd167
11-12-2012, 22:54
I suppose it's illegal to work on a business visa, but if nobody knows - then nobody cares unless you're a spy.

Many expatriates work in Russia on business visas... it is not correct but it happens. There is no way for anyone to figure out what you are doing unless you tell people I think.

Arthuro
11-12-2012, 23:01
Well, there is a way of course, but noone would care if you work mostly at home, don't earn crazy amount of money and don't commit anything serious

inorcist
12-12-2012, 00:39
I assume, you won't be paid in Russia neither does your work require you to be in Russia. So, I don't really see an issue.

Btw, does your company have an office in Russia?

frankjohn2
12-12-2012, 10:19
Does your US employer have an office in Russia?

Is the work you are doing based in Russia (not where you are doing the work, but where the output of your work is being received)?

Is your income being paid to you in Russia?

I doubt that any of the answers are yes, so you are not really "working" in Russia.

Russian tax/employment law should not apply unless one or more of the answers are yes.

However, I am not a lawyer or a tax accountant - these are just my opinions. My personal opinions on these types of things are usually spot on.

ilya25
14-12-2012, 01:22
Hello,

I apologize for such a basic question, however, I've been unable to locate a definite answer thus far.

I'm a US citizen and will be vacationing in Russia for a few months on either a tourist or business visa (although I will not be visiting for professional reasons).

However, I currently work for a US employer and my job position allows me the ability to telecommute, which means I could work remote during my stay in Russia, possibly allowing me to stay for a longer duration. However, I assume this is probably illegal under Russian law and I would like to verify.

Can anyone confirm if it is possible for me to legally comply with Russian tax/employment law and still work for a US employer during my temporary stay in Russia? Or is there a reliable legal reference where I can obtain such information?

Thanks in advance for any assistance.

You said that you would be on vacations here- meaning that you don't have to work during that time - so enjoy your time here :)

No legally you cannot work here being on a tourist/business visa, to work you need working visa and work permit and to obtain them the emplyer should be in Russia. So you will be formally violating immigration rules and your employer will be violating tax/immigration/employment requirements (they should register an office to have you here formally to perform work duties for them)

But as was said since your activities are not related to Russia, you are not paid, you do it not from an office chances that this will dicovered are close to 0

Also if you stay in Russia more then 183 days (not sure that your visa allows you though) in a calendar year you will have to decalre and pay Russian income tax on your US income