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RichardB
13-11-2012, 14:31
Oh my brain hurts with this...

The following words can be used as either PS or PC


Usually (PS)
Often (PS)
Currently (PS/PC)
This year (PC)
Nowadays (PC)
At the moment (PS/PC)
Every day (PS)
Once a month (PS)
These days (PS/PC)
Now (PC)
Most of them I can understand but 3, 6 and 9 are confusing me. I found the exact same question on the internet but even they seem to be a bit confused.

Does anyone have any examples that my frazzled, simple brain can understand?

okiey
13-11-2012, 14:58
Looks like both variants can be used for 3,6 and 9:)

Jas
13-11-2012, 15:52
Oh my brain hurts with this...

The following words can be used as either PS or PC


Usually (PS)
Often (PS)
Currently (PS/PC)
This year (PC)
Nowadays (PC)
At the moment (PS/PC)
Every day (PS)
Once a month (PS)
These days (PS/PC)
Now (PC)
Most of them I can understand but 3, 6 and 9 are confusing me. I found the exact same question on the internet but even they seem to be a bit confused.

Does anyone have any examples that my frazzled, simple brain can understand?

This is frequency adverbs and stuff. This is what we use with Present Simple. Everyone knows. Even kids know this. However, some frequency adverbs can be used with pc and ps- if pc is for a long action, like not one that is happening now- but around now.
PC is like this-
Now- I am typing now.
Around now- I am eating so much this month (but ure not eating at this moment exactly)
Future stuff- I'm meeting Tony tomorrow
So we can use "Currently" for PC when we are in reference to not now exactly- but at a time around now. That's why it's both. PS can come with currently also- when PS is for a action that's long but the focus is now. Like this- Sherin currently works in Karachi in a bank. This is at the present time- around now and it comes with a PS verb cos it's a longish type of action more like a routine.
Nowadays is like this- but not quite. It is more focused on present time and so it comes with PC- not PS-PC.
These days can be both.
Nowadays and these days is really about 'aspect' which is to say how the speaker sees time.
So u shud be careful cos u cud say-"Nowadays she's working in Sialkot." It's ok to say that.
But in IELTS grammar, u wud be more advised to put the pc verb.

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:00
Oh my brain hurts with this...

The following words can be used as either PS or PC


Usually (PS)
Often (PS)
Currently (PS/PC)
This year (PC)
Nowadays (PC)
At the moment (PS/PC)
Every day (PS)
Once a month (PS)
These days (PS/PC)
Now (PC)
Most of them I can understand but 3, 6 and 9 are confusing me. I found the exact same question on the internet but even they seem to be a bit confused.

Does anyone have any examples that my frazzled, simple brain can understand?



PS is just routines and habits and what u do every day. Also it can be for timetables. Also it can come for preferences. Question form is DO\DOES. Also u got rules of s, es, ies on the end of the he.she, it verb.

PC is another. It is what is happening now, or around now, or in the future also. Verb is present participle with ing and question form is IS\Are\AM=Present participle also of couse.

Here is some examples.

The cat drinks milk. - When? Now? No it is not. So? So every time. So? So it is present simple then.

The cat is drinking milk. When? Every time? No- it is doing it now. So? So it is present continuos.

That 's the basic rule.

At the moment the cat drinks milk.

Does it come?

I think no. So is At the moment- PC and PS? Or is it PC only?

RichardB
13-11-2012, 16:03
This will be a first for me but.... I have to almost agree with you Jas.

Mind you, the grammar and spelling is, as usual, atrocious and stuff. Don't give up your day job.

And thank you.

okiey
13-11-2012, 16:04
Around now- I am eating so much this month (but ure not eating at this moment exactly)


That is grammatically incorrect. You cannot use present continuous for something you are not doing right now.

I have been eating a lot this month.
I ate a lot this month.
I have eaten a lot this month.

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:05
[QUOTE=RichardB;1087099]Oh my brain hurts with this...

Now PC
QUOTE]

No cos now can be used with Present Simple also. Like with state verbs- which can not take ing cos they are not actions they are states.
Like how?
Like this:

I am drinking water now.
I am typing now.
This is ok.

Can I say, I am hating you now, or I am needing the book now?
No- it's no good of course.
Why?
Cos hate and need are state verbs.

So?
So now can come with a PS verb. How? Like this.....

She hates him now and ignores him.
I like it now.
This rice smells funny now- just smell it. Ugh!

So now can clearly come with PS verbs.

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:08
That is grammatically incorrect. You cannot use present continuous for something you are not doing right now.

I have been eating a lot this month.
I ate a lot this month.
I have eaten a lot this month.

Yes u can. Present Con has 3 uses and I memorized it for IELTS. Here they are:

1) NOW
2) AROUND NOW- TEMPORARY
3) FUTURE

Example of 2 is like this: I'm reading a jolly good book by Kipling at the moment.

However, the speaker has no book in his hands. How come? Cos the PC verb can be used for actions not specifically happening now- as in rule NUmber 2.

Er, do u get it now Okiey, or not?

okiey
13-11-2012, 16:14
" I'm reading a jolly good book by Kipling at the moment." This is fine

"I am eating so much this month" incorrect ... you are defining PC to a specific period -- needs a perfect tense

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:15
In Pakistan International School, what u get are verb tables, like hundreds of pages and u just learn them heart by heart and if u do that- most surely will u be ok with any grammar cos u will know the rules.

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:18
" I'm reading a jolly good book by Kipling at the moment." This is fine

"I am eating so much this month" incorrect ... you are defining PC to a specific period -- needs a perfect tense

Look, it's like this.

What's wrong with her today?
She's working nights in the hosital in Rawalapindi for the whole week.


Is she working in the hospital now?
No! She's lying flat out in bed and she's snoring.
What don't u get about this? It's just IELTS level 1!!!
This contradicts ure initial statement 100%.
U was rong about that initial statement that PC cud not come when it's with a temporay action and ure wrong also that when the time clause is there- it needs to be a perfect tense.

okiey
13-11-2012, 16:24
[QUOTE=Jas;1087168]Look, it's like this.

What's wrong with her today?
She's working nights in the hosital in Rawalapindi for the whole week.

What is wrong with her today?
She is down about HAVING TO work nights this week in Rawalpindi hospital.


Is she working in the hospital now? NOPE

No! She's lying flat out in bed and she's snoring. CORRECT, so the answer cannot be PC

What don't u get about this? It's just IELTS level 1!!!
This contradicts ure initial statement 100%.

Jas this is childrens stuff

okiey
13-11-2012, 16:31
What this is what you are trying to convey

At the bar in the evening.

Peter: have you seen Luke recently? [we don't define a time frame]
Paul: no, he's working nights this week.

Peter: where's Luke tonight? [i.e., now]
Paul: he's working nights. [he is doing it now]

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:31
[QUOTE=Jas;1087168]Look, it's like this.

What's wrong with her today?
She's working nights in the hosital in Rawalapindi for the whole week.

What is wrong with her today?
She is down about HAVING TO work nights this week in Rawalpindi hospital.


Is she working in the hospital now? NOPE

No! She's lying flat out in bed and she's snoring. CORRECT, so the answer cannot be PC

What don't u get about this? It's just IELTS level 1!!!
This contradicts ure initial statement 100%.

Jas this is childrens stuff


Yes, so why don't u get it?

okiey
13-11-2012, 16:32
What this is what you are trying to convey

Excuse my mistake

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:34
[QUOTE=Jas;1087168]Look, it's like this.

What's wrong with her today?
She's working nights in the hosital in Rawalapindi for the whole week.

What is wrong with her today?
She is down about HAVING TO work nights this week in Rawalpindi hospital.


Is she working in the hospital now? NOPE

No! She's lying flat out in bed and she's snoring. CORRECT, so the answer cannot be PC



Ure just fooling about so get lost. Of course it is PC cos she doesn't have to be doing it when we're telling about a temporary action around now.
At least RichardB was asking proper questions. U got no clue.

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:35
" I'm reading a jolly good book by Kipling at the moment." This is fine



Contradicted by his later statement that PC can't be used in the hospital example. Duh.

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:42
What this is what you are trying to convey

At the bar in the evening.

Peter: have you seen Luke recently? [we don't define a time frame]
Paul: no, he's working nights this week.

Peter: where's Luke tonight? [i.e., now]
Paul: he's working nights. [he is doing it now]

Er, ure conveying result like u do with a perfect tense.
Or, ure saying that what ure doing (though not at the moment) is not part of ure normal routine and is being done for a limited time.

It's just so basic but cos u dont know what's the rules- of course it will be hard for u.

okiey
13-11-2012, 16:44
Jas you don't catch the smaller nuances of the English language.

I am reading a good book by Kipling at the moment -- means I am in the process of reading it, maybe not at this very instance.

I am working nights this week is fine, but not if we are specifically defining what I am doing at this very moment -- i.e., lying in bed sleeping.

Jas
13-11-2012, 16:51
Jas you don't catch the smaller nuances of the English language.

.

Yes I do. I get everything cos I am a native speaker. This means that smaller nuances and such which wud lose even a very fluent Pakistani- never have the same effect on me in any way.

Ian G
13-11-2012, 17:29
Richard B- an attempt to answer your question:


Well all these phrases (with the exception of 1 and 2 ) refer to the present. Remember- the present always includes the immediate past. Just how much past- a couple of seconds, 5 minutes or 5000 years-depends on the situation. A football commentator and a geologist will have different concepts of the present. But they will both use the present continuous to describe processes (whether interrupted or uninterrupted- it doesn't matter) going on at the moment of speaking.


So- all these phrases can be used with the present continuous.


I am currently reading your memo- I'll get back to you when I've finished.

The lift isn't working at the moment- you'll have to use the stairs.

These days more and more British companies are outsourcing their telephone services to call centres in India.


Still- I'd quibble about 1 and 2. Usually and often are expressions of habit. For habit we use present simple. Can anyone come up with a convincing sentence using often or usually with present continuous?

AstarD
13-11-2012, 17:35
You want to come and inspect the gas line tomorrow morning at 9? I'm usually leaving for work at that time.

yakspeare
13-11-2012, 17:39
present continious is used for the future for events that are sure to happen like meetings etc and of course getting married.

Going to get married-planned

Getting married-it will definitely happen. Date set, church booked etc

I am going to meet Tom tomorrow- I plan , intend to do this
I am meeting Tom tomorrow- this will happen, the meeting is scheduled

Ian G
13-11-2012, 17:40
Answer to Astar D
You want to come and inspect the gas line tomorrow morning at 9? I'm usually leaving for work at that time.




Good point. Not sure if this counts as present continuous:


I used to have no trouble getting up at 7 am but nowadays I'm often still lying in bed half awake half asleep trying to ignore the alarm clock at 9am.

Jas
13-11-2012, 18:28
Answer to Astar D



I used to have no trouble getting up at 7 am but nowadays I'm often still lying in bed half awake half asleep trying to ignore the alarm clock at 9am.

That's a temporary action. C above posts. I explained it to death already.

Jack17
13-11-2012, 19:21
Why is it that Ian and Yak's explanations are correct; but Jas' is far more entertaining - and correct? Go girl, you da bom!

Jas
13-11-2012, 20:32
Why is it that Ian and Yak's explanations are correct; but Jas' is far more entertaining - and correct? Go girl, you da bom!

Cos I took the time to learn the rules.

Jack17
13-11-2012, 20:43
Yes, but you also have a sparkling personality!

rusmeister
13-11-2012, 20:55
18 years of professional full-time teaching of EFL under my belt.

What you (the native speaker) should do is teach from a good grammar book for a few years. You will have learned the basics well by that time; that is, how the nuts and bolts mostly work in your own language and how to explain it to someone that doesn't have given particular nuts and bolts at all (such as articles, perfect tense or uni/multidirectional movement).

I'm too tired to engage here - who wants to continue their day job at night? - but the adverbs of frequency (except the special case of "always") are actually wrong with the present continuous, and the examples given are actually wrong. "I am usually doing anything" is wrong. It is a contradiction in terms. The exception is always is a standard accepted exception because it expresses something particular - anger and annoyance. Grammar means something; verb tenses mean something, and when you make a mistake it means something that is logically improbable or impossible ("I am knowing that I am in Moscow", etc). If you make a mistake, the mistake means something - usually something stupid or illogical - and I use that to teach grammar - I call it "stupid English".

You cannot use deliberately bad English here, even with the excuse of laziness, and expect to be accepted as an expert that knows what he or she is talking about. If you know the rules, apply them. SHOW that you know them. That way we don't have to waste time wondering about your literacy level and focus on your ideas.

When you can analyze every sentence, word and syllable that comes out of your mouth, then you can say you know the Matrix of English grammar, then you see, not confusing rules, but a coherent system, the 0's and 1's of the language. (Then you can kick Agent Smith's butt.)
I can, but I AIN'T gonna write that analysis here.

Jack17
13-11-2012, 21:11
I can, but I AIN'T gonna write that analysis here.

Good.

Nobbynumbnuts
14-11-2012, 03:55
Why is it that Ian and Yak's explanations are correct; but Jas' is far more entertaining - and correct? Go girl, you da bom!

Yup, what's that all about...........? :D

GalinaP
14-11-2012, 10:20
Exhausting as any grammar discussion can be, Jas's explanations are exhaustive, full stop.

Periwinkle
14-11-2012, 15:09
Look, it's like this.

What's wrong with her today?
She's working nights in the hosital in Rawalapindi for the whole week.


Is she working in the hospital now?
No! She's lying flat out in bed and she's snoring.
What don't u get about this? It's just IELTS level 1!!!
This contradicts ure initial statement 100%.
U was rong about that initial statement that PC cud not come when it's with a temporay action and ure wrong also that when the time clause is there- it needs to be a perfect tense.

Did you go to secondary school in Pakistan, then university in the UK?

Jas
14-11-2012, 15:31
Did you go to secondary school in Pakistan, then university in the UK?

Er, no. I went to Pakistan International School in the Gulf and then to university in the UK. I done me primary school in the UK also. So everything what I done is in the UK, except just secondary school.
Why do u want to know?

mrzuzzo
14-11-2012, 15:44
I done me primary school in the UK also. So everything what I done is in the UK, except just secondary school.

To the Brits up in this thread, do a lot of people from the UK actually talk like this?

All the British guys that I know actually talk in coherent, understandable, English.

:uk:

Jas
14-11-2012, 15:46
To the Brits up in this thread, do a lot of people from the UK actually talk like this?

All the British guys that I know actually talk in coherent, understandable, English.

:uk:

That's cos they're dumbing down what they're saying for ure benefit.:queen:

mrzuzzo
14-11-2012, 15:50
That's cos they're dumbing down what they're saying for ure benefit.:queen:

That must be it...

Charles Dickens and Mark Twain must have dumbed down their books for me too. Why didn't I think of this earlier?

yakspeare
14-11-2012, 16:00
To the Brits up in this thread, do a lot of people from the UK actually talk like this?

All the British guys that I know actually talk in coherent, understandable, English.

:uk:

I have never met anyone who writes like Jas does. Even people who have dropped out of school early. Her mistakes are rather unique. Still, she is usually understandable and falls within the range of English. But I would never recommend her to be a teacher. The bar is fairly low for ESL teaching in Russia(Even worse here in Turkey) so she could even be employed as such, but it wouldn't be a good idea.

Nobbynumbnuts
14-11-2012, 16:01
To the Brits up in this thread, do a lot of people from the UK actually talk like this?

All the British guys that I know actually talk in coherent, understandable, English.

:uk:

Do all Americans and Canadians speak in a coherent manner? You might want to think carefully before you answer..............;)

robertmf
14-11-2012, 21:30
Do all Americans and Canadians speak in a coherent manner?

You might want to think carefully before you answer..............;)

............... because you might get a 20 page answer from Rusmeister :sunny:

rusmeister
14-11-2012, 21:32
............... because you might get a 20 page answer from Rusmeister :sunny:



Yeah. God forbid we should have to think before we answer...

Periwinkle
14-11-2012, 21:33
Er, no. I went to Pakistan International School in the Gulf and then to university in the UK. I done me primary school in the UK also. So everything what I done is in the UK, except just secondary school.
Why do u want to know?

Just curious, I thought it was for foreigners not Brits. But suppose you needed some qualifier for a UK university.

Jack17
14-11-2012, 22:05
Jas, this is an honest question. You're a Liverpudlian and the dialect spoken in Liverpool is called Scourse, right? That's the English dialect you're using here, I assume, right? You can write and speak the Queen's English, I assume, right? If not, then this is really funny.

I mean, I can write Ebonics, caz dats da shisnicks in da hood; then, I can write and speak formal English too. I assume the same is true for you and Scouse?

MickeyTong
15-11-2012, 03:58
.... the dialect spoken in Liverpool is called Scourse, right?

Scouse.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHfIAoF8gEc

Nobbynumbnuts
15-11-2012, 04:35
............... because you might get a 20 page answer from Rusmeister :sunny:



Thanks okay, i've got a touch of insomnia today as it happens! ;)

Jas
15-11-2012, 10:04
Jas, this is an honest question. You're a Liverpudlian and the dialect spoken in Liverpool is called Scourse, right? That's the English dialect you're using here, I assume, right? You can write and speak the Queen's English, I assume, right? If not, then this is really funny.

I mean, I can write Ebonics, caz dats da shisnicks in da hood; then, I can write and speak formal English too. I assume the same is true for you and Scouse?

I went to university in Liverpool- but I am actually from another part of the UK entirely. Where that is exactly, is my business thanks. I don't speak scouse and I don't have a Liverpool accent either- but I do regard it as me adopted city.

mrzuzzo
15-11-2012, 12:40
I went to university in Liverpool- but I am actually from another part of the UK entirely.

Last time I checked, Pakistan was not part of the UK.



Where that is exactly, is my business thanks.

There is no way that sentence is properly structured.


I do regard it as me adopted city.

Seriously, why do you not write my instead of me? It just doesn't make sense to me. Do you purposefully write in bad English? Are there other people in the UK who write like this???

Jas
15-11-2012, 12:49
Last time I checked, Pakistan was not part of the UK.



There is no way that sentence is properly structured.



Seriously, why do you not write my instead of me? It just doesn't make sense to me. Do you purposefully write in bad English? Are there other people in the UK who write like this???

Who ever told Pakistan is part of the UK?

Why is it not properly structured?

I wud say most normal people in the UK do what I do, just go in a chat room and u will c for ureself. Maybe ure not a native speaker and don't know even how people chat in real life?

RichardB
15-11-2012, 13:01
most normal people in the UK do what I do

They most certainly do not. It's simply laziness on your part.

When you first arrived here your posts where in good, readable, intelligent English but since then you've turned lazy with your typing.

I challenge you to go for 48 hours typing in proper English and not your version of txt speak.

Will you rise to the challenge? :)

rusmeister
15-11-2012, 13:27
Who ever told Pakistan is part of the UK?

Why is it not properly structured?

I wud say most normal people in the UK do what I do, just go in a chat room and u will c for ureself. Maybe ure not a native speaker and don't know even how people chat in real life?

I agree with Richard. You go around "teaching" people English, but are unwilling or unable to produce good English yourself. I couldn't recommend anybody to turn to you for grammar advice. It would destroy my reputation. When you produce the King's English, if not Noah Webster's, the standard conventions that enable us to speak intelligently to one another, then I'll talk differently.
"told Pakistan"
"wud"
U, c, "ureself"

You may be a native speaker; I have not ruled out the fat man in Arizona, but you certainly cannot pass as a well-educated one, ahistorical fantasy novel ideas notwithstanding.

mds45
15-11-2012, 13:58
Who ever told Pakistan is part of the UK?

Why is it not properly structured?

I wud say most normal people in the UK do what I do, just go in a chat room and u will c for ureself. Maybe ure not a native speaker and don't know even how people chat in real life?

Most 12 year olds do in chat rooms, but then they grow up .

mds45
15-11-2012, 14:01
I agree with Richard. You go around "teaching" people English, but are unwilling or unable to produce good English yourself. I couldn't recommend anybody to turn to you for grammar advice. It would destroy my reputation. .

This is interesting, what reputation do you think you have rus? or were you not refering to this site, because on the site I would say you are the absolute opposite of jas, where she uses 1 word when 3 would be better you use 333 :)

Jas
15-11-2012, 14:14
They most certainly do not. It's simply laziness on your part.

When you first arrived here your posts where in good, readable, intelligent English but since then you've turned lazy with your typing.

I challenge you to go for 48 hours typing in proper English and not your version of txt speak.

Will you rise to the challenge? :)

No Richard because I am not writing a story or a essay. This is posts in a chat room. It's another.

RichardB
15-11-2012, 14:21
No Richard because I am not writing a story or a essay. This is posts in a chat room. It's another.

This is not a chat room. It is a publicly accessible forum. The whole world can see and read what you write unlike in a chat room where the person has to be invited to join.

Forums are not chat rooms. This forum is for English speaking expats and Russians who want to communicate in English - as proper English as is possible. You do everyone here a disservice by not showing them some common courtesy and do the same.

Jas
15-11-2012, 14:24
I agree with Richard. You go around "teaching" people English, but are unwilling or unable to produce good English yourself. I couldn't recommend anybody to turn to you for grammar advice. It would destroy my reputation. When you produce the King's English, if not Noah Webster's, the standard conventions that enable us to speak intelligently to one another, then I'll talk differently.
"told Pakistan"
"wud"
U, c, "ureself"

You may be a native speaker; I have not ruled out the fat man in Arizona, but you certainly cannot pass as a well-educated one, ahistorical fantasy novel ideas notwithstanding.

Er, I don't teach English- I give help when people ask me for help.
My grammar advice is great and everyone can c that at least.
It's called texting. We talked about it already.
Next?
I am a native speaker. Full stop.
A fat man in Arizona... I wud luv to be that cos I wud have money maybe, a car, and wud be free also. No problem.
Next?
I am very well educated if u bothered to read my posts most of which detect the incredible irony-hypocrisy in 99% of the stuff what u write.

Jas
15-11-2012, 14:26
This is not a chat room. It is a publicly accessible forum. The whole world can see and read what you write unlike in a chat room where the person has to be invited to join.

Forums are not chat rooms. This forum is for English speaking expats and Russians who want to communicate in English - as proper English as is possible. You do everyone here a disservice by not showing them some common courtesy and do the same.

Stop trolling me again or u will be in big trouble.

Judge
15-11-2012, 14:44
Next question please!!!

Richard, I suggest you brush up on present perfect/past perfect .... Russians just love learning these perfect ones..

brush up

''to improve one's knowledge of something or one's ability to do something.''

Good luck..

mrzuzzo
15-11-2012, 14:48
I wud say most normal people in the UK do what I do, just go in a chat room and u will c for ureself. Maybe ure not a native speaker and don't know even how people chat in real life?

Most normal people in the UK do what you do? How come you're only person from the UK that writes like this then?

Jas, I am very much a native speaker and I am real, many people on these forums know me personally and can attest to that.

Jas, please explain to me why you replace the word "my" with "me". It just doesn't make any sense - grammatical or time-wise.

I do "chat" with friends on Skype and Facebook, including Brits, and none of them ever talk like Jas does. It's a paradox!

RichardB
15-11-2012, 14:51
Next question please!!!

Richard, I suggest you brush up on present perfect/past perfect .... Russians just love learning these perfect ones..

brush up

''to improve one's knowledge of something or one's ability to do something.''

Good luck..

Doing that sir!

Interview with bkcih is tomorrow.... *eek*

Judge
15-11-2012, 15:17
Stop trolling me again or u will be in big trouble.

It's not trolling, it's a fair enough comment.
anyways,lets try and keep on thread,which is helping Richard with grammar.
:uk:

Jas
15-11-2012, 16:32
Most normal people in the UK do what you do? How come you're only person from the UK that writes like this then?

Jas, I am very much a native speaker and I am real, many people on these forums know me personally and can attest to that.

Jas, please explain to me why you replace the word "my" with "me". It just doesn't make any sense - grammatical or time-wise.

I do "chat" with friends on Skype and Facebook, including Brits, and none of them ever talk like Jas does. It's a paradox!


Er, line 2 needs the defining article before only person.
Another paradox.
Tehe.

Jas
15-11-2012, 16:38
Next question please!!!

Richard, I suggest you brush up on present perfect/past perfect .... Russians just love learning these perfect ones..

brush up

''to improve one's knowledge of something or one's ability to do something.''

Good luck..


This is present perfect:
a) Stuff what u done in ure life thats cool
b) How long u been something
c) When u give a reason for something that's infront of ure eyes

U got to use auxiliyary verb have\has + V3.

Next?
This is just past perfect. It is auxiliyary verb had + V3 also. This is for when u want to give someone a reason just.

All this is is IELTS level 3 and it's kids stuff actually.

Jack17
15-11-2012, 17:53
I went to university in Liverpool- but I am actually from another part of the UK entirely. Where that is exactly, is my business thanks. I don't speak scouse and I don't have a Liverpool accent either- but I do regard it as me adopted city.
Alright Jas, we've established that Liverpool is ye adopted city and you don't speak Scouse.

Whatever English dialect you're writing, I enjoy it; moreover, it has the added value of annoying Ouzzo and Rus, so I say, keep at it.

rusmeister
15-11-2012, 17:56
This is interesting, what reputation do you think you have rus? or were you not refering to this site, because on the site I would say you are the absolute opposite of jas, where she uses 1 word when 3 would be better you use 333 :)

We're talking about grammar now, mds. Compare mine to Jas's.
If you don't see the difference, then you don't know grammar.

Regarding reputation, I meant anyone who I referred to Jas who then began talking about "me English lessons" and "ure homework". Upon discovering they had been taught wrong, they would slander me as well as Jas. A person who purports to be a teacher of a thing ought to set a good example.

mds45
15-11-2012, 17:57
We're talking about grammar now, mds. Compare mine to Jas's.
If you don't see the difference, then you don't know grammar.

Regarding reputation, I meant anyone who I referred to Jas who then began talking about "me English lessons" and "ure homework". A person who purports to be a teacher of a thing ought to set a good example.

I know I was just havig a bit of fun with Ya :)

Jas
16-11-2012, 19:41
We're talking about grammar now, mds. Compare mine to Jas's.
If you don't see the difference, then you don't know grammar.

Regarding reputation, I meant anyone who I referred to Jas who then began talking about "me English lessons" and "ure homework". Upon discovering they had been taught wrong, they would slander me as well as Jas. A person who purports to be a teacher of a thing ought to set a good example.

Where did I ever tell I purport to be a teacher? I am not a teacher cos I know I can't make it as one. I don't have the personality for it cos I get irritable easy and wud throw a book at them or something.
Er, check my grammar and u will c that I know all the RULES back to front and double in between thanks.

AstarD
16-11-2012, 20:08
You know them alright. You just don't follow them.

Jas
16-11-2012, 21:04
You know them alright. You just don't follow them.

Er, at least I learned them though.

Periwinkle
16-11-2012, 22:30
Er, at least I learned them though.

I am guessing here but think you learned them so you could pass your Ilets exam and go to a UK university. The rules are essential for non native speakers, not as important for someone who knows how to speak without thinking of the rules of grammar.
BTW I am not bothered by your slangy speech and I think if you did want to teach you could speak correctly. As you do not and do not plan to, all the fuss over your language ability is beside the point.
I think anyone who dose not like how Jas speaks should put her on ignore, problem solved.

Jas
18-11-2012, 14:29
I am guessing here but think you learned them so you could pass your Ilets exam and go to a UK university. The rules are essential for non native speakers, not as important for someone who knows how to speak without thinking of the rules of grammar.
BTW I am not bothered by your slangy speech and I think if you did want to teach you could speak correctly. As you do not and do not plan to, all the fuss over your language ability is beside the point.
I think anyone who dose not like how Jas speaks should put her on ignore, problem solved.

No this is totally wrong cos I am a native speaker and shud not have had to do IELTS. When I went to the British Council in Karachi they told like
this,"How come they're making u do IELTS when u got a British passport."
I replied, "It's UCAS."
Everyone told like this, "It's ridicuolous to make someone who is British and a native like Jas do IELTS."
But the official reason was cos I went to PIS and not to a UK secondary school. Discrimination in other words. Anyhow, I got IELTS 9.0 so it was worth it in the end just to prove myself.

rusmeister
18-11-2012, 15:47
I am guessing here but think you learned them so you could pass your Ilets exam and go to a UK university. The rules are essential for non native speakers, not as important for someone who knows how to speak without thinking of the rules of grammar.
BTW I am not bothered by your slangy speech and I think if you did want to teach you could speak correctly. As you do not and do not plan to, all the fuss over your language ability is beside the point.
I think anyone who dose not like how Jas speaks should put her on ignore, problem solved.

Well, it's rather like reading Popeye the Sailor or Long John Silver. The silliness arises from Popeye engaging in intellectual argument. It's worse than Yoda, for at least Yoda or Mr Miyagi can manage to sound wise despite their speech.
The effect sounds like this:
"Hey!! Ure making fun of me English! I shud not have to prove I'm intelligent cos I got an IELTS score, I said you many times, and so know better than u!" (actual errors used)

It's not just slangy. It's not even native, whether by deliberate pretense or by genuinely not knowing good English. "They told like this..." is active error, that of a foreigner who doesn't know the difference between "say" and "tell". Anybody can make a typo. But this goes way beyond typos.

There's no problem with a person writing English poorly, until they claim that they know it well. They cannot be believed, and it puts all their other claims of academic knowledge under suspicion. Literacy precedes academic knowledge. If you can't master literacy, then your ability to master higher academic knowledge becomes quite doubtful.

MickeyTong
19-11-2012, 22:17
A person who purports to be a teacher of a thing ought to set a good example.

Where is Bels? He wood shew us what a notive englsh teatcher can do. OH YES!

ezik
19-11-2012, 22:33
Cood qestuin.:AngelPray:


Where is Bels? He wood shew us what a notive englsh teatcher can do. OH YES!

Jack17
19-11-2012, 23:42
Well, it's rather like reading Popeye the Sailor or Long John Silver. The silliness arises from Popeye engaging in intellectual argument. It's worse than Yoda, for at least Yoda or Mr Miyagi can manage to sound wise despite their speech.
The effect sounds like this:
"Hey!! Ure making fun of me English! I shud not have to prove I'm intelligent cos I got an IELTS score, I said you many times, and so know better than u!" (actual errors used)

It's not just slangy. It's not even native, whether by deliberate pretense or by genuinely not knowing good English. "They told like this..." is active error, that of a foreigner who doesn't know the difference between "say" and "tell". Anybody can make a typo. But this goes way beyond typos.

There's no problem with a person writing English poorly, until they claim that they know it well. They cannot be believed, and it puts all their other claims of academic knowledge under suspicion. Literacy precedes academic knowledge. If you can't master literacy, then your ability to master higher academic knowledge becomes quite doubtful.
Ne contredites jamais la dame.

Jas
20-11-2012, 10:06
Well, it's rather like reading Popeye the Sailor or Long John Silver. The silliness arises from Popeye engaging in intellectual argument. It's worse than Yoda, for at least Yoda or Mr Miyagi can manage to sound wise despite their speech.
The effect sounds like this:
"Hey!! Ure making fun of me English! I shud not have to prove I'm intelligent cos I got an IELTS score, I said you many times, and so know better than u!" (actual errors used)

It's not just slangy. It's not even native, whether by deliberate pretense or by genuinely not knowing good English. "They told like this..." is active error, that of a foreigner who doesn't know the difference between "say" and "tell". Anybody can make a typo. But this goes way beyond typos.

There's no problem with a person writing English poorly, until they claim that they know it well. They cannot be believed, and it puts all their other claims of academic knowledge under suspicion. Literacy precedes academic knowledge. If you can't master literacy, then your ability to master higher academic knowledge becomes quite doubtful.

If I don't engage in intellectual argument then it's ok, yeah?
Er, is that cos everytime I engaged in intellectual stuff with u- I buried u? Don't flatter ureself by covering the fact that I'm routinely able to beat u in any discussion by then crying foul and winging I must be really a phd holding guy in disguise. Believe me, any person who is politically aware can trash all ure agruments in five minutes flat. I can. I trashed Islamists a zillion times and I just adapt my arguments a bit to take u down.
Rus, u wudn't last five minutes in the Pakistani blogosphere and any Pakistani atheist-apostate wud shoot u down in flames.
Go and visit the Council of Ex Muslims and c how long it takes for Maryam to wipe out ure agruments.

rusmeister
20-11-2012, 11:25
If I don't engage in intellectual argument then it's ok, yeah?
Er, is that cos everytime I engaged in intellectual stuff with u- I buried u? Don't flatter ureself by covering the fact that I'm routinely able to beat u in any discussion by then crying foul and winging I must be really a phd holding guy in disguise. Believe me, any person who is politically aware can trash all ure agruments in five minutes flat. I can. I trashed Islamists a zillion times and I just adapt my arguments a bit to take u down.
Rus, u wudn't last five minutes in the Pakistani blogosphere and any Pakistani atheist-apostate wud shoot u down in flames.
Go and visit the Council of Ex Muslims and c how long it takes for Maryam to wipe out ure agruments.

I won't waste time making assertions of "burying", "shooting down", "wiping out", etc with people who disagree with me. I'll let the general public decide for themselves who beat who.

I'm just saying that you stand a much better chance of convincing people who are either disagree with what you think to be true or are not sure of where they stand if you demonstrate your education by showing that you know basic literacy.

Jas
20-11-2012, 12:58
I won't waste time making assertions of "burying", "shooting down", "wiping out", etc with people who disagree with me. I'll let the general public decide for themselves who beat who.

I'm just saying that you stand a much better chance of convincing people who are either disagree with what you think to be true or are not sure of where they stand if you demonstrate your education by showing that you know basic literacy.

If u and me was in apub I cud convert u to being atehist in ten minutes flat.

Jas
20-11-2012, 13:25
I'm just saying that you stand a much better chance of convincing people who are either disagree with what you think to be true or are not sure of where they stand if you demonstrate your education by showing that you know basic literacy.

Er, u cant put are before disagree cos it's 2 verbs.
Snigger.
Pot-kettle-black.

rusmeister
20-11-2012, 14:07
Er, u cant put are before disagree cos it's 2 verbs.
Snigger.
Pot-kettle-black.
:)
Good luck finding a half-dozen actual mistakes in my posts (as opposed to typos, which are especially a problem on virtual keyboards).

As to converting me to atheism, good luck! (Luck itself being an atheist concept, a religion substitute for the materialist). I have no illusions about being able to break through other people's conceptions. No one can be converted to anything until they are in a place where what they have hitherto believed no longer works, has becoming unconvincing for them.

Jack17
20-11-2012, 14:39
No one can be converted to anything until they are in a place where what they have hitherto believed no longer works,

That's the beautiful thing about Stoicism - it always works, if you're stoic.

Jas
20-11-2012, 14:49
That's the beautiful thing about Stoicism - it always works, if you're stoic.

He hates it when it's me who beats him in arguments. If it was anyone else he wud accept it- but cos its me it really freaks him out and stuff.

Jack17
20-11-2012, 15:03
Jas, you beat everyone's argument because you're completely yourself.