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Arthuro
12-10-2012, 18:54
I have a baby, 2 months old. Both parents are Russian...
The idea is to somehow develop foreign language skills in this very period of life.

Certainly my daughter is too young to have a lesson or a full day with a native speaker
It doesn't make sense. As I heard this can be started when she's at least 1 yr old.

So what can we do at the moment? Any music, recorded speech during strolling for example? Or smth else?

Should we restrict with one foreign language or it's possible for 2,3 - how many?
To avoid any mess in newborn's brain

I would be grateful for any advice.

Kartoshka
13-10-2012, 00:15
Music (children's songs) is a nice idea; you could also read stories in a foreign language, and recite simple rhymes and finger plays. However, at this age you don't really need to worry about doing anything more than simply exposing the child to a variety of different sounds.

A young child's brain is very receptive to language, and has the capacity to learn multiple languages. For example, a child with a Russian mother, French father, German grandparents, and English nanny would be able to understand and, after some time and regular exposure to each language, speak all four languages. Regular exposure to personal, meaningful dialogue is the key to successful language learning.

bob-b-d
15-10-2012, 22:57
I think you can wait a year or so and it'll be fine (as far as finding a teacher) or just let the child hear stories or something in English

Arthuro
16-10-2012, 23:00
So it's good to find a native teacher\nanny after 1 year..

Now - just hear some music, stories, rhymes
How many languages simultaneously? 1? 2?

Does anyone know where i could download these (for free of course))))

Many thanks

cheriedeperth
16-10-2012, 23:33
I have a baby, 2 months old. Both parents are Russian...
The idea is to somehow develop foreign language skills in this very period of life.

Certainly my daughter is too young to have a lesson or a full day with a native speaker
It doesn't make sense. As I heard this can be started when she's at least 1 yr old.

So what can we do at the moment? Any music, recorded speech during strolling for example? Or smth else?

Should we restrict with one foreign language or it's possible for 2,3 - how many?
To avoid any mess in newborn's brain

I would be grateful for any advice.

I know a couple who had a 5 year old daughter at the time I first met them. The father's native language was French and the Mother's was German. From the day of the child's birth, the father spoke French to the child at all times, and the mother spoke German to the child at all times. When I met the child when she was 5 years old she spoke French to the father and German to the mother, without a problem. She knew what each parent would understand and spoke accordingly. She was less sure about what language to speak with me, though :-)

martpark
17-10-2012, 00:01
So it's good to find a native teacher\nanny after 1 year..

Now - just hear some music, stories, rhymes
How many languages simultaneously? 1? 2?

Does anyone know where i could download these (for free of course))))

Many thanks

As early as possible with all languages. Babies can recogise all sounds in the human spectrum but concentrate on specific phonetics later in development. Her mistakes will be superficial (aka easily corrected) at the beginning and really only the parent will feel 'bad'. If you can associate each language with a specific task/activity, s/he will differentiate each one easier. The child will adapt quickly and with extended exposure should do very well later in life.

Look for apps. Many are free.

A good video on the subject from TED. The Linguistic Genius of Babies

http://www.ted.com/talks/patricia_kuhl_the_linguistic_genius_of_babies.html

Arthuro
17-10-2012, 18:02
I know a couple who had a 5 year old daughter at the time I first met them. The father's native language was French and the Mother's was German. From the day of the child's birth, the father spoke French to the child at all times, and the mother spoke German to the child at all times. When I met the child when she was 5 years old she spoke French to the father and German to the mother, without a problem. She knew what each parent would understand and spoke accordingly. She was less sure about what language to speak with me, though :-)

As I said both parents are Russian and speak Russian, so this has nothing to do with my case.

Arthuro
17-10-2012, 18:03
As early as possible with all languages. Babies can recogise all sounds in the human spectrum but concentrate on specific phonetics later in development. Her mistakes will be superficial (aka easily corrected) at the beginning and really only the parent will feel 'bad'. If you can associate each language with a specific task/activity, s/he will differentiate each one easier. The child will adapt quickly and with extended exposure should do very well later in life.

Look for apps. Many are free.

A good video on the subject from TED. The Linguistic Genius of Babies

http://www.ted.com/talks/patricia_kuhl_the_linguistic_genius_of_babies.html

Thank you!
Will have a look!

Tony P
17-10-2012, 19:11
I have a Niece who, from about 4 years, spoke English, Spanish and Portugese with equal ease and accuracy. This came from an English Father, Portugese Mother and Spanish speaking nanny and household staff.
She kept the languages separate and appropriate for who she talked with - and knew who could understand each other and translated between those who could not.

A Belgium Flemish family I knew with children between about 8 and 12 spoke a different language of five, each day, all day. The danger here is the children will learn their Parents grammar, vocabulary and pronounciation faults, however slight, in other than their 'first' language.

Learning at least in part from a Native speaker helps avoids this danger - subject to the 'brand' of the native language desired and being careful to chose not just the English* speaking country of origin but also which region of that country !

*if the target language is English, but the same applies for many other languages

Kartoshka
17-10-2012, 21:30
Now - just hear some music, stories, rhymes
How many languages simultaneously? 1? 2?

Does anyone know where i could download these (for free of course))))

Just for listening to the sounds of different languages (which is what she will be doing at this age) - it doesn't matter how many. One, two, two hundred.

Actually learning a language - she will be learning Russian from her parents, and as for how many more, it depends on your finances to employ native speakers to spend time with her. Obviously the more time spent on each language, the better and quicker she will pick it up. But technically you could employ a different nanny for each day of the week, each one speaking a different language, and your daughter would learn to communicate with each one; but progress would be very slow.

A good free resource for different languages is YouTube.

rubyrussia
17-10-2012, 21:33
Children up to five have an incredible ability to learn languages. Does that mean you should take advantage of this time period? My experience says: probably not. Why? Well, the overwhelming majority of people who get English lessons for their child of say less than 5 years are wasting their money. Children learn language differently than adults do... that's obvious. I've met Russian orphans who lived eight or nine years in Russia, moved to America and eventually became very poor Russian speakers.

Children need constant interaction and development. Most people can't afford to pay the crazy high Moscow price for English lessons. They might need lessons to help learn how to read and write later like a native speaker. I get offers all the time for one hour a week, two times a day because a family can't afford anything more. My advice? Focus on teaching the child Russian first. Feed a child's curiosity. There is so much more out there than foreign languages. If you want your kid to get language practice, there are tons of expats who have their children playing sports on the weekend that I think is affiliated with the Anglo American School. Help them make a friend. Get the children doing something fun, rather than you trying to give them a hobby they didn't ask for. They will resent it later on.

Anyway, bottom line. If the contact hours aren't significant, you're probably just waiting your money.

Good luck.

rubyrussia
17-10-2012, 21:34
Just for listening to the sounds of different languages (which is what she will be doing at this age) - it doesn't matter how many. One, two, two hundred.

Actually learning a language - she will be learning Russian from her parents, and as for how many more, it depends on your finances to employ native speakers to spend time with her. Obviously the more time spent on each language, the better and quicker she will pick it up. But technically you could employ a different nanny for each day of the week, each one speaking a different language, and your daughter would learn to communicate with each one; but progress would be very slow.

A good free resource for different languages is YouTube.

You recommend the child listening or watching youtube? :idea: That's a new one. ;)

cheriedeperth
17-10-2012, 23:13
As I said both parents are Russian and speak Russian, so this has nothing to do with my case.

In your opening post you said that you wanted to avoid any mess in a newborn's brain - I thought my post was a beautiful example of what children are able to cope with language-wise. Sorry you didn't find it useful or interesting.

Arthuro
18-10-2012, 19:40
Learning at least in part from a Native speaker helps avoids this danger - subject to the 'brand' of the native language desired and being careful to chose not just the English* speaking country of origin but also which region of that country !

*if the target language is English, but the same applies for many other languages

Yes, it's an important thing.
Thanks

Arthuro
18-10-2012, 19:43
Actually learning a language - she will be learning Russian from her parents, and as for how many more, it depends on your finances to employ native speakers to spend time with her. Obviously the more time spent on each language, the better and quicker she will pick it up. But technically you could employ a different nanny for each day of the week, each one speaking a different language, and your daughter would learn to communicate with each one; but progress would be very slow.


Yes, but what's the optimum in terms of speed\amount.
I think 2 or 3 apart from Russian, but 2 or 3?
And with a simultaneous starting period or not

Yes, this also depends on finance since we're are far from being oligarchs..
So from what age does it make sense.. I heard from appr 1 year old - is it close to the truth?

Arthuro
18-10-2012, 19:48
Children need constant interaction and development. Most people can't afford to pay the crazy high Moscow price for English lessons. They might need lessons to help learn how to read and write later like a native speaker. I get offers all the time for one hour a week, two times a day because a family can't afford anything more. My advice? Focus on teaching the child Russian first. Feed a child's curiosity. There is so much more out there than foreign languages. If you want your kid to get language practice, there are tons of expats who have their children playing sports on the weekend that I think is affiliated with the Anglo American School. Help them make a friend. Get the children doing something fun, rather than you trying to give them a hobby they didn't ask for. They will resent it later on.

Anyway, bottom line. If the contact hours aren't significant, you're probably just waiting your money.

Good luck.

At this moment we're not going to find a native speaker.
This is what we could do 1-2yr later

What I'm talking is what we could do know for free to help her somehow in the future.

Moreover I have never mentioned English.. that could be the choice, but it's not decided yet.

Arthuro
18-10-2012, 19:50
In your opening post you said that you wanted to avoid any mess in a newborn's brain - I thought my post was a beautiful example of what children are able to cope with language-wise. Sorry you didn't find it useful or interesting.

In bilingual family it comes without saying - children usually speak both languages.
Rather easy task for parents. Just speak only you native language

rubyrussia
18-10-2012, 20:41
At this moment we're not going to find a native speaker.
This is what we could do 1-2yr later

What I'm talking is what we could do know for free to help her somehow in the future.

Moreover I have never mentioned English.. that could be the choice, but it's not decided yet.

Now, you're just dancing... so you're considering French? Spanish? Swahili? :confused: Why?

How about Esperanto? :thumbsup:

Arthuro
19-10-2012, 00:28
Now, you're just dancing... so you're considering French? Spanish? Swahili? :confused: Why?

How about Esperanto? :thumbsup:

Yes. we're considering German, French and Spanish apart from English.
Or may be 2 of them English\German and French\Spanish
Since the girl will anyway study English in her future life (kindergarten. school, university), and there will be less attention to 2nd or (may be) 3rd language