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RichardB
08-10-2012, 11:11
When opening a book at a certain page is it:

Open at page 23 or

Open on page 23

?

I think it should be at but she thinks it should be on.

RichardB
08-10-2012, 11:29
Answer found:

"open at" is British English. "open to" is American English". I'm British therefore I say "open at page".

"open on" is not really acceptable in either language apparently.

PeteD
08-10-2012, 11:42
Interesting!

I would have said "Open the book on page 23 at the third paragraph"

RichardB
08-10-2012, 12:01
If you weren't specifying a location (ie paragraph 3) would you then use on or at?

PeteD
08-10-2012, 12:07
My gut instinct would still be to say on.

If I was marking an IELTS paper, I would not penalise anyone for using either form!

PeteD
08-10-2012, 12:08
.... but I would never use open to!

rubyrussia
08-10-2012, 13:28
I use open to.

Hey Richard, you're doing CELTA, right? I'd love to hear your opinion when you've finished.

RichardB
08-10-2012, 13:48
I use open to.

Hey Richard, you're doing CELTA, right? I'd love to hear your opinion when you've finished.

Yep, I'll be doing it here (http://www.bkcih-moscow.com/training_n/celta) starting in mid January. :D

GalinaP
08-10-2012, 13:55
I'm a CELTA product, and 'open at' is what I use

GalinaP
08-10-2012, 13:58
Or, as New English File tells its students, 'Open your books and go to page ...'

rubyrussia
08-10-2012, 14:10
That's where I did mine. I thought the quality of the course was very good. Wasn't happy that the course in Moscow was considerably more expensive than anywhere else.

RichardB
08-10-2012, 14:18
That's where I did mine. I thought the quality of the course was very good. Wasn't happy that the course in Moscow was considerably more expensive than anywhere else.

Good to hear the recommendation RR.

The price difference between here and the UK schools I've looked at is 'only' 250. Not that much really in the grand scheme of things.

Did they offer you work after passing the course?

rubyrussia
08-10-2012, 14:57
In my opinion, even the people that didn't seem to be very promising teachers were offered jobs if they were positive, smiled a lot, and seemed enthusiastic. In fact, if you can smile, be positive, and let your students talk, I would say just about any school would hire you in Russia.

BKC doesn't offer a very competitive salary. I think EF offers 60,000 now. BKC is still at 30,000 or something like that. Yes, they offered me a job.

rubyrussia
08-10-2012, 15:00
One more thing, I recommend you learn the tenses in English and how and why they are used before you take the class. Also, if you can get some practice in a classroom before, that might help too.

RichardB
08-10-2012, 18:53
One more thing, I recommend you learn the tenses in English and how and why they are used before you take the class. Also, if you can get some practice in a classroom before, that might help too.

I'll note that!

Can you remember what the recommended text books are?

swansong
08-10-2012, 18:59
Celta slip here too. Been sayin' 'at' since Oxford/Cambridge materials have broken me. 'To' is by far the most correct, as an American and a gentleman. 'Merica. Fcuk ya.

celia
08-10-2012, 21:17
On the subject of salaries, I don't know anything about EF salaries but BKC's salary is 30,000 roubles and a shared flat..

rubyrussia
08-10-2012, 22:14
I'll note that!

Can you remember what the recommended text books are?

There are some theory books but I wouldn't spend your time on that before the course because most of it won't really stick unless you put it into practice.

EF offers 60,000; flat not included. I have a friend who just signed on. They did help her find one btw and she shares it with someone else who works at EF.

celia
09-10-2012, 13:09
I recommend buying both Murphy grammar books (available in any bookshop in Moscow) - the dark blue one is intermediate and upper intermediate (one page shows you the grammar construction and then there's a corresponding page with exercises) - the second, red, book is elementary level - it's invaluable for breaking down basic grammar in logical, easy to understand chunks.

Apart from those I like Swan's Practical English Usage.

I agree with Rubyrussia - buy the grammar books before the course - you'll probably buy them after the course anyway.

Jas
09-10-2012, 13:16
EF offers 60,000; flat not included. .

That's a nothing salary that is.

RichardB
09-10-2012, 13:57
RichardB.... last week's company director- today's English teacher on 30,000 roubles.
Tehe.

Jas.... last weeks semi-illiterate self centred egotistical muppet - todays semi-illiterate self centred egotistical muppet

Nothing changes does it?

PS It's todays, not today's

scd167
09-10-2012, 17:32
Jas.... last weeks semi-illiterate self centred egotistical muppet - todays semi-illiterate self centred egotistical muppet

Nothing changes does it?

PS It's todays, not today's

Richard, I think you found your first student... would be like teaching Helen Keller me thinks and stuff... actually, although she was blind and deaf, Helen Keller was much more literate than Jas?

:boxing:

rubyrussia
09-10-2012, 17:38
That's a nothing salary that is.

Well, I guess it's not great but for legal work with a visa, I can't think of higher offers on the market. That doesn't mean it's a good deal however.

Jas, I take it you make a lot more than that? What do you do?

scd167
09-10-2012, 17:40
Well, I guess it's not great but for legal work with a visa, I can't think of higher offers on the market. That doesn't mean it's a good deal however.

Jas, I take it you make a lot more than that? What do you do?

Based upon her previous posts, she is unemployed and lives on a 20,000 ruble allowance from her mom... true genius.

:10241:

andymackem
09-10-2012, 18:13
I am a novelist with a strong background in the resturant business. Self employed in Kazan doing my henna business I will earn 70,000 roubles a month thanks.

How many published works? What sort of income does that generate? I'm curious - after years in journalism I'm increasingly tempted to try my hand at writing a novel, but I don't know if it would be worth my time.

andymackem
09-10-2012, 18:19
As for CELTA, I did one in London ages ago. Didn't find it too difficult, but I'd only see teaching as a fall-back option when settling into a new country. Worked at BKC for a bit - the money is poor, but when first arriving in Russia it was useful to have someone who sorted out accommodation and visas for me.

Trouble is, these days, it seems almost impossible to get a well-paid teaching gig (outside of teaching / nannying / child-minding, which wouldn't suit me at all - I lack the patience for kids). When it was easier to freelance things were a bit different, but I sense that now a lot of those opportunities only exist if you've got TRP or some other long-term means of staying in Russia without relying on an employer to get you a visa. So the schools exploit this (to be honest, I don't know if there's a huge difference between 60,000 minus rent or 30,000 rent-free). You won't starve, but I'd treat it as a way of getting established in Moscow and getting the contacts in the industry that you actually _want_ to work in. (unless, of course, you're passionate about teaching - in which case, best of luck, and I assume you're already aware of the financial issues aroudn this).

okiey
09-10-2012, 19:35
At the weekend or on the weekend?

My natural instinct is to say at the weekend. What did you do at the weekend.

However, I have heard people here in Moscow say on the weekend.

andymackem
09-10-2012, 20:10
At the weekend or on the weekend?

My natural instinct is to say at the weekend. What did you do at the weekend.

However, I have heard people here in Moscow say on the weekend.

At = UK
On = US

Or so I've always understood.

Judge
09-10-2012, 21:28
off topic posts deleted,Jas,you ask others to respect your threads , I think you should do the same .
Lets try and keep on topic.at least in this section of the forum.

Good luck with CELTA Richard...

RichardB
09-10-2012, 22:22
On the subject of salaries, I don't know anything about EF salaries but BKC's salary is 30,000 roubles and a shared flat..

Salary isn't an issue as I have my company salary too. 30,000 rubles would be pocket money :)



There are some theory books but I wouldn't spend your time on that before the course because most of it won't really stick unless you put it into practice.

EF offers 60,000; flat not included. I have a friend who just signed on. They did help her find one btw and she shares it with someone else who works at EF.


I think I'll ask some of the local language schools if they would let me sit in on the classes.



I recommend buying both Murphy grammar books (available in any bookshop in Moscow) - the dark blue one is intermediate and upper intermediate (one page shows you the grammar construction and then there's a corresponding page with exercises) - the second, red, book is elementary level - it's invaluable for breaking down basic grammar in logical, easy to understand chunks.

Apart from those I like Swan's Practical English Usage.

I agree with Rubyrussia - buy the grammar books before the course - you'll probably buy them after the course anyway.

Thanks Celia (and RR)



Richard, I think you found your first student... would be like teaching Helen Keller me thinks and stuff... actually, although she was blind and deaf, Helen Keller was much more literate than Jas?

:boxing:

Give me strength...... :7525:



Well, I guess it's not great but for legal work with a visa, I can't think of higher offers on the market. That doesn't mean it's a good deal however.

Jas, I take it you make a lot more than that? What do you do?

Unemployed / unemployable as she is here on a private visa.



At the weekend or on the weekend?

My natural instinct is to say at the weekend. What did you do at the weekend.

However, I have heard people here in Moscow say on the weekend.

I'd say at the weekend but being from the UK that seems
to be the correct wording (see andymackems reply below)



At = UK
On = US

Or so I've always understood.

RichardB
09-10-2012, 22:23
Good luck with CELTA Richard...

Thanks Judge.

I'll be asking a lot more questions over the couple of months :)

Jas
10-10-2012, 12:48
How many published works? What sort of income does that generate? I'm curious - after years in journalism I'm increasingly tempted to try my hand at writing a novel, but I don't know if it would be worth my time.

Hi, pop over to Jas Chat and I will give u all the help u want with novel stuff.