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GalinaP
01-10-2012, 14:09
Dear Expats,

How do you personally define the difference between a money-saver and a cheapskate?

Jas
01-10-2012, 14:23
Dear Expats,

How do you personally define the difference between a money-saver and a cheapskate?

A cheapskate expects u to buy when she-he doesn't. A money-saver just doesn't buy at all and doesn't want anything bought for her-him even.

GalinaP
01-10-2012, 14:29
Thanks Jas, that covers it nicely. Is there any hope for cheapskates of this world then?

Korotky Gennady
01-10-2012, 14:32
Thanks Jas, that covers it nicely. Is there any hope for cheapskates of this world then?

What thing do you want? :bomb:

GalinaP
01-10-2012, 14:34
I'm speaking about the room for personality improvement in this area.

martpark
01-10-2012, 14:35
Dear Expats,

How do you personally define the difference between a money-saver and a cheapskate?

A cheapskate doesn't like paying and a money-saver, aka a frugal person, doesn't like buying.

GalinaP
01-10-2012, 14:42
A cheapskate doesn't like paying and a money-saver, aka a frugal person, doesn't like buying.

Looks like you people are fully capable of taking a firm stand on this one. Is being a cheapskate an ultimate turn-off for you?

martpark
01-10-2012, 14:58
Looks like you people are fully capable of taking a firm stand on this one. Is being a cheapskate an ultimate turn-off for you?

Cheapskate has a negative connotation and frugal is considered positive, ie people wise with their money, but, could be used to describe the same person depending on perspective.

scd167
01-10-2012, 15:24
Cheapskate has a negative connotation and frugal is considered positive, ie people wise with their money, but, could be used to describe the same person depending on perspective.

Hmm, the cheapskate sees himself as frugal? Most I have known (and quickly unknow them once I realize they are a true cheapskate) see being a cheapskate as a quest to take whatever they can from others and they derive great pleasures in such conquests.

As an example, we had a group of five of us working together here and hanging out outside of work when I first arrived and would take turns "treating" to lunch or drinks. That group became four after about a month when one of the guys seemed to either have forgotten his wallet, etc. everytime it came around to his turn to buy.

Being frugal is great, when you find a good deal on something and save some money, being a cheapskate is self-centered and pretty much a fatal character flaw in my book... but, I really don't have a strong position on most things.

:11033:

martpark
01-10-2012, 15:50
Hmm, the cheapskate sees himself as frugal? Most I have known (and quickly unknow them once I realize they are a true cheapskate) see being a cheapskate as a quest to take whatever they can from others and they derive great pleasures in such conquests.

As an example, we had a group of five of us working together here and hanging out outside of work when I first arrived and would take turns "treating" to lunch or drinks. That group became four after about a month when one of the guys seemed to either have forgotten his wallet, etc. everytime it came around to his turn to buy.

Being frugal is great, when you find a good deal on something and save some money, being a cheapskate is self-centered and pretty much a fatal character flaw in my book... but, I really don't have a strong position on most things.

:11033:

The first example I'd call a sponge.

The second could be called either 'sponge', absorbs off others or 'cheapskate' doesn't like to open the wallet.

Some people think they are frugal when others think they are actually cheapskates.

For Galina: A 'miser = 'cheapskates' perhaps more formally. Penny-pincher is another.

TolkoRaz
01-10-2012, 15:54
As an example, we had a group of five of us working together here and hanging out outside of work when I first arrived and would take turns "treating" to lunch or drinks. That group became four after about a month when one of the guys seemed to either have forgotten his wallet, etc. everytime it came around to his turn to buy.

:11033:

Was he Scottish? ;) I hear that when they are not wearing kilts, they have very deep pockets and wallets full of Moths! ;)

andymackem
02-10-2012, 15:55
It's fairly simple. I'm sensibly careful with my money - a good thing. He's a cheapskate (skinflint, stingy bugger etc) - a bad thing.

More seriously, a saver is probably concerned about getting value for money - when it's appropriate to spend, the saver will spend, especially if paying more now is likely to save money in the longer run (eg buying more expensive but higher quality shoes means no need to replace them right away because they fall apart).

A cheapskate is probably concerned exclusively with parting with the smallest amount of cash and will therefore choose the cheapest possible option without considering the future consequences (eg buys the cheapest avaialble shoes, even though they'll need replacing within a few weeks).

The saver is also more likely to factor in other things: a flight at 4am is $100 cheaper, but if the cab to the airport costs $70, is the disrupted sleep worth $30? The cheapskate will book the flight, take the last Aeroexpress to DME, and spend several miserable hours sitting on his luggage waiting to check in. Having done both, I'm going on holiday with saver next time :lol: