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TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 18:12
An Arabic friend of mine (yes, a Muslim) has asked me what is the difference in meaning between 'Outlook' and 'Uplook'.

Sadly, my English is not good enough to explain - can anybody help explain the differences? :book:

In advance, many thanks for your time and consideration :)

PeteD
30-09-2012, 18:21
frequency of use, for a start!

I have never heard "uplook" used, even though it exists - I just looked it up. It means "to look up(wards)"

Outlook, is much more commonly used, and means a forecast, or projection.... The OED defines it as



"outlook ˈaʊtlʊk ♫ noun. m17.
1 A place from which a person may look out or keep watch. m17.
2
a A mental attitude or point of view. m18.
b A view or prospect from a place or point. e19.
c The prospect for the future. m19.
a Guardian Happy integrated children with a positive outlook on life.b C. Kingsley The dreary outlook of chimney-tops and smoke.c Field It is not only in residential housing that the outlook is bleak.
3 The act or practice of looking out. e19.
on the outlook on the lookout.

ORIGIN: from out- + look noun.
outlook aʊtˈlʊk verb. l16.
1 verb trans. Disconcert by looking; stare down; outstare. l16.
2 verb intrans. Look out or forth. rare. e17.
3† verb trans. Outdo in looks or appearance. rare. Only in m18.
ORIGIN: from out- + look verb."

I believe that the use of the term is not restricted to the definition, but more along the lines I suggested!

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 18:24
Thanks, PeteD :)

I see the internet quotes these, but it appears to be Old English or from religious works - I do like the last one though! ;)

“The change from land to water, from narrow and stony streets to the wide, free outlook and uplook of a great river, the varied life of a crowded ferry-boat and of a busy harbor, the magnetic sympathies of a multitude let loose from toil and perforce at a stand-still for the time, -- all this insures a transition of mind as well as transfer of body.” Lippincott's Magazine, November 1885

“Also, at ten years of age, I became a newsboy on the streets of a city, and found myself with a changed uplook.” What Life Means to Me


“Introspection, and retrospection were good for the cloister; but the uplook, the outlook and the onlook are alone worthy the modern Christian.” Work Done for Humanity

“One vision, specially clear and unreasonable, for he had not even been conscious of noting it, was the face of the youth cleaning the gun; its intent, stolid, yet startled uplook at the kitchen doorway, quickly shifted to the girl carrying the cider jug.” Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works

“Any uplook to something beautiful and high and fine above you partakes of the nature of worship.” Our Unitarian Gospel

“She dropped him a courtesy with an uplook and again a vailing of her wicked eyes.” Malcolm

“Indeed, he had with many, although such was the force of his character that no one dared a word to that effect in his hearing, the reputation of being lax in his ideas of what constituted a saving faith; and most of the sect being very narrow minded, if not small hearted, in their limitations of the company fitly partaking of the last supper of our Lord -- requiring proof of intellectual accord with themselves as to the how and why of many things, especially in regard of what they called the plan of salvation, he was generally judged to be misled by the deceitful kindliness of the depraved human heart in requiring as the ground of communion only such an uplook to Jesus as, when on earth, Jesus himself had responded to with healing.” Malcolm

“If the outlook is bad," he would say, "try the 'uplook.”

PeteD
30-09-2012, 18:33
As you say - mainly old quotations, some religious, some not.

It isn't in common use - as I said, I have never heard it.

It's also interesting to note the use of "onlook". The word is also rarely used in this context, relating to the view, but the word "onlooker" is used quite frequently!

rubyrussia
30-09-2012, 18:36
Pete has given you a very good response. I agree.

Tolko, why does it matter that your friend is Muslim? :)

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 18:37
Can an onlooker stand at an outlook? :confused:

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 18:39
Pete has given you a very good response. I agree.

Tolko, why does it matter that your friend is Muslim? :)

It does not, but they are Arabic and asked me as they think I can speak & understand quite good English - The reference to being Muslim was made because some see me as an apologist for Islam! :(

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 18:40
Whoops, Sorry, Just in case you did not 'hear' it the first time! ;)

PeteD
30-09-2012, 18:41
Can an onlooker stand at an outlook? :confused:

Theoretically, yes!

In common use "outlook" is more conceptual.

Nevertheless, the OED defines it slightly differently, so it could also be an actual place and, therefore, can be host to a visitor / witness!

rubyrussia
30-09-2012, 18:41
It does not, but they are Arabic and asked me as they think I can speak & understand quite good English - The reference to being Muslim was made because some see me as an apologist for Islam! :(

Tolko, your written English is very good. I haven't heard you speak, but who cares. Tell your friend that you are Ruby approved. If he has doubts or questions, send him to me. :cool:

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 18:44
Thanks, will do! :)

robertmf
30-09-2012, 19:12
An Arabic friend of mine (yes, a Muslim) has asked me what is the difference in meaning between 'Outlook' and 'Uplook'.

Sadly, my English is not good enough to explain - can anybody help explain the differences? :book:

In advance, many thanks for your time and consideration :)

I wouldn't use "uplook" at all. "Uplook" is at best obscure.

As has been said, "outlook" is a forecast or prognosis. For example, "Today's weather outlook is for sunshine and cooler temperatures" -or- "The outlook for this patient is full recovery".

"Outlook" is also used in the sense of 'good observation point'. For example, "The outlook from Yosemite's Half Dome is magnificent".

Of course, you have to look out for falling off the outlook :bong:



Woman falls off Half Dome (http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2011/08/calif-woman-falls-to-death-from-yosemites-half-dome/1#.UGhfMKo0nVA)

Half Dome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Outlook Peak (http://www.mountain-forecast.com/peaks/Outlook-Peak)

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 19:21
In these high winds, the outlook for falling off the outlook is not very good! :confused1:

English is a bizarre language - but why do the US of A use 'prognosis' and the English use 'forecast' :confused:

Are the US of A trying to be posh by using big and clever sounding words? :book:

natlee
30-09-2012, 19:25
Tolko, your written English is very good. I haven't heard you speak, but who cares. Lucky you! His accent is someplace between Russian, German and English - a horrid mix! :shame: :D

natlee
30-09-2012, 19:26
And I did mean horrible - my English ex didn't teach me anything good! :(

rubyrussia
30-09-2012, 19:29
In these high winds, the outlook for falling off the outlook is not very good! :confused1:

English is a bizarre language - but why do the US of A use 'prognosis' and the English use 'forecast' :confused:

Are the US of A trying to be posh by using big and clever sounding words? :book:

The term prognosis is usually used in medicine. It isn't used in American English to talk about the weather. You might find some exception on the internet or just an anomaly like Robert :10293:, ;) The word should be forecast.

PeteD
30-09-2012, 19:30
In these high winds, the outlook for falling off the outlook is not very good! :confused1:

English is a bizarre language - but why do the US of A use 'prognosis' and the English use 'forecast' :confused:

Are the US of A trying to be posh by using big and clever sounding words? :book:

The English tend to use "prognosis" in relation to a medical condition, following "diagnosis".

Fit for the purpose, as opposed to trying to be posh! ;)

robertmf
30-09-2012, 19:30
In these high winds, the outlook for falling off the outlook is not very good! :confused1:

English is a bizarre language - but why do the US of A use 'prognosis' and the English use 'forecast' :confused:

For the same reason the Brits use the word "biscuit" when they mean cookie :mml:

Here in the US, prognosis is used in health-related, and forecast is used in business and weather.



Are the US of A trying to be posh by using big and clever sounding words? :book:

Yes. Because supercalifragilisticexpialidocious *is* posh :bong:

:)

rubyrussia
30-09-2012, 19:31
And I did mean horrible - my English ex didn't teach me anything good! :(

Life isn't over Natlee. :) You can still find another Brit! (That is, if you want!)

natlee
30-09-2012, 19:34
For the same reason the Brits use the word "biscuit" when they mean cookie :mml: "Jumper" when they mean "sweater", "boot" when they mean "trunk", "whilst" when they mean "while" etc. etc. One word, weirdos!! :D

natlee
30-09-2012, 19:37
Life isn't over Natlee. :) You can still find another Brit! (That is, if you want!) Hmmm, not sure... I do find the English incredibly hot (not necessarily my ex though :shame:) but I've had.. 1.5 poor experiences :shame:

PeteD
30-09-2012, 19:38
One word, weirdos!! :D

Oi!!!!

I resemble that remark!

natlee
30-09-2012, 19:41
Oi!!!!

I resemble that remark! (Wh)oops! :D Ignore me, I'm not particularly happy with the English at the moment ;)

PeteD
30-09-2012, 19:42
(Wh)oops! :D Ignore me, I'm not particularly happy with the English at the moment ;)

So I gathered!

Trust me, we're not all like that! ;)

rubyrussia
30-09-2012, 19:44
Hmmm, not sure... I do find the English incredibly hot (not necessarily my ex though :shame:) but I've had.. 1.5 poor experiences :shame:

Maybe it's just the accent?

All I can say is that British and American women are car wrecks. No offense to any women who are from those places on the forum. It's not just about looks too.

Russia is great. :SwoonLoveSmiley:

natlee
30-09-2012, 19:46
So I gathered! Eeenglish! ;)

natlee
30-09-2012, 19:51
Maybe it's just the accent?

All I can say is that British and American women are car wrecks. No offense to any women who are from those places on the forum. It's not just about looks too.

Russia is great. :SwoonLoveSmiley: No, a bit more than the accent, I'm afraid :shame: and, well, thank you? ;)

Tony P
30-09-2012, 19:52
For the same reason the Brits use the word "biscuit" when they mean cookie

No we don't.

We use the word "biscuit" when we mean biscuit !

Tony P
30-09-2012, 19:57
but I've had.. 1.5 poor experiences

? How does one have half a bad experience ?

Curate's egg ?

natlee
30-09-2012, 20:00
? How does one have half a bad experience ?

Curate's egg ? Something like that ;)

robertmf
30-09-2012, 20:03
? How does one have half a bad experience ?

Curate's egg ?

:drink: The same way the average Russian woman has 1.43 kids :bong:

:mml: List of sovereign states and dependent territories by fertility rate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Benedikt
30-09-2012, 20:04
An Arabic friend of mine (yes, a Muslim) has asked me what is the difference in meaning between 'Outlook' and 'Uplook'.

Sadly, my English is not good enough to explain - can anybody help explain the differences? :book:

In advance, many thanks for your time and consideration :)



http://www.uplook.org/

the way i understand it, it means the looking up the HIM ( whatever name we might use) whenever the outlook ( in our life, our situation,etc) seems to be not to rosy. there is quite a lot to read, but the explanations seem to be good and easy to understand also for someone with a restricted knowledge of the english language.

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 20:04
Lucky you! His accent is someplace between Russian, German and English - a horrid mix! :shame: :D

Hey Natashka, that is not very fair even if it were true! :eek:

It is difficult maintaining good accents when jumping between languages and, as for English, its even harder for Foreigners to master the quaint language as there are sooooooooooo many accents!

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 20:06
"Jumper" when they mean "sweater", "boot" when they mean "trunk", "whilst" when they mean "while" etc. etc. One word, weirdos!! :D

I thought a 'jumper' was a sheep or somebody who committed suicide infront of the metro? :confused:

natlee
30-09-2012, 20:15
Hey Natashka, that is not very fair even if it were true! :eek:

It is difficult maintaining good accents when jumping between languages and, as for English, its even harder for Foreigners to master the quaint language as there are sooooooooooo many accents! Awww but Tolki :p you do realize I'm not actually a native speaker myself ;)

TolkoRaz
30-09-2012, 20:26
OK, understood, I thought as much :10310:

robertmf
30-09-2012, 20:33
Awww but Tolki :p you do realize I'm not actually a native speaker myself ;)

:emote_popcorn: What's the outlook for you two getting together ? :mml: :trampoline:


:fireworks: