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View Full Version : What's the Most Important Event in World History- In your Opinion?



Jas
17-09-2012, 19:47
Ok guys I didn't strut all this way through a city I know nothing about to this sleazy internet cafe ran by gypsies just to joke and play: It's time to get serious and stuff (I keep loseing me way to this internet cafe by the way).

From the time Jibreel ordered the Prophet Muhammad to recite the Holy Qu'ran to the bullet that killed Franz Ferdinand and sparked World War One, we got critical moments in global history- a single ripple in time- like the death of Alexander, or the voyage of Columbus. So what then do you rate as the most important event in world history?


For me it is this: July 20th 1969, when Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the moon. The only thing that compares to that is the discovery of fire 1 million years back.

Jas
17-09-2012, 20:04
This is a thread I really want to put some stuff into cos I love history..... but me sim card won't work here so I got to walk back to the hotel to get a call from me mum.
For those who don't know, I am posting from a street internet cafe and it's a hassle to get here even. I am doing this all just cos I love you!!!
When I get back to Russia things will be normal and stuff.

Guys, in the meantime, I kindly ask u to respect the thread and to add ure thoughts on world history. Thanks in advance and I promise I will read every post tomorrow morning.

franzewich
17-09-2012, 20:28
...(or some so may think) - and, boy, did she screw up!

TolkoRaz
17-09-2012, 20:37
Why is somebody allegedly walking on the moon important to the earth we live on? :confused:

It can't be classed as the 'most important event in World history!' :10310:

martpark
17-09-2012, 21:21
I'll go with Gutenburg's Press with movable type. Allowed millions of people to read and changed the way humans viewed the world.

Lost in moscow
17-09-2012, 21:25
The event that led man to use fire

singhshakti2020
17-09-2012, 21:59
1400 BC - The Vedas, the Hindu scripture was written.

Benedikt
17-09-2012, 22:00
when -man- found out that gunpowder could not only be used to shoot up fancy fireworks but used it to load guns and cannons.
and the world was never the same again.


and not hijacking the -Gutenberg printing press- post. it must have been the innovation and mass production of paper. only that made after all cheap printing possible.

electricity for all? this made after all live worth living after the sun went down.

the steam engine? brought us after all the mechanical and industrial revolution and all the mess that we are in now.

martpark
18-09-2012, 00:13
when -man- found out that gunpowder could not only be used to shoot up fancy fireworks but used it to load guns and cannons.
and the world was never the same again.


and not hijacking the -Gutenberg printing press- post. it must have been the innovation and mass production of paper. only that made after all cheap printing possible.

electricity for all? this made after all live worth living after the sun went down.

the steam engine? brought us after all the mechanical and industrial revolution and all the mess that we are in now.

Large scale paper production was around before for religious and royal institutions. Much easier technology to master than Gutenberg's typeface, which lasted for a few centuries after its introduction. Much more difficult to improve.

robertmf
18-09-2012, 00:27
...(or some so may think) - and, boy, did she screw up!

This has already been in a movie :rofl:


History of the World: Part I (1981) - IMDb@@AMEPARAM@@http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTc1NDYxNzk0MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwODk2OTY5._V1._SX99_SY140_.jpg@@AMEPARAM@@BMTc1NDYxNzk0MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwODk2OTY5@@AMEPARAM@@SX99@@AMEPARAM@@SY140

Jas
18-09-2012, 10:01
I'll go with Gutenburg's Press with movable type. Allowed millions of people to read and changed the way humans viewed the world.

That's right, it's a leap, like the development of early man speaking all the way to the internet. In between, you got the invention of alphabets. All of human history is about trying to connect.
I think this is where Islamic and Western history diverge actually- in the 15the century- cos of the printing press- which then revives ancient learning, leads to the renaisssance and then the enlightenment.
It's a extremely astute point and certainly I think can be regarded as the start of the modern era u can say.

Jas
18-09-2012, 10:05
1400 BC - The Vedas, the Hindu scripture was written.

Yes, of course, Ramayana, Mahabatra, Rig Veda, Upanishad... this is critical and I agree also.
Another thing, if u don't have Hindu culture.... u don't get gods like Apollo and all the Greek gods also- cos from Indra u get Hera. The Greek gods which was central to the west- all of them came from Hindustan orginally. Actually, Hindustan is the home of everything u can say (I include Pakistan in this cos of Harapa and Mohenju Dharo).

Very good, Singh, bai.

Jas
18-09-2012, 10:07
The event that led man to use fire

Yes, it led to larger brain sizes as it allowed humans to cook meat and get protein better than just chewing. This changed body shape also- smaller stomach- so people walk more upright. But by definition.... of course this is not a historical event cos it was before history.

Jas
18-09-2012, 10:08
Why is somebody allegedly walking on the moon important to the earth we live on? :confused:

It can't be classed as the 'most important event in World history!' :10310:

It can. This is when humanity found the heavens was now a part of our own world. Yet only 12 people to date have ever walked on the moon.

Gypsy
18-09-2012, 10:27
Jas is right - walking on the moon.

Specifically, leaving our planet, flying to another one, and then returning. The single most important event in history. Because it is the ultimate event. We are on a timeline of progress and knowledge, we came out of caves, we learned how to do new things, we can communicate, we learned about science and dumped gods, we can keep ourselves warm in the cold, dry in the wet, travel from one place to another - and this is the ultimate, so far.

If leaving our planet, landing safely on another one, and then returning safely does not blow your mind, and everything else into a cocked hat, then you have no imagination.

mds45
18-09-2012, 10:37
It's difficult and maybe impossible to say one event is the No.1 but I would suggest the industrial revolution changed the way everyone lives.

Jas
18-09-2012, 11:11
It's difficult and maybe impossible to say one event is the No.1 but I would suggest the industrial revolution changed the way everyone lives.

Yes, that makes sense to me. But was there a specific event behind it? Something that sparked it off? I wud say it was when they used water to drive water wheels. But do u know they had waterwheels in South Asia for thousands of years and it didn't lead to steam power? So there are key people involved I think, inventors who speed up history.

Jas
18-09-2012, 11:15
Jas is right - walking on the moon.

Specifically, leaving our planet, flying to another one, and then returning. The single most important event in history. Because it is the ultimate event. We are on a timeline of progress and knowledge, we came out of caves, we learned how to do new things, we can communicate, we learned about science and dumped gods, we can keep ourselves warm in the cold, dry in the wet, travel from one place to another - and this is the ultimate, so far.

If leaving our planet, landing safely on another one, and then returning safely does not blow your mind, and everything else into a cocked hat, then you have no imagination.



The moon landing was America at its best. It was the triumph of man. I think why people don't get it is because only 12 people have walked on the moon- and the significance of the moonlanding will maybe take hundreds of years and beyond to work themselves out.

mds45
18-09-2012, 11:17
Yes, that makes sense to me. But was there a specific event behind it? Something that sparked it off? I wud say it was when they used water to drive water wheels. But do u know they had waterwheels in South Asia for thousands of years and it didn't lead to steam power? So there are key people involved I think, inventors who speed up history.

Yep agreed, i you coud be more specific and say the invention or harnessing of steam , after all even nuclear aircraft carriers still need steam to move .

SV1973a
18-09-2012, 11:34
The invention of the washing machine.
Time became available for mothers to invest in the education of children, and that started it all of. I heard an expose about this on the radio.

sashadidi
18-09-2012, 12:32
Not a single event as such but the discovery of vaccines for some killer diseases saved childrens lives and changed the world .

singhshakti2020
18-09-2012, 12:44
I think discovery of million Gods from India, still protecting the world.

rosieredwood
18-09-2012, 12:45
The asteroid that collided with the Earth to form the Yucatan Peninsula, creating a nuclear winter that wiped out the large reptiles, thereby paving the way for mammals to evolve and for Homo sapiens to arise to the forefront.

Jas
18-09-2012, 13:16
The asteroid that collided with the Earth to form the Yucatan Peninsula, creating a nuclear winter that wiped out the large reptiles, thereby paving the way for mammals to evolve and for Homo sapiens to arise to the forefront.

Or the planet that struck the earth and threw up all this stuff that became the moon. I read that if there was no moon.... there wud be just a water planet with tidal waves of 10,000 feet or more which wud have made life impossible.

Jas
18-09-2012, 13:20
I think discovery of million Gods from India, still protecting the world.

It's very much underestimated the importance of Hindustan's contribution to world civilization. U got numbers even.... it came from Hindustan, all sorts of astrononomical and science practices also. Also even people.... Like the country where I am in right now, there's gypsies and one thing I am sure about is that they just MUST be from Hindustan cos u just have to look at them to know.

Benedikt
18-09-2012, 14:11
Yes, that makes sense to me. But was there a specific event behind it? Something that sparked it off? I wud say it was when they used water to drive water wheels. But do u know they had waterwheels in South Asia for thousands of years and it didn't lead to steam power? So there are key people involved I think, inventors who speed up history.



with that water could be pumped out from mines in greater quantity and air pumped down also. leads to more production. not necessary though to much improvement for the miners.
with one steam engine you could power 10 or 20 weaving machines, which was part of the industrial revolution ( Manchester and Leeds). Steam Engines were not dependent on a water source, you could put them up anywhere. waterwheels were working only where there was a river, or at least a canal or dam or the like.

and than maybe also RobertStevenson with his Locomotive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephenson's_Rocket

After all one loco could haul more freight than 50 horses.

celia
18-09-2012, 15:28
I don't know which was more important - the creation of a single cell (four billion years ago) or the splitting of the cell (two billion years ago) - but this has to be the most important event in history. :10310:

okiey
18-09-2012, 19:06
Wasn't the most important event in history the birth of Kim Jong-Il.

Personally, I don't see how walking on the moon had any great affect on anyone's life -- and indeed, it has not.

On a serious note .. In my view, both World wars had profound affects on the lives of tens, if not hundreds, of millions of people and changed the Old world order. If we are talking about events that have had very real and huge affects on individual lives and changed the course of history, then there are few comparisons.

Jas
18-09-2012, 19:36
Wasn't the most important event in history the birth of Kim Jong-Il.

Personally, I don't see how walking on the moon had any great affect on anyone's life -- and indeed, it has not.

On a serious note .. In my view, both World wars had profound affects on the lives of tens, if not hundreds, of millions of people and changed the Old world order. If we are talking about events that have had very real and huge affects on individual lives and changed the course of history, then there are few comparisons.



Yes, I agree with that. If World War One had not happened then most of the world might still be under colonial rule- though brown and black peoples wud ofcourse be fighting for freedom.

It's interesting to note no one sees anything to do with Jesus as critical. What about the conversion of Constantine to Christianity? What if there was no Moses..... wud u have gotten Judaism, Christianity, and then Al Islam?

Jas
18-09-2012, 19:41
with that water could be pumped out from mines in greater quantity and air pumped down also. leads to more production. not necessary though to much improvement for the miners.
with one steam engine you could power 10 or 20 weaving machines, which was part of the industrial revolution ( Manchester and Leeds). Steam Engines were not dependent on a water source, you could put them up anywhere. waterwheels were working only where there was a river, or at least a canal or dam or the like.

and than maybe also RobertStevenson with his Locomotive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephenson's_Rocket

After all one loco could haul more freight than 50 horses.


Steam power got first invented by Heron of Alexandria. If his stuff had become more wider known- we might have got the industrial revolution in Egypt on the Nile, in Sumer on the Tigris and in Mohenjo Dharo on the Indus. Think of that! It wud have been glorious!

Another point.... the reason we never got the industrial revolution was cos the Mongols smashed up all our stuff and it took centuries even for farming to recover. But scientific genius was rooted in the east of course.

Jas
18-09-2012, 19:42
I don't know which was more important - the creation of a single cell (four billion years ago) or the splitting of the cell (two billion years ago) - but this has to be the most important event in history. :10310:

Yet if we nuke each other out then it's the splitting of the atom.

Sadarr
18-09-2012, 21:36
IMHO the event with the largest daily impact on our lives today is the 1979 official recognition of the PRC by the US.

Quite a bit more emotional and probably the main reason I’m able to post this from Moscow is the 1989 fall of the wall.

Going in the wayback machine I vote for the death of Christ as it is by far the world’s biggest (population wise) religion. (Philosophy)

TolkoRaz
18-09-2012, 22:12
Some would argue that the invention of the fridge or deep freeze was a major invention, others wold argue that Penicillin or a syringe needle was also equally important.

I personally think that man's first flight which started the evolution of passenger air travel was a very important and significant event in making the World a much smaller and accessible place :book:

TolkoRaz
18-09-2012, 22:21
Jas is right - walking on the moon.

Specifically, leaving our planet, flying to another one, and then returning. The single most important event in history. Because it is the ultimate event. We are on a timeline of progress and knowledge, we came out of caves, we learned how to do new things, we can communicate, we learned about science and dumped gods, we can keep ourselves warm in the cold, dry in the wet, travel from one place to another - and this is the ultimate, so far.

If leaving our planet, landing safely on another one, and then returning safely does not blow your mind, and everything else into a cocked hat, then you have no imagination.

Nice to see you back Gypsy, :) especially as we seem to have been careless and lost yakespeare! :eek:

Landing on the Moon is very impressive, but am still not convinced it is the most important World Event, nor do I see it as the ultimate event - soon man may be walking on Mars or going beyond what we already know is out there.

And, most importantly, how has man (and woman) significantly benefited from man walking on the moon? :coffee:

rusmeister
19-09-2012, 18:24
The Incarnation of the Creator on this planet in a definite and well-documented historical period, and His subsequent defeat of death by Resurrection, thereby making it possible for all of us to live forever.

I'd say that beats out moons, wars and washing machines...

Jas
19-09-2012, 18:27
The Incarnation of the Creator on this planet in a definite and well-documented historical period, and His subsequent defeat of death by Resurrection, thereby making it possible for all of us to live forever.

I'd say that beats out moons, wars and washing machines...

Yes, but u have to believe in it and stuff for it to work.

rusmeister
19-09-2012, 19:01
Yes, but u have to believe in it and stuff for it to work.
No you don't.
As the actual fact of the matter, it does not require your belief for it to be true ("work"); it remains true whether you believe it or not.

celia
19-09-2012, 20:46
Jas, meet Rus. Rus, Jas.

MickeyTong
19-09-2012, 22:34
For me it is this: July 20th 1969, when Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the moon.


http://i54.tinypic.com/20uwpbs.jpg

Russian Lad
19-09-2012, 22:48
For me it is this: July 20th 1969, when Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the moon. The only thing that compares to that is the discovery of fire 1 million years back.

How about the first man in space? A hint - he wasn't an American...
To me, though, the invention of computers and the arrival of the digital age seems to be the event that stands out from all others.

okiey
19-09-2012, 23:04
Can someone explain what impact a man landing on the moon or space had on peoples lives?

Back in the day the great explorers: Leif Erickson; James Cook; Vasco de Gama; Christopher Columbus were no less important considering the technology and craft available.

From a technological perspective: telecommunications and aircraft have had a significantly greater impact.

Russian Lad
19-09-2012, 23:13
Can someone explain what impact a man landing on the moon or space had on peoples lives?

Err... Do you use a mobile telephone?

MickeyTong
19-09-2012, 23:19
How about the first man in space? A hint - he wasn't an American...


Aaah - who can forget Laika?

Russian Lad
19-09-2012, 23:24
How about the first man in space? A hint - he wasn't an American...
Aaah - who can forget Laika?

You see, even the first dog in space wasn't American.:))

okiey
19-09-2012, 23:24
Err... Do you use a mobile telephone?

Then I nominate the launch of Sputnik as the greatest event in world history

Russian Lad
19-09-2012, 23:30
Originally Posted by Russian Lad
Err... Do you use a mobile telephone?
Then I nominate the launch of Sputnik as the greatest event in world history

So, you believe men up there weren't needed to learn more about space? Doesn't seem so to me...
Besides, the Moon can become an invaluable source of raw materials for us down here or of some other things, who knows.

MickeyTong
19-09-2012, 23:32
You see, even the first dog in space wasn't American.:))

Does a dog have a nationality?

Russland, Rusland uber Alles!

Russian Lad
19-09-2012, 23:34
Does a dog have a nationality?

You made a joke, I reciprocated. I didn't ask you why you thought Laika was a man, after all.:)

martpark
19-09-2012, 23:43
Then I nominate the launch of Sputnik as the greatest event in world history

You might want to nominate Newton and his laws of physics. Without him who knows when a Sputnik would stay in orbit.

MickeyTong
19-09-2012, 23:44
You made a joke, I reciprocated. I didn't ask you why you thought Laika was a man, after all.:)

:beerbros:

Jas
20-09-2012, 10:38
You might want to nominate Newton and his laws of physics. Without him who knows when a Sputnik would stay in orbit.

Well sat based communications really changed the world and that's for sure.