PDA

View Full Version : The General Knowledge Quiz Extravaganza



Jas
08-08-2012, 22:39
Guys, rules are simple.
Get the question right.... you get to ask a question.
Let's jump right in then.
Only one other rule: You must answer without checking the internet or a book.
I decide who gets it right and rong.


QUESTION:
What was Alexander the Great's dad called?

yakspeare
08-08-2012, 23:57
Guys, rules are simple.
Get the question right.... you get to ask a question.
Let's jump right in then.
Only one other rule: You must answer without checking the internet or a book.
I decide who gets it right and rong.


QUESTION:
What was Alexander the Great's dad called?

Papa?

mds45
08-08-2012, 23:57
Guys, rules are simple.
Get the question right.... you get to ask a question.
Let's jump right in then.
Only one other rule: You must answer without checking the internet or a book.
I decide who gets it right and rong.


QUESTION:
What was Alexander the Great's dad called?

I know - was it Papa ?

mds45
08-08-2012, 23:58
Great minds think alike Yak :)

RichardB
09-08-2012, 00:13
I decide who gets it right and rong (sic).

Isn't that how the Nazis' worked?

penka
09-08-2012, 00:19
Guys, rules are simple.
Get the question right.... you get to ask a question.
Let's jump right in then.
Only one other rule: You must answer without checking the internet or a book.
I decide who gets it right and rong.


QUESTION:
What was Alexander the Great's dad called?

Jas,
Alexander's papa was Philip, mama was Olympias and
YOU WILL SCREW MY ENGLISH WITH YOUR SPELLING!!!

Jas
09-08-2012, 00:21
Penka! Traah laaah.:fireworks: Philip is the totally correct answer.
Bingo.
Ok, ure turn to ask.:

Jas
09-08-2012, 01:22
Ok, new question guys, so heads up.:10189:

Where did the Great Fire of London start?

Nobbynumbnuts
09-08-2012, 01:27
Ok, new question guys, so heads up.:10189:

Where did the Great Fire of London start?

Pudding Lane, in a bakery.

Benedikt
09-08-2012, 12:29
Isn't that how the Nazis' worked?

would be nice indeed.:11629:

Jas
09-08-2012, 14:01
This is correct Nobby, well done.


Ok, here's another one...

Question: What was the name of Charles Darwin's ship that he sailed on when he made his journey to the Gaulapagoos Islands?

Nobbynumbnuts
09-08-2012, 14:20
This is correct Nobby, well done.


Ok, here's another one...

Question: What was the name of Charles Darwin's ship that he sailed on when he made his journey to the Gaulapagoos Islands?

The Beagle (i think the spelling is right)

Nobbynumbnuts
09-08-2012, 14:23
Which capital city is closest to the equator?

Jas
09-08-2012, 14:24
Akra

Tony P
09-08-2012, 14:29
Which capital city is closest to the equator?

Nairobi ?
It's close and a capital.

celia
09-08-2012, 15:15
Quito (spelling?) in Ecuador.

Nobbynumbnuts
09-08-2012, 17:15
Quito (spelling?) in Ecuador.

....is correct, your throw.

celia
09-08-2012, 18:48
Broccoli, sprouts and cauliflower are all members of which family of plants?:shhhhhh:

Tony P
09-08-2012, 19:42
Broccoli, sprouts and cauliflower are all members of which family of plants?:shhhhhh:
Brasicas
(just been weeding them at dacha!)

penka
09-08-2012, 20:02
Cruciferous family, if I spell it correctly (крестоцветные)

celia
09-08-2012, 22:01
The answer is Brassica, so it's your turn Tony.

celia
09-08-2012, 22:06
Penka, I didn't even know what cruciferous means - I looked it up and it means:

Cruciferous is defined as a plant or vegetable that belongs to the Cruciferae family of plants. Cruciferous vegetables are known as the wonder kids of the vegetable world. Some varieties of cruciferous vegetables include cabbage, bok choy, collards, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens and cauliflower.

I still don't know what all those vegetables have in common, but yes, you're right, the vegetables I mentioned are part of this larger group. So I say that whoever gets to the computer first, you or Tony, can give the next question. :idea:

Tony P
09-08-2012, 22:08
How many lines are on the surface of a tennis court?

Jas
09-08-2012, 22:11
7. It must be.
7 is the most significant number in design.

martpark
09-08-2012, 22:13
10

tasel
09-08-2012, 22:20
I think its 9

Tony P
09-08-2012, 22:58
Nope!

robertmf
10-08-2012, 00:51
I think its 9

:11030: Only if 5 x 2 = 9

Tony P
10-08-2012, 01:03
Not any of the answers yet - 7, 10 or 9.

Keep trying (no catch!)

PeteD
10-08-2012, 02:01
In theory, it could be 5 or 6.

It depends on the definition of "tennis court".

Seeing as we can't look it up, I will speculate.....

You said there were no tricks, so I will assume that you are talking about conventional tennis, as opposed to long tennis.

The "court" will be defined as one or both sides of the net - I don't know which, but this will affect the count by one, if it is defined as the area on one side of the net.

What we see, generally, is a playing surface which can be adapted for singles or doubles play. A court could be defined as an area for singles play, which would make the doubles lines superfluous.

This would mean that there are 2 sidelines, a base line, a service line and a centre-service line, making 5. If the court is the whole area, both sides of the net (for a singles game), then there are 2 base lines, making a total of 6.

Tony P
10-08-2012, 02:13
Gor blimey Guv, this is getting complex ;)

OK. To be clear.

How many straight lines are there painted on the grass at Wimbledon Centre Court prior to any match, singles or doubles, and prior to the net being errected?

(Do not consider the net to disect lines)



We have all watched tennis. So.... ?

PeteD
10-08-2012, 02:31
The obvious answer, in this case, is 9.

You have said, already, that this is the incorrect answer....

Therefore, we need to look at the inobvious....

The definition of a "line".

Is, for example, each baseline a single line, or is it 3 lines (the 2 parts between the tramlines and the middle part)?

This would provide an answer of 19, if the same logic was carried through the other areas.....

penka
10-08-2012, 02:34
Jisses. Only a man could have posed such a question. Trivia rests, haha.

Tony P
10-08-2012, 02:36
I suppose a fair definition of a straight line is 'a continuous marking in a single direction'.

Can't stay up longer. Carry on in the morning!

PeteD
10-08-2012, 02:39
Jisses. Only a man could have posed such a question. Trivia rests, haha.

TonyP's a retired bean-counter, Penka, so numbers are important to him!

I just hope he remembers to count the number of slaps he's going to get in the pub tomorrow night! ;)

PeteD
10-08-2012, 02:53
I suppose a fair definition of a straight line is 'a continuous marking in a single direction'.

The mathematical definition of a straight line used to be "the shortest distance between 2 points"

Seeing as there are 4 "points" on each baseline, this was my thinking along the lines (pun intended!)

I remember being quite confused and bemused when my father (an ex-maths teacher) told me, several years ago, that the definition has been superseded, as it is no longer true!

robertmf
10-08-2012, 05:08
The mathematical definition of a straight line used to be "the shortest distance between 2 points"

Seeing as there are 4 "points" on each baseline, this was my thinking along the lines (pun intended!)

I remember being quite confused and bemused when my father (an ex-maths teacher) told me, several years ago, that the definition has been superseded, as it is no longer true!

I suggest yo'all draft The Rusmeister to make the proper orthodox determination of how many lines on a tennis court :trampoline:

:tgif:

Benedikt
10-08-2012, 09:06
I still don't know what all those vegetables have in common,



http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/super-veggies-cruciferous-vegetables

they all belong to the Cabbage family. While some look like cabbages fair enough, others do not.
But who can argue with Botanics with what reasoning they put things into a category.

tasel
10-08-2012, 09:35
Gor blimey Guv, this is getting complex ;)

OK. To be clear.

How many straight lines are there painted on the grass at Wimbledon Centre Court prior to any match, singles or doubles, and prior to the net being errected?

(Do not consider the net to disect lines)



We have all watched tennis. So.... ?

5 :question:

PeteD
10-08-2012, 10:38
11, counting the 2 centre marks as (very short) lines...

Tony P
10-08-2012, 10:46
11, counting the 2 centre marks as (very short) lines...

At last...... Well done!
It's the two short ones at the server's feet that most people forget.

Your question...

PeteD
10-08-2012, 10:49
:)

We all know the expression "spam email"....

How did this originate?

Jas
10-08-2012, 13:54
Fine. Let's stick to questions that aren't myopic in nature as it will slow down the game.
Let's bowl again, guys with a brand new question.

a) Who first circumnavigated the earth?

Nobbynumbnuts
10-08-2012, 14:05
Fine. Let's stick to questions that aren't myopic in nature as it will slow down the game.
Let's bowl again, guys with a brand new question.

a) Who first circumnavigated the earth?

Ferdinand Magelan?

Jas
10-08-2012, 14:37
Yes, Nobby, that's right.
Ok, u won the right to ask a question. Congrats!!

OzPara
10-08-2012, 14:40
Ferdinand Magelan?

Since Magellan died before the voyage was completed, it was his navigator - Juan Sebastián Elcano - who actually completed the first circumnavigation.

Nobbynumbnuts
10-08-2012, 14:43
What was the world's population in AD1?

Jas
10-08-2012, 14:44
School books told it was Magellan and that's how most people see it, but yes, ure right technically.

Jas
10-08-2012, 14:45
50 million

Nobbynumbnuts
10-08-2012, 14:48
Since Magellan died before the voyage was completed, it was his navigator - Juan Sebastián Elcano - who actually completed the first circumnavigation.

Technically true, but then there were 18 survivors (all chronicled) of the original expedition who returned to Spain.

Nobbynumbnuts
10-08-2012, 14:49
50 million

Het

Jas
10-08-2012, 14:50
25 million

Nobbynumbnuts
10-08-2012, 14:53
25 million

Nowhere near.

OzPara
10-08-2012, 14:56
230million +/- a few

Nobbynumbnuts
10-08-2012, 15:00
230million +/- a few

The figure i'm using is 200,000,000 so you're close enough.
Your turn....

OzPara
10-08-2012, 15:03
How many bits in a gByte?

Jas
10-08-2012, 15:27
1 million

OzPara
10-08-2012, 15:27
1 million

Nope!

Nobbynumbnuts
10-08-2012, 15:33
100 million?

OzPara
10-08-2012, 15:37
100 million?

Closer, but still no cupie doll!

OzPara
10-08-2012, 15:50
I have to go, but I'll leave you with a hint;

The answer (when written as numbers only) does NOT contain ANY zeroes...

ttfn

tasel
10-08-2012, 17:13
1 trillion & 24

OzPara
11-08-2012, 05:55
1 trillion & 24
That would have lots of zeroes!

1 000 000 000 024

But on the right track...

tasel
11-08-2012, 22:10
1073741824
But, sorry i found this exact figure on internet.

Jas
11-08-2012, 22:13
Fine, at least that's solved it then.
So here me next question.

1) When did humans first arrive in North America?

Tony P
12-08-2012, 00:24
When did humans first arrive in North America?

June 25th

OzPara
12-08-2012, 04:49
1073741824
But, sorry i found this exact figure on internet.

Sorry, but your internet search didn't give you the right answer!

Close though, so I'll put this to bed!

there are 8 bits to the byte, 1024 bytes to the kbyte, 1024 kbytes to the mbyte and 1024 mbytes the the gbyte.

so the correct answer is 8 589 934 592


(Your answer is the number of bytes in a gbyte - you just needed to mulitply by 8)

Nobbynumbnuts
12-08-2012, 05:50
...............1) When did humans first arrive in North America?

Are you sure they have arrived? ;)

Seriously though, i know they arrived via the land bridge between Alaska and Russia so i'd say 40,000 years ago?

Jas
12-08-2012, 12:27
No, Nobby, but not a bad guess either and ure right about the Alaska land bridge, though people think also now they followed the iced up coasts in small boats, the evidence of their settlements lost with rising sea tides as the ice melted.
Anyhow, guess again guys....

Nobbynumbnuts
12-08-2012, 13:14
No, Nobby, but not a bad guess either and ure right about the Alaska land bridge, though people think also now they followed the iced up coasts in small boats, the evidence of their settlements lost with rising sea tides as the ice melted.
Anyhow, guess again guys....

30,000 then....

Jas
12-08-2012, 13:28
Er, no

Tony P
12-08-2012, 13:41
A Tuesday ?